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I assume everyone here is familiar with the adage that all text files should end with a newline. I've known of this "rule" for years but I've always wondered — why?

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4  
just a nitpick. it's not a "new line" at the end of the file. It's a "line break" at the end of the last line. Also, see the best answer on a related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/16222530/… –  gcb Jul 10 '13 at 16:52
2  
Just to nitpick some more, he didn't actually write “new line”, he wrote “newline”, which is correct. –  sindrenm Jun 5 at 18:28
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13 Answers

up vote 223 down vote accepted

There's at least one hard advantage to this guideline when working on a terminal emulator: All Unix tools expect this convention and work with it. For instance, when concatenating files with cat, a file terminated by newline will have a different effect than one without:

$ more a.txt
foo$ more b.txt
bar
$ more c.txt
baz
$ cat *.txt
foobar
baz

And, as the previous example also demonstrates, when displaying the file on the command line (e.g. via more), a newline-terminated file results in a correct display. An improperly terminated file might be garbled (second line).

For consistency, it’s very helpful to follow this rule – doing otherwise will incur extra work when dealing with the default Unix tools.

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The "cat" argument is actually the strongest: without the terminal newline, text files would need something else stuck in between them to be correctly combined. –  Brandon Rhodes Jul 29 '10 at 3:49
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@MathiasBynens No, that wouldn’t be helpful. cat behaves the way it is supposed to behave: Sometimes you don’t want to insert a newline between things you concatenate. Those programs do everything right, and files work totally consistently on Unix. Note that it’s not files that need to end in a newline: it’s lines in a file. A complete line on Unix is delimited by a newline character, and that is the indicator that any further content should go on a new line. Which makes sense, doesn’t it? –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 5 '12 at 6:45
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to add to this, I recently found out that a loop using read would miss the last line if the file doesn't end with a newline. –  doubleDown Oct 20 '12 at 7:17
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similar to this, it's nice to be able to do echo 'some-new-file' >> .gitignore which won't work if the .gitignore doesn't end with a newline –  hdgarrood Jan 18 '13 at 0:06
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great point - having lines end in some kind of terminator seems very reasonable come to think of it. I suppose one can think of "newline" not as "newline" but "endofoldline" –  Mala Feb 4 '13 at 21:27
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Each line should be terminated in a newline character, including the last one. Some programs have problems processing the last line of a file if it isn't newline terminated.

GCC warns about it not because it can't process the file, but because it has to as part of the standard.

The C language standard says A source file that is not empty shall end in a new-line character, which shall not be immediately preceded by a backslash character.

Since this is a "shall" clause, we must emit a diagnostic message for a violation of this rule.

This is in section 2.1.1.2 of the ANSI C 1989 standard. Section 5.1.1.2 of the ISO C 1999 standard (and probably also the ISO C 1990 standard).

Reference: The GCC/GNU mail archive.

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It may be related to the difference between:

  • text file (each line is supposed to end in an end-of-line)
  • binary file (there are no true "lines" to speak of, and the length of the file must be preserved)

If each line does end in an end-of-line, this avoids, for instance, that concatenating two text files would make the last line of the first run into the first line of the second.

Plus, an editor can check at load whether the file ends in an end-of-line, saves it in its local option 'eol', and uses that when writing the file.

A few years back (2005), many editors (ZDE, Eclipse, Scite, ...) did "forget" that final EOL, which was not very appreciated.
Not only that, but they interpreted that final EOL incorrectly, as 'start a new line', and actually start to display another line as if it already existed.
This was very visible with a 'proper' text file with a well-behaved text editor like vim, compared to opening it in one of the above editors. It displayed an extra line below the real last line of the file. You see something like this:

1 first line
2 middle line
3 last line
4
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1  
+1. I've found this SO question while experiencing this very issue. It is very annoying of Eclipse to show this "fake" last line, and If I remove it, then git (and all other unix tools that expect EOL) complains. Also, note that this is not only in 2005: Eclipse 4.2 Juno still has this issue. –  MestreLion Aug 28 '13 at 8:57
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Some tools expect this. For example, wc expects this:

$ echo -n "Line not ending in a new line" | wc -l
0
$ echo "Line ending with a new line" | wc -l
1
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I would not say "some", I say most tools expect that for text files, if not all. cat, git, diff, wc, grep, sed... the list is huge –  MestreLion Aug 28 '13 at 9:02
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Basically there are many programs which will not process files correctly if they don't get the final EOL EOF.

GCC warns you about this because it's expected as part of the C standard. (section 5.1.1.2 apparently)

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/72271/no-newline-at-end-of-file-compiler-warning

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GCC isn't incapable of processing the file, it has to give the warning as part of the C standard. –  Bill the Lizard Apr 8 '09 at 12:27
    
Good point, updated with the appropriate section) –  altCognito Apr 8 '09 at 12:31
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This originates from the very early days when simple terminals were used. The newline char was used to trigger a 'flush' of the transferred data.

Today, the newline char isn't required anymore. Sure, many apps still have problems if the newline isn't there, but I'd consider that a bug in those apps.

If however you have a text file format where you require the newline, you get simple data verification very cheap: if the file ends with a line that has no newline at the end, you know the file is broken. With only one extra byte for each line, you can detect broken files with high accuracy and almost no CPU time.

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nowadays the newline at EOF for text files may not be a requirement, but it is a useful convention that makes most unix tools work together with consistent results. It's not a bug at all. –  MestreLion Aug 28 '13 at 9:08
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Presumably simply that some parsing code expected it to be there.

I'm not sure I would consider it a "rule", and it certainly isn't something I adhere to religiously. Most sensible code will know how to parse text (including encodings) line-by-line (any choice of line endings), with-or-without a newline on the last line.

Indeed - if you end with a new line: is there (in theory) an empty final line between the EOL and the EOF? One to ponder...

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It's not a rule, it's a convention: a line is something that ends with an end-of-line. So no, there is no "empty final line" between EOL and EOF. –  MestreLion Aug 28 '13 at 9:11
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There's also a practical programming issue with files lacking newlines at the end: The read Bash built-in (I don't know about other read implementations) doesn't work as expected:

printf $'foo\nbar' | while read line
do
    echo $line
done

This prints only foo! The reason is that when read encounters the last line, it writes the contents to $line but returns exit code 1 because it reached EOF. This breaks the while loop, so we never reach the echo $line part. If you want to handle this situation, you have to do the following:

while read line || [ -n "${line-}" ]
do
    echo $line
done < <(printf $'foo\nbar')

That is, do the echo if the read failed because of a non-empty line at end of file. Naturally, in this case there will be one extra newline in the output which was not in the input.

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I was always under the impression the rule came from the days when parsing a file without an ending newline was difficult. That is, you would end up writing code where an end of line was defined by the EOL character or EOF. It was just simpler to assume a line ended with EOL.

However I believe the rule is derived from C compilers requiring the newline. And as pointed out on “No newline at end of file” compiler warning, #include will not add a newline.

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I personally like new lines at the end of source code files.

It may have its origin with Linux or all UNIX systems for that matter. I remember there compilation errors (gcc if I'm not mistaken) because source code files did not end with an empty new line. Why was it made this way one is left to wonder.

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Imagine that the file is being processed while the file is still being generated by another process.

It might have to do with that? A flag that indicates that the file is ready to be processed.

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Files should not necessarily end with a new line.

For example, my signature files used by my email client don't end with a new line because if they would, my email message would have an empty line at the end and I don't like it.

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What? Files should not necessarily end with a new line, because you don't like it? Really?! –  Andrew Larsson Nov 30 '12 at 17:11
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My answer is "Files should not necessarily end with a new line". I just give an example where my file does not end in a new line. There is absolutely nothing that forces you to have a new line at the end of your files. –  Oli Feb 1 '13 at 7:23
    
This question was really about source files, though. I wasn't the one that downvoted you, by the way. –  Andrew Larsson Feb 1 '13 at 16:38
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No problem. The question (and the tags) doesn't explicitly mention source files. So I assumed it was general text files. –  Oli Feb 7 '13 at 15:53
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Your email client is broken if it displays an empty line for a EOL+EOF sequence. –  MestreLion Aug 28 '13 at 9:14
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IMHO, it's a matter of personal style and opinion.

In olden days, I didn't put that newline. A character saved means more speed through that 14.4K modem.

Later, I put that newline so that it's easier to select the final line using shift+downarrow.

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