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I am sure that this question is already answered, but I find it hard to search for it.

I have the following html:

<div id='outerBox'>
  <div id='leftBox'><div id='secondLevelBox'></div></div>
  <div id='rightBox'></div>
</div>

and the following css:

#outerBox {
    width: 300px;
    height: 200px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}
#leftBox {
    height: 100%;
    width: 55%;
    background-color: blue;
    float: left;
}
#rightBox {
    height: 100%;
    width: 45%;
    background-color: yellow;
    float: left;
}
#secondLevelBox {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}

(See http://jsfiddle.net/dsMdb/1/)

this displays ok. But if I now add a border: 1px solid red to one of the inner divs, they will grow 2 pixels and the layout will break: http://jsfiddle.net/dsMdb/5/

How can I wrokaround this? (solutions for IE >=8 and current FF are ok)

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OK. Maybe my aproach to use divs is wrong. Any other idea for such a layout? –  Ralf Sep 3 '11 at 19:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can change the way the browser is supposed to calculate the offset for the border & layout. Take a look at the Box Model properties in CSS3, this way you can define the offset etc.

The command you're looking for in CSS is box-sizing. By default this set to content-box, which adds the width, padding etc as different values on top of each other.

By setting it to border-box, you can force the browser to instead render the box with the specified width and height, and add the border and padding inside the box. Should apply to your border as well normally.

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Hm. couldn't find a statement on how to include the width of the border in the total width calculation of the browser. –  Ralf Sep 3 '11 at 19:38
1  
My bad, i'll edit my anwser –  NekoNova Sep 3 '11 at 19:48
    
ok. I googled a little bit. I guess this is what you are talking about: jsfiddle.net/dsMdb/9 . and it works! Only have to recheck with IE :-) –  Ralf Sep 3 '11 at 19:52
    
ok. IE8 seems to work, IE7 breaks. But that's ok! –  Ralf Sep 3 '11 at 19:54
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Problem is that it adds a border on the outside of that inner div. Since your red border is 1px, then it adds total of 2px.

Quick way to fix this is to remove `2px` from the outer `div`s width.

#outerBox {
    width: 298px;
    height: 200px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

Also, I would like to add, that this fix is very browser compatible ;)

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1  
However, I couldn't test this, because I'm not sure where you are adding the 1px dotted solid border.. If you could provide an example with the red border or tell me, to what container you are adding the border, I could give you a live example ^^ –  Kalle H. Väravas Sep 3 '11 at 19:23
    
but if I add a border to one of the inner divs, I can't remove 2px since their width is in percentage... –  Ralf Sep 3 '11 at 19:24
1  
Ok, make an example with the red border in jsfiddle and I will take a look at it. –  Kalle H. Väravas Sep 3 '11 at 19:30
1  
Ok, for this type of layout, you need to let something go. So, what is the priority? The outer width 300px or inner widths? –  Kalle H. Väravas Sep 3 '11 at 19:37
1  
jsfiddle.net/hobobne/dsMdb/7 This is very alternative, but techincally with the same parameters. Note that I'm setting the most inner containers dimensions only and then let the parents dimensions set dynamically. However, if you are looking for symmetry, then you have to choose the inner containers width wisely and keep in mind the borders sizes. So if you want your parents width to be 150px exact.. And you have two children with 1px each, then you have set the most inner child's width not 300px exact, but 296px. –  Kalle H. Väravas Sep 3 '11 at 19:46
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I would suggest to have pixel graduation in the width and accordingly give room for border, like

Since total width is 300 px,

#leftBox {
    height: 100%;
    width: 165px;
    background-color: blue;
    float: left;
}
#rightBox {
    height: 100%;
    width: 145px;
    background-color: yellow;
    float: left;
}

now reduce the width accordingly and this would work across browsers.

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