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I'm doing the following in my controller:

def publish
  respond_to |format|
    format.js do
      if allowed_to_publish then
        render :js => 'alert("successful");'
      else
        render :js => 'alert("error");'
      end
    end
  end
end

Clients access the methods with an ajax-request. This works good so far, the only thing that bugs me is, that the status code of the response is always "200".

When there's an error and the request cannot be fulfilled, it should be a 4xx or 5xx response depending on the type of error. In my case, publish can go wrong when a user does not enter all required details. The correct status code for this, I think, is 412 precondition failed.

Now, when I change the status code, it does not execute the javascript anymore:

def publish
  respond_to |format|
    format.js do
      if allowed_to_publish then
        render :js => 'alert("successful");'
      else
        render :js => 'alert("error");', :status => 412
      end
    end
  end
end

The client gets the same response but the status code, and does not execute the javascript anymore. Response headers are the following:

Date    Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:29:58 GMT
Server  Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu)
X-Powered-By    Phusion Passenger (mod_rails/mod_rack) 3.0.8
X-UA-Compatible IE=Edge
Cache-Control   no-cache
X-Runtime   0.176543
Status  412
Strict-Transport-Security   max-age=172800, includeSubDomains
Keep-Alive  timeout=15, max=100
Connection  Keep-Alive
Transfer-Encoding   chunked
Content-Type    text/javascript; charset=utf-8

and body is still the alert("error");. But it does not alert.

Is this a browser restriction (I'm using Firefox 7b), or can this be made to work with rails?

Must I always use 200 if I want to have my javascript to be executed?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If anything other than 200 causes trouble, why not just return that. Nobody will actually see the response code unless they are digging into the HTTP headers, anyway.

I don't know why it isn't working, but I honestly think you shouldn't make things too difficult for yourself.

After all, the HTTP request was successful, so an HTTP response of 200 is very appropriate indeed.

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Every status code has a meaning and 200 means The request was fulfilled successfully. When you are getting other 4xx or 5xx codes that means that there is some error there and the script has not run/returned a successful response. In that case you should not expect the same output, however you can handle this case in your Javascript code and display some meaningful message incase something wrong occured with the request.

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yeah, that is exactly what I do in my first example without the 412-response. But if there is an error, it shouldn't respond with 200 successful! Because, well, it is not successful. But this seems to break the javascript parsing. –  markus Sep 4 '11 at 13:15
    
Can you please post your javascript code which is handling the response? –  Ankit Jaiswal Sep 4 '11 at 13:20
1  
@markus: I would say that the HTTP status code is just semantical. It doesn't hurt if you just return 200. –  pimvdb Sep 4 '11 at 13:29
    
@Ankit Jaiswal: I replaced my partials by plain javascript alert boxes. I simply want the alerts to fire off. –  markus Sep 4 '11 at 13:35
    
@pimvdb: Just feels wrong to me to do that. Maybe I've to live with that, though. –  markus Sep 4 '11 at 13:36

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