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You can call include to mixin a module with a class in ruby, but it must be done at the beginning of the class definition. Why can't it be done inside a class function? Is there an alternate syntax?

EX:

module UsefulThings
  def a() puts "a" end
end

class IncludeTester
  include UsefulThings
    def initialize
  end
end

n = IncludeTester.new
n.a()

^^ This works, but if I change IncludeTester to the following, I get the error "undefined method `include'"

class IncludeTester
  def initialize
    include UsefulThings
  end
end
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It can be done in a class method.

This works:

module UsefulThings
  def a
    puts "a" 
  end
end

class IncludeTester
  def self.mix_in_useful_things
    include UsefulThings
  end 
end

x = IncludeTester.new

IncludeTester.mix_in_useful_things

x.a # => a

But "initialize" is not a class method, it's an instance method.

"new" is a class method. You can think of new as allocating a new object and then calling initialize on it, passing initialize whatever arguments were passed to new.

You can't call include directly in initialize because include is a private method of Class (inherited from Module), not of the newly created IncludeTester instance.

If you want to include a module into a class from an instance method, you have to do something like this:

class IncludeTester
  def initialize
    self.class.send(:include, UsefulThings)
  end
end

It's necessary to use "send" here because include is private method, which means it can only be directly invoked with an implicit receiver (of self).

When you call initialize normally in a class definition, you're actually calling it with an implicit receiver of "self", referring to the class being defined.

This is what is actually happening when you do this:

class IncludeTester
  include UsefulThings
end
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+1, nicely written answer. –  Benoit Garret Sep 3 '11 at 21:47
    
Yes, this is incredibly helpful (as were the other answers). –  spike Sep 3 '11 at 21:54

include is a method from Module, Module is the superclass of Class and so include is a method on Class and that makes it a class method in your IncludeTester. When you do this:

class IncludeTester
  def initialize
    include UsefulThings
  end
end

you're trying to call a class method inside an instance method and Ruby says

`initialize': undefined method `include'

because there is no instance method called include. If you want to call a class method inside an instance method (such as initialize), you'd do this:

def initialize
  self.class.include UsefulThings
end

But that won't work because include is a private method; you can get around that with class_eval though:

def initialize
  self.class.class_eval {
    include UsefulThings
  }
end

You would be doing include UsefulThings every single time you instantiated an IncludeTester, aside from not making much sense, it could cause problems if UsefulThings had an included method.

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The idiomatic way of circumventing access protection for private methods is to use send, not any of the eval methods. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 4 '11 at 4:05

It's actually fully possible to include a module from a class method, like so:

module Stuff
  def say_hello
    puts "hello"
  end
end

class Foo
  def self.i_am_a_class_method
    include Stuff
  end

  def i_am_an_instance_method
  end
end

You cannot however do that from an instance method, because the include method is only available as a private class method, and therefore not accessible from a Foo.new instance.

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You want the extend method:

class IncludeTester
  def initialize
    extend UsefulThings
  end
end

This need not be done within the a method either:

IncludeTester.new.tap { |newTester| newTester.extend(UsefulThings) }
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Almost! Calling "extend" from an instance method doesn't mix the module into the instance's class -- it causes an invisible "ghost" class to be added to the beginning of the object's inheritance chain (ahead of the actual class) and mixes the module into that. Mixing a module in like this doesn't affect other objects of the same class. –  bonkydog Sep 3 '11 at 22:07
    
Op wasn't clear that this wasn't his use case. –  phs Sep 3 '11 at 22:21

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