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I use the following DllImport:

[DllImport(@"someDLL.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
private static extern UINT64 someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc);

I'm calling the function as follows:

someFunc(0,0,1);

In h file i declare the function:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) UINT64 someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc);

cpp:

UINT64 someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc)
{
   ...
}

In the C++ code I receive weird values (such as 1218628, 20140292, 1219020).

Any idea why?

share|improve this question
1  
You can see both the C# code and the C++ code and can't work it out. It's not fair that you expect us to work it out only from the C# code. You tagged it interop, and that implies there are two sides to the interop. Why are you denying us access to one of the sides? –  David Heffernan Sep 3 '11 at 20:38
1  
added code from c –  Erik Sapir Sep 3 '11 at 20:40
1  
Is this a member function? If not then I can see nothing wrong. Is the C++ definitely using cdecl? –  David Heffernan Sep 3 '11 at 20:43
    
Are you still interested in solving this problem? –  David Heffernan Sep 4 '11 at 14:46

2 Answers 2

You didn't show the C++ code so I don't see the problem in your code. So, I tried recreating it myself. I created a C# WPF project which calls into a DLL.

C#:

        [DllImport(@"c:\users\owner\documents\visual studio 2010\Projects\MyDll\Release\MyDll.dll",
            CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
        private static extern UInt64 someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc); 

        private void DoIt_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            UInt64 val = someFunc(0, 0, 1);
            ResultLabel.Content = val.ToString();
        }

C++ DLL:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) unsigned __int64 someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc)
{
    CString s;
    s.Format(L"%d\t%d\t%d", arga, argb, argc);
    AfxMessageBox(s);
    return arga + argb + argc;
}

The message box from C++ shows 0 0 1 as expected and the C# code gets 1 returned as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
If it matters, I got the EntryPoint text from dumpbin /exports MyDLL.dll –  jschroedl Sep 3 '11 at 21:15
    
use extern "C" to avoid the mangling, just like the code in the question –  David Heffernan Sep 3 '11 at 21:19
    
Thats working for me too. Also tweaked my code to use unsigned __int64. So looks like we can't see the problem. –  jschroedl Sep 3 '11 at 21:25

Use __stdcall instead of __cdecl if you can, in __stdcall is the C DLL that performs stack cleanup and is the standard way windows C dlls are used.

It is also a good behaviour to specify the calling convention in your C code, both for readability and because C++ project settings can specify what calling convention use by default.

Try to set it __cdecl explicitly, maybe c++ compiler is compiling it using __stdcall.

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) UINT64 __cdecl someFunc(int arga, int argb, int argc);
share|improve this answer
1  
It doesn't matter which you use so long as you use the same at both sides. –  David Heffernan Sep 3 '11 at 22:06

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