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Attempting to write a constructor for LinkedList to be initialised with an array of integers.

The program would call linked(array); which will add all the values within the array in to a linkedlist.

LinkedList::LinkedList(int array[])
{
    headPtr->setData(array[0]); //setData method stores the integer at position 0 inside headPtr

    Node *currentPtr = headPtr;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.length(); ++i)    //for loop to add the integers to the next node
    {
        currentPtr->setNext(new Node(array[i])); //creates a new node with the integer value of array position i
    }
}

the trouble is the array.length (coming from Java) and I don't think the array length can be obtained this way?

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6  
Re: "coming from java" - Stop. Pick up a good introductory C++ book and read through it to learn proper, modern C++. C++ is not Java. Thinking in terms of Java when programming in C++ will give you nothing but nightmares. –  In silico Sep 4 '11 at 11:14
2  
You can't get the length of a C-array (unless it is terminated by something, like a C-string is). You can get it from an std::vector<int>, for example. –  user142019 Sep 4 '11 at 11:15
    
@WTP: You can get the length of C-Array. However, you cannot get the length if the array has been decayed into pointer. The OP is facing the latter situation. –  Nawaz Sep 4 '11 at 11:27
    
Note that since you never change currentPtr inside the for loop, the currentPtr->setNext repeatedly changes the first node. The other nodes are left untouched. This is probably not what you want. –  fredoverflow Sep 4 '11 at 11:39
    
@FredOverflow - I believe I have fixed it with this. added currentPtr = currentPtr->getNextPtr(); havnt tested it yet, trying to fix the other errors :P –  Cheeseman Sep 4 '11 at 12:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Like others have said, it is not only important but vital that you get a good introductory C++ book and read it from front to back, simultaneously trying to forget what you know about Java while in C++ mode. They are not remotely similar.

Now to your problem, it can be solved by using std::vector and using its size method:

// put this with the other includes for your file
#include <vector>

LinkedList::LinkedList(const std::vector<int>& array)
{
    headPtr->setData(array[0]); //setData method stores the integer at position 0 inside headPtr

    Node *currentPtr = headPtr;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.size(); ++i)    //for loop to add the integers to the next node
    {
        currentPtr->setNext(new Node(array[i])); //creates a new node with the integer value of array position i
    }
}

If you don't want to use vector, you have to pass in the size of the array to the function:

LinkedList::LinkedList(int array[], int arrlen)
{
    headPtr->setData(array[0]); //setData method stores the integer at position 0 inside headPtr

    Node *currentPtr = headPtr;

    for (int i = 0; i < arrlen; ++i)    //for loop to add the integers to the next node
    {
        currentPtr->setNext(new Node(array[i])); //creates a new node with the integer value of array position i
    }
}

But it is recommended to use the vector version.

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Thanks a lot, I have a book I am reading at the moment and it's the the tutorial exercise I am trying to do, their example is a bit different, might need to get a couple of different books :P I seem to have added your suggestion with the vector ok but i got a warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions. Not quite sure what it means with signed and unsigned... –  Cheeseman Sep 4 '11 at 11:37
    
@Cheeseman that means you are comparing a number that can be negative with a number that cannot be negative. The number that cannot be negative can hold an higher positive value because it's not wasting space that is reserved for negative values. This means that when you get up to a certain size, adding one to an unsigned value will get you the next higher value, where adding one to a signed value is undefined behaviour. vector::size returns an unsigned int. To fix the error, change for (int i = 0; i < array.size(); ++i) to for (unsigned int i = 0; i < array.size(); ++i) –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '11 at 11:55
    
ah that makes sense, thanks Seth :) So to call it, LinkedList list2(arr); should be fine? –  Cheeseman Sep 4 '11 at 12:00
    
@Cheeseman yes, that will be fine, if arr is a vector. If you decided to go with the second version I wrote, then you'd have to pass the length, like LinkedList list(arr, 5) or something (where 5 is the number of elements in the array). –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '11 at 12:07

I would suggest you to use iterator idiom, and make the constructor a templated constructor as:

class LinkedList
{
    //...
    public:
    template<typename FwdIterator>
    LinkedList(FwdIterator begin, FwdIterator end)
    {
       for (;begin != end; ++begin) 
       {
          //treat begin as pointer, and *begin as dereferenced object
       }
    }
    //...
};

And then you can use it as:

int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};

LinkedList lnklist(arr, arr+10);

Not only that. If you've std::vector<int>, then you can also use it to construct the linked list, as:

std::vector<int> v;
//..
LinkedList lnklist(v.begin(), v.end());

So using iterator idiom gives you this much power and flexibility. :-)

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As Nawaz explained, going with iterator solution is better. But if you want to go with array ( static one though), then compiler can automatically deduce the size for you.

template<size_t size>
LinkedList::LinkedList(int (&array)[size]) 
{ 
    headPtr->setData(array[0]); //setData method stores the integer at position 0 inside headPtr 

    Node *currentPtr = headPtr; 

    for (int i = 0; i < size++i)    //for loop to add the integers to the next node 
    { 
        currentPtr->setNext(new Node(array[i])); //creates a new node with the integer value of array position i 
    } 
} 

Can be called as shown below.

int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};   

LinkedList lnklist(arr);
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