Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class which looks like as follows;

public class AccommPropertyRepository : IAccommPropertyRepository {

    public AccommPropertyRepository() { 
    }

    public AccommPropertyRepository(int _accommPropertyID) {
        accommPropertyID = _accommPropertyID;
    }

    private readonly int accommPropertyID;
    private Guid _accommpropertyguid;

    public AccommProperty GetSingle(int id) { 

      //Logic sits here and returns single AccommProperty class

    }

    public Guid AccommPropertyGUID {

        get {

            var model = GetSingle(accommPropertyID);
            _accommpropertyguid = model.AccommPropertyGUID;

            return _accommpropertyguid;
        }
        set {
        }
    }

}

As you can see, there is a public property called AccommPropertyGUID. I have tested the code, it returns what it should but I am not sure my code is written in a right way.

Did I implement the structure right here?

UPDATE:

My aim here is to be able to call this class as follows;

var poo = new AccommPropertyRepository(1000);
var pooGUID = poo.AccommPropertyGUID;
share|improve this question
    
What are your concerns with this code? –  Oded Sep 4 '11 at 9:11
2  
What are you trying to implement? You cannot ask whether your code is doing the right thing before defining what thing is. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 4 '11 at 9:11
    
@Darin see my updated answer for what I am trying to achieve –  tugberk Sep 4 '11 at 9:17
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Although the question is about the property here but if you look at a much abstract level i.e at the class level you will find something strange here. The class is used to represent the Repository for AccomProperty. Now a simple definition of a repository that it stores (abstracted by the underlying persistent store) a specific type of objects and allows you to perform some operations (like access, delete etc) on those objects. So using a repository like

var poo = new AccommPropertyRepository(1000);
var pooGUID = poo.AccommPropertyGUID;

isn't a good idea in my POV. As this code denotes that you are creating the repository object to access only one specific accomm property object which has id 1000 where as repository should allow access to the underling stored objects and not just to a single object. A better way to use repository would be something like:

var repo = new AccommPropertyRepository(repInitializationData) //initialization data can be something like conn string etc
var pooGUID = repo.GetAccommProperty(1000).GUID

This way accessing the GUID property is part of the object and not of the repository as the property is responsibility of the actual object and not the repository. Repository is there just to allow you to access the underlying sets of objects.

I hope this makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Poked me in the eye too. –  leppie Sep 4 '11 at 9:33
add comment

Your setter looks incorrect. You need to set _accommpropertyguid in it or remove it altogether. You can add validation on the passed in value. You need to decide if you want a setter on the property or not. Here is the simplest implementation:

set { _accommpropertyguid = value; } 

The getter looks OK to me, though without knowing more about the implementation of GetSingle it is difficult to tell.

In general, there should be no side effects to using the getter and it should be fast.

share|improve this answer
    
'GetSingle()' is a method which returns a single class AccommProperty . AccommProperty has some properties and one of them is 'AccommPropertyGUID' –  tugberk Sep 4 '11 at 9:19
    
@tugberk - My point is that it shouldn't do things like database access or other network activities. –  Oded Sep 4 '11 at 9:24
    
hmm, it is doing exactly what you are suggesting not to do. In view of performance? –  tugberk Sep 4 '11 at 9:25
    
@tugberk - And programmer expectations. When calling a property, you do not expect it to go to the DB or do intensive work. That's the kind of think you do in a constructor. –  Oded Sep 4 '11 at 9:26
    
ok, I get the idea. so I should have assigned the value to _accommpropertyguid inside the public AccommPropertyRepository(int _accommPropertyID) {...} method? –  tugberk Sep 4 '11 at 9:29
show 1 more comment

it looks fine, if you want to have a clear code you may remove the empty set block.

But i'm not sure about what will happen, if "accommPropertyID" is not assigned ? You have 2 constructors and the first one has not any assignment to "accommPropertyID" so that some of your functions may give error. You may use try-catch blogs or you have to assign a default value for "accommPropertyID" or you have to remove the first constructor.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you should do this instead

public Guid AccommPropertyGUID 
{
    get 
    {
         if(null != _accommpropertyguid)
             {
                 var model = GetSingle(accommPropertyID);
                 _accommpropertyguid = model.AccommPropertyGUID;
             }

          return _accommpropertyguid;
    }
}

In this way you won't have to recalculate _accommpropertyguid value each time

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.