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I'm facing segmentation fault in this program. The flow seems to be correct as I figured out it to be. Please, help me find out the error in this program.

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>

using namespace std; 

struct node 
{ 
    int data; 
    struct node* left; 
    struct node* right; 
}; 

typedef struct node* Node; 
void insert(Node,int); 
Node root = NULL; 
int main() 
{ 
    insert(root,2); 
    insert(root,1); 
    insert(root,3); 

    cout<<root->data<<" "<<root->left->data<<" "<<root->right->data<<endl; 
    return 0; 
} 

void insert(Node nod,int val) 
{ 
    if(nod == NULL) 
    {
        Node newnode = new(struct node); 
        newnode->data = val; 
        newnode->left = NULL; 
        newnode->right = NULL; 
        nod = newnode; 
        if(root == NULL) 
        { 
            root = newnode; 
        } 
    } 
    else if(nod->data > val) 
    { 
        insert(node->left,val); 
    } 
    else if(nod->data < val) 
    {  
        insert(nod->right,val); 
    } 
}
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1  
formatting.......what error? –  Mitch Wheat Sep 4 '11 at 10:23
    
Uhh... I would try to reformat it but there are so many `s. Uhh... –  quasiverse Sep 4 '11 at 10:30
    
Note: There was an edit by Mathew that changed the actual code. –  quasiverse Sep 4 '11 at 10:43
2  
Some braces were lost in an edit, I've added them back. –  interjay Sep 4 '11 at 10:44
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2 Answers 2

There is nothing that actually sets root->left or root->right. The calls to insert(node->left, val) are not doing what you think it will do. In order to actually modify the left and right pointers, you need to pass the address of the pointers to insert. i.e. insert(&node->left, val), and change insert to handle it.

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yes, you can see it by looking to see whether node->left or node->right appear as L-values; the only thing they are ever set to is NULL, so you know this code isn't building a tree, as is apparently the intent. –  JustJeff Sep 4 '11 at 11:17
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it is simple. Change your insert to:

void insert(Node &nod,int val) 
{ 
  if(nod == NULL) {

    Node newnode = new(struct node); 
    newnode->data = val; 
    newnode->left = NULL; 
    newnode->right = NULL; 
    nod = newnode; 
  } 
  else if(nod->data > val) 
    { 
      insert(nod->left,val); 
    } 
  else if(nod->data < val) 
    {  
      insert(nod->right,val); 
    } 
}
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2  
You should outline your changes rather than handing them a chunk of code. –  quasiverse Sep 4 '11 at 10:46
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