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Ideally, I want to add to the NumberList, without deleting it Makinging another NumberList, and adding that to NumberRanges, List.

//How to add 8 to NumberRanges.NumberGroup.GroupEven
//How to add 9 to NumberRanges.NumberGroup.GroupOdd
AddEvenNumberToRange(oNumberRanges, 8);
AddOddNumberToRange(oNumberRanges, 9);


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections;

namespace AddToList
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            NumberList oGroupEven = new NumberList();
            InitialLoadEvenNumbers(oGroupEven);
            NumberList oGroupOdd = new NumberList();
            InitialLoadOddNumbers(oGroupOdd);

            NumberRanges oNumberRanges = new NumberRanges();
            CombineNumberRanges(oGroupEven, oGroupOdd, oNumberRanges);
            OutPutRanges(oNumberRanges);
            Console.ReadKey();

            //This code below will throw execption unitl implemented.
            //How to add 8 to NumberRanges.NumberGroup.GroupEven
            //How to add 9 to NumberRanges.NumberGroup.GroupOdd
            AddEvenNumberToRange(oNumberRanges, 8);
            AddOddNumberToRange(oNumberRanges, 9);
            OutPutRanges(oNumberRanges);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static void AddOddNumberToRange(NumberRanges oNumberRanges, int p)
        { 
            //I'm stuck on the best approach to add a number to existing collection
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        private static void AddEvenNumberToRange(NumberRanges oNumberRanges, int p)
        {
            //I'm stuck on the best approach to add a number to existing collection
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }


        private static void OutPutRanges(NumberRanges oNumberRanges)
        {
            foreach (NumberList olist in oNumberRanges)
            {
                foreach (int iNum in olist)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(iNum.ToString());
                }
            }
        }

        private static void CombineNumberRanges(NumberList oGroupEven, NumberList oGroupOdd, NumberRanges oNumberRanges)
        {
            oNumberRanges.NumberGroups.Add(oGroupEven);
            oNumberRanges.NumberGroups.Add(oGroupOdd);
        }

        private static void InitialLoadOddNumbers(NumberList oGroupOdd)
        {
            oGroupOdd.Number.Add(3);
            oGroupOdd.Number.Add(5);
            oGroupOdd.Number.Add(7);
        }

        private static void InitialLoadEvenNumbers(NumberList oGroupEven)
        {
            oGroupEven.Number.Add(2);
            oGroupEven.Number.Add(4);
            oGroupEven.Number.Add(6);
        }
    }

    public class NumberList : IEnumerator, IEnumerable
    {

       public List<int> Number = new List<int>();

       #region GetEnumeratorSetup
       private int m_iPosition = -1;

       public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
       {
           return Number.GetEnumerator();
       }

       public object Current
       {
           get
           {
               return Number;
           }
       }

       public bool MoveNext()
       {
            m_iPosition++;
            return true;
       }

       public void Reset()
       {
           m_iPosition = 0;
       }
       #endregion
    }

    public class NumberRanges: IEnumerator, IEnumerable
    {
        public List<NumberList> NumberGroups = new List<NumberList>();

        #region EnumerationSetup
        private int m_iPosition = -1;
        public object Current
        {
            get
            {
                return NumberGroups;
            }
        }

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            m_iPosition++;
            return true;
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            m_iPosition = 0;
        }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return NumberGroups.GetEnumerator();
        }
        #endregion
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why are you implementing your own collections? It looks like using List<T> directly should work fine for you. –  svick Sep 3 '11 at 18:46
    
Is this perhaps a homework question? If it is, please tag it as such. Are you required to use the supplied method signatures (AddEvenNumberToRange(NumberRanges, int) and AddOddNumberToRange(NumberRanges, int)? –  Tim Sep 3 '11 at 21:49
    
svick thanks for the List<T> suggestion. –  chris olsen Sep 4 '11 at 2:02
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

List<T> really is the way to go (as svick pointed out), but if you must do it this way, it would seem to me the following would be simplest:

private static void AddOddNumberToRange(NumberRanges oNumberRanges, int p)
{ 
    oNumberRanges.NumberGroups[1].Number.Add(p);
}

private static void AddEvenNumberToRange(NumberRanges oNumberRanges, int p)
{
    oNumberRanges.NumberGroups[0].Number.Add(p);
}

This will produce the following output on the second call to OutPutRanges:

2
4
6
8
3
5
7
9

Using List<T>

If you wanted to use List<T>, you'd need two List<int> (oGroupEven and oGroupOdd), and one List<List<int>> for oNumberRanges. You could, if desired, actually get rid of oGroupEven and oGroupOdd and use one List<List<int>> to take your above code and condense it into a few lines of code in the Main method:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Create the oNumberRanges and initialize it with the even and odd lists
        List<List<int>> oNumberRanges = new List<List<int>>() { new List<int>(){ 2, 4, 6}, new List<int>() { 3, 5, 7 } };

        OutPutRanges(oNumberRanges);
        Console.ReadKey();

        // Add 8 to the even list
        oNumberRanges[0].Add(8);
        // Add 9 to the odd list
        oNumberRanges[1].Add(9);

        OutPutRanges(oNumberRanges);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private static void OutPutRanges(List<List<int>> oNumberRanges)
    {
        foreach (List<int> olist in oNumberRanges)
        {
            foreach (int iNum in olist)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(iNum.ToString());
            }
        }
    }

Which would produce the following output:

2
4
6
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
3
5
7
9
share|improve this answer
    
Tim, this is exactly what wanted. Is it possible to name the list, then access the List by a name? Instead of oNumberRanges[0].Add(8); oNumberRanges["even"].Add(8). If so, could you provide an example? –  chris olsen Sep 4 '11 at 2:18
    
@chris - not out of the box, at least not that I'm aware of. You could use a dictionary, with the name of the list as the key, but for only two lists that would probably be overkill. Now, if you wanted something like a mnemonic to use in the code, you could always use a couple of variables to hold the right index (i.e., int odd = 1, int even = 0) - and then pass them into the List indexer (i.e., oNumberRanges[even].Add(8)). –  Tim Sep 4 '11 at 2:46
    
Thank you. Resolved –  chris olsen Sep 4 '11 at 3:03
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