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Is there a practical limit to the number of HTML5 canvas elements you can have on one page?

For example, is 500 individual canvases feasible for a modern browser on the average computer?

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@PeeHaa: yes, sorry.. –  genesis Sep 3 '11 at 21:53
    
I've had problems with chrome crashing before 3k canvases. Empty canvases aren't a problem, these are ones copied from a video element. These canvases are not in the DOM, I was using them to buffer webcam video for playback. –  Frank Schwieterman Aug 27 '13 at 9:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Each canvas consumes memory at least, not less than an image of the same size.

How big are those canvas, anyway?

Having 500 different images on the same page could slow down the PC, and if those images are scaled down via CSS (so you have additional CPU usage), the slowness is overwhelming (I already tested it).

quick test done:

Ive created 500 512x512 canvases, and the Windows memory usage was about 40MB. Not so much, really.

Now I should draw in each one via JS, maybe using them allocates much more memory.

-edit-

500 canvases, 512x512, in each one is drawn a triangle: http://jsfiddle.net/3U4hG/1/

Consumes about 0.5GB, about 1MB for each canvas, and considering that 512x512x4 (4 bytes per pixel) is 1MB, the memory usage can be easily determined.

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Great, Thank you. –  UpTheCreek Sep 4 '11 at 9:20
1  
I feel that this misses the point, or at least only implies the "true" answer. Obviously 500 images are going to take a lot of space/performance. The important part is: how does it compare to 500 unique images? Or alternatively, is there a difference in server-side generated images served as static files compared to client-side generated images written on canvas ? –  Odalrick Mar 1 '13 at 13:19

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