Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to PHP and I'm currently working my way through this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/PHP-MySQL-Development-Developers-Library/dp/0672329166

So I'm at Chapter 6: Object-oriented PHP and I'm finding this topic really difficult to comprehend.

Firstly, what does

    public function __set($name, $value)
{
    $this->$name = $value;
}

do? Same goes for __get.

After reading most of the chapter and not really understanding it, I thought I'd try and implement classes and objects in my site so I could maybe understand through experimentation.

I haven't gotten very far :D

Here's what I've got (class_lib.php):

<?php
class Page
{
    public $header = "<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN\"\n
    \"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd\">\n
    <html xmlns=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml\">\n
    <head>\n
    <meta http-equiv=\"content-type\" content=\"text/html; charset=utf-8\" />";

    public function __set($name, $value)
    {
        $this->$name = $value;
    }

    public function Display() {
    $this -> DisplayHeader();
    }

    public DisplayHeader() {
    echo $this->header;
    }
}

?>

And (index.php):

<?php

require("class_lib.php");

$class = new Page();

$class->Display();

?>

The error I get when I load the file in Google Chrome is:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_STRING, expecting T_VARIABLE in C:\wamp\www\PS v3 (PHP)\class_lib.php on line 15

I suppose if I knew what __set meant, I might have stood a chance at figuring that part out.

Any answers / advice would be massively appreciated :)

share|improve this question
2  
You seem to be missing function in the declaration of DisplayHeader() –  NullUserException Sep 4 '11 at 15:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
class Test
{
    public function __get($name) 
    { 
        echo "= $name<br>";
        return "value";
    } 

    public function __set($name, $value) 
    { 
        echo "$name = $value<br>";
    } 

}

$test = new Test();
$test->setvar123 = "SETVALUE"; // will output "setvar123 = SETVALUE"
$var = $test->getvar123 // will output "= getvar123" and $var will be "value"

Basically, __get and __set are magic keywords that intercept any attempt to set and get a "variable" on the class that does not exist. Meaning, you can replace default get/set functionality with whatever you like... like storing the data in a separate array, outputting it, validating it, saving to a database, reading from a database, etc.

EDIT: Also public DisplayHeader() ... should be public function DisplayHeader() ...

To present another more practical example, this class allows you to only set a variable once, and throws an exception if you try to read one that does not exist or assign to one which is already set. Additionally, it also stores these variables in $data rather than the class itself.

class Test
{
    private $data = array();

    public function __get($name) 
    { 
        if (!isset($this->data[$name])) throw new Exception("key does not exist!");
        return $this->data[$name];
    } 

    public function __set($name, $value) 
    { 
        if (isset($this->data[$name])) throw new Exception("key already exists!");
        $this->data[$name] = $value;
    } 

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks so much! I'll give you the best answer seeing as you answered both questions I guess. Just one thing though, how is __get used to get a property if it doesn't exist? –  Dan Sep 4 '11 at 15:23
1  
@Dan if you define __get you also get to say how it should work. You could return NULL, you could throw an exception or return some default value. Or am I misunderstanding your question? PS. Do note, you don't have to define __get and in most cases you shouldn't, it's mostly useful if you want special functionality... it's not something you use every day. –  Andreas Sep 4 '11 at 15:26
    
@Dan I added a new example if it helps to answer your question. –  Andreas Sep 4 '11 at 15:30
1  
Jeff Atwood wrote an article on this very use of __get in Coding Horror: Properties vs. Public Variables for anyone who's interested. –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 15:39
    
@Andreas - sorry if I'm slow picking this up... So when "$class = new Page();" is executed, "$class" is placed in where __set() is? If that's right, what's the code within the brackets do? Sorry if I'm being completely slow and stupid here. –  Dan Sep 4 '11 at 16:14

To understand the answer to your question, you need to have a bit of background into object oriented programming.

A class can contain 'properties'. A property in this context is basically a piece of data which can be referenced from outside of the object.

If you declare a variable as public, then it is a property. In your code, you've declared $header as public, so you could access the $header variable for the $test object by $test->header.

You can get the value of $header by writing print $test->header;. Likewise, you can set the value of $header with the code $test->header = "new value";.

In other words, it works just like any other variable.

But what happens if, for example, you wanted to only allow $header to be read, but not changed? As a public property, the program calling the object can do whatever it likes to it.

This is where the magic functions __get and __set` come into play.

Using these functions, you can hide the actual $header variable by making it private instead of public, but still give access to it, under your own terms.

So, in the example, above, you could write a __get method which outputs the header variable, but not write a matching __set method. Or you could write one which validates that it meets your criteria when it is set.

So the answer to your question is that __get and __set are functions which allow you to hide the raw variables in your class and provide an abstracted way for the user to access them.

Another example is a class which has height and width properties, but you also want to give the user a convenient area property. You obviously don't want to have a separate variable for area, so you just write a __get method which returns the height multiplied by the width when the user asks for the area. Again, you wouldn't want to write a __set method for this. This could of course also be written as a function, but providing it as a property makes sense because it is a data value.

There are a lot of ways to use them, but that's the basics. I hope I've explained it well enough.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for putting in the time for the reply but Andreas did answer both questions and I understood his answer better I think. –  Dan Sep 4 '11 at 16:20

About your error, you are missing the function keyword in your Display function. Change

public DisplayHeader() {
    echo $this->header;
}

into

public function DisplayHeader() {
    echo $this->header;
}
share|improve this answer

Your error is because you left out the "function" when declaring DisplayHeader(). As for _get/_set check out http://us.php.net/__get to started.

__set() is run when writing data to inaccessible properties.

__get() is utilized for reading data from inaccessible properties.
share|improve this answer

Edit

Sorry about this, turns out I was totally wrong! The link is helpful anyway:

The PHP website is actually great and super helpful for beginners. Be sure to check it out! http://www.php.net/

share|improve this answer
    
$class->_set("var", "my new value"); $class->_set("mySecondVar", "another new value"); say what? You are not supposed to call __get and __set, they are "magic keywords" and are invoked by PHP. –  Andreas Sep 4 '11 at 15:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.