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I have 2 files namely fun.cpp and main.cpp

fun.cpp

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void sum()
{
    cout << "hello";
}

Main.cpp

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include "fun.cpp"
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

sum();

    return 0;
}

When I run the above code in netbeans, I get this output

"/usr/bin/make" -f nbproject/Makefile-Debug.mk QMAKE= SUBPROJECTS= .build-conf
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5'
"/usr/bin/make"  -f nbproject/Makefile-Debug.mk dist/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/adbms_v1.5
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5'
mkdir -p dist/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86
g++     -o dist/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/adbms_v1.5 build/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/fun.o build/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/main.o  
build/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/main.o: In function `sum()':
/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5/fun.cpp:5: multiple definition of `sum()'
build/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/fun.o:/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5/fun.cpp:5: first defined here
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make[2]: *** [dist/Debug/GNU-Linux-x86/adbms_v1.5] Error 1
make[1]: *** [.build-conf] Error 2
make: *** [.build-impl] Error 2
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5'
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ravi/NetBeansProjects/ADBMS_v1.5'

BUILD FAILED (exit value 2, total time: 150ms)

Can anyone explain what the problem is??

Thanks in advance..

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If some answer helps you resolve your problem, You should consider accepting that answer. Currently, you have a 0% Accept Rate, which is well fretted in the SO community here. –  Alok Save Sep 10 '11 at 7:18
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2 Answers 2

Do not include cpp file which has function defintion in other cpp files.
This causes multiple function definitions of the same functions and breaks the One definition Rule.

Put the declaration of the function in an header file and then include that header file in whichever source file you want to use the function.

fun.h

#ifndef HEADER_FUN_H
#define HEADER_FUN_H

void sum();

#endif //HEADER_FUN_H

fun.cpp

#include "fun.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void sum()
{
    cout << "hello";
}

Main.cpp

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include "fun.h"
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv) 
{
    sum();
    return 0;
}
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Each .cpp file and all the files that the .cpp file includes is called a translation unit. The compiler compiles each translation unit separately. The linker then puts it all together into a single executable.

Before the compiler actually compiles the code, it executes all preprocessing statements first, for example, the #include statements in both your .cpp files. The #include statement simply takes the contents of the specified file and "copies" it into the file where the #include statement is. For example, fun.cpp may look like this after preprocessing:

/* the contents of the iostream file goes here */
using namespace std; 
void sum() 
{ 
    cout << "hello"; 
} 

For Main.cpp, something like this:

/* the contents of the cstdlib file goes here */
/* the contents of the iostream file goes here */
using namespace std; 
void sum() 
{ 
    cout << "hello"; 
} 
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{  
    sum();  
    return 0;  
}  

As you can see, the contents of fun.cpp has been "inserted" into Main.cpp. So now you have two definitions of sum(), which is a violation of the One Definition Rule (ODR) in C++. Since the compiler processes each translation unit separately, this error wasn't found until the linker saw that you have two different definitions, and rightly complained as a result.

Since the sum() function is quite simple, one way to solve the problem is to make the sum() function inline, rename the fun.cpp file into fun.h, and include fun.h into Main.cpp instead of fun.cpp.

// fun.h
#include <iostream>
inline void sum()
{
    std::cout << "hello";
}

// main.cpp
#include <cstdlib>         
#include <iostream>         
#include "fun.h" // Note "fun.h" 

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{         
    sum();
    return 0;
}

For bigger functions, or if you want to hide the implementation, Als' answer is more appropriate.

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