Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to list time complexities of operations of common data structures like Arrays, Binary Search Tree, Heap, Linked List, etc. and especially I am referring to Java. They are very common, but I guess some of us are not 100% confident about the exact answer. Any help, especially references, is greatly appreciated.

E.g. For singly linked list: Changing an internal element is O(1). How can you do it? You HAVE to search the element before changing it. Also, for the Vector, adding an internal element is given as O(n). But why can't we do it in amortized constant time using the index? Please correct me if I am missing something.

I am posting my findings/guesses as the first answer.

share|improve this question
1  
When you vote a question to close, at least add a comment. –  Bhushan Sep 3 '11 at 18:29
    
Downvoted for the reason given in my answer. –  EJP Sep 4 '11 at 9:54
1  
Time and Space Complexities for all data structures Big O cheat sheet –  vbp Feb 26 at 16:25
    
In case someone else steps into this, take a minute to also check this link: infotechgems.blogspot.gr/2011/11/… –  vefthym Apr 7 at 8:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Arrays

  • Set, Check element at a particular index: O(1)
  • Searching: O(n) if array is unsorted and O(log n) if array is sorted and something like a binary search is used,
  • As pointed out by Aivean, there is no Delete operation available on Arrays. We can symbolically delete an element by setting it to some specific value, e.g. -1, 0, etc. depending on our requirements
  • Similarly, Insert for arrays is basically Set as mentioned in the beginning

ArrayList:

  • Add: Amortized O(1)
  • Remove: O(n)
  • Contains: O(n)
  • Size: O(1)

Linked List:

  • Inserting: O(1), if done at the head, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
  • Deleting: O(1), if done at the head, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
  • Searching: O(n)

Doubly-Linked List:

  • Inserting: O(1), if done at the head or tail, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
  • Deleting: O(1), if done at the head or tail, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
  • Searching: O(n)

Stack:

  • Push: O(1)
  • Pop: O(1)
  • Top: O(1)
  • Search (Something like lookup, as a special operation): O(n) (I guess so)

Queue/Deque/Circular Queue:

  • Insert: O(1)
  • Remove: O(1)
  • Size: O(1)

Binary Search Tree:

  • Insert, delete and search: Average case: O(log n), Worst Case: O(n)

Red-Black Tree:

  • Insert, delete and search: Average case: O(log n), Worst Case: O(log n)

Heap/PriorityQueue (min/max):

  • findMin/findMax: O(1)
  • insert: O(log n)
  • deleteMin/Max: O(log n)
  • lookup, delete (if at all provided): O(n), we will have to scan all the elements as they are not ordered like BST

HashMap/Hashtable/HashSet:

  • Insert/Delete: O(1) amortized
  • Re-size/hash: O(n)
  • Contains: O(1)
share|improve this answer
2  
awesome answer. Thanks a lot +1 for you. –  Nikhil Agrawal Apr 24 '13 at 8:58
2  
Good reference, to recall things... –  Dreamer Jul 6 at 19:09
    
Inserting an element into Array (and by insert I mean adding new element into position, shifting all elements to the right) will take O(n). Same for deletion. Only replacing existent element will take O(n). Also it's possible that you mixed it with adding new element to resizable array (it has amortized O(1) time). –  Aivean Sep 23 at 17:23
    
Also please note, that for Doubly-linked list inserting and deleting to both head and tail will take O(1) (you mentioned only head). –  Aivean Sep 23 at 17:26
    
And final note, balanced search trees (for example, Red-black tree that is actually used for TreeMap in Java) has guaranteed worst-case time of O(ln n) for all operations. –  Aivean Sep 23 at 17:28

Arrays

Set, Check element at a particular index: O(1)
Searching: O(n) if array is unsorted and O(log n) if array is sorted and something like a binary search is used,
As pointed out by Aivean, there is no Delete operation available on Arrays. We can symbolically delete an element by setting it to some specific value, e.g. -1, 0, etc. depending on our requirements
Similarly, Insert for arrays is basically Set as mentioned in the beginning

ArrayList:

Add: Amortized O(1)
Remove: O(n)
Contains: O(n)
Size: O(1)

Linked List:

Inserting: O(1), if done at the head, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
Deleting: O(1), if done at the head, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
Searching: O(n)

Doubly-Linked List:

Inserting: O(1), if done at the head or tail, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
Deleting: O(1), if done at the head or tail, O(n) if anywhere else since we have to reach that position by traveseing the linkedlist linearly.
Searching: O(n)
share|improve this answer
    
I think that's exactly what the already posted answer says? –  Bhushan Nov 10 at 22:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.