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I have a person class which has a name and a list of friends in HashSet.

I want to override an equals method for this Person class. Below is what I have written so far.

But I am unsure about this because, I know that HashSet does not necessarily have to be in order, and I also heard that I have to override HashCode method.

What modifications should I make in below codes to correctly implement equals method?

public boolean equals(Note target){
    if(this.name==target.getName() && this.friends == target.getFriends()){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

public HashSet<Person> getFriends(){
    return this.friends;
}

edit

//override hashCode()
public int hashCode() {
    return name.hashCode() + friends.hashCode();
}
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1  
Make sure that you use the correct method signature if you intend to override equals (which you should), i.e. public boolean equals(Object obj) and then check for correct type, etc. By using Note as a parameter, you will overload equals, which is something else. –  matsev Sep 4 '11 at 16:29
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The == operator is definitely wrong for the HashSet and name. If you want to compare objects in java use the equals method. The == operator compares the internal object IDs managed by the JVM. The contract for HashSet's equals method is document in AbstractSet.equals().

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o){

    if (o instanceof Note) {
        Note target = (Note) o;
        if(this.name.equals(target.getName()) && this.friends.equals(target.getFriends())){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

You may want to check for null's as well, maybe name and fiends can be null.

A lot has been writen regarding equals and hashCode. The best way is to look into the JavaDoc for lava.lang.Object.equals().

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I got a comment in my question that I have to receive (Object target) as a parameter. Will it be fine if I still use (Note target) as a input parameter? –  user482594 Sep 4 '11 at 17:00
    
Ups, I missed that, @matsev is right, I updated the answer. I also added @Override annotation which enforces a compiler check to verify that Note overrides a method defined in one of its subclasses (in this case java.lang.Object). –  home Sep 4 '11 at 17:07
    
Hey, Thanks for your help. I also have to override the hashCode() method, right? I have added hashCode in the question above by editing the question. Can you skim through it if that is okay? –  user482594 Sep 4 '11 at 17:15
    
No prob. hashCode looks fine. it's important to understand that a hash code must not guarantee uniqueness. It is a helper for Java's built-in hash functionality. So you should design your hashCode methods in a way that avoids hash collision wherever possible: download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… –  home Sep 4 '11 at 17:20
    
Hey.. I found a problem here. If one of elements in this.friends has added this in its friends list, there is a recursion getting hashCode. (if 2 friends are in mutual friends) Does that mean I should not include friends in hashCode return? –  user482594 Sep 4 '11 at 20:50
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The way you currently have your equals(Note) method setup, it will (almost) never return true. When working with String objects you should always use equals(String), never ==.

I would create my Note.equals(Note) method something like this:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj){
    if(obj instanceof Note) {
        Note target = (Note) obj;
        if(name.equals(target.name) && friends.containsAll(target.friends)
              && friends.size() == target.friends.size()){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

You will notice that the equals(Note) method I provided above also doesn't do friends.equals(target.getFriends()). This is because you are comparing the containing HashSet, and not the contents of the HashSet.

Finally, if you want your Note class to hash properly, you will also need to override your hashCode() method. You can read more about this contract in the description of the hashCode() method in the Object documentation.

public int hashCode() {
    return name.hashCode() + friends.hashCode();
}
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What if I have more than 1 hashSet (other than friends) used in a class variables? Do I just add them up in the hashCode() statement as well? –  user482594 Sep 4 '11 at 16:33
    
If they are going to be used to calculate your equals(Object) method, then they should also be used in your hashCode() calculation. –  nicholas.hauschild Sep 4 '11 at 17:12
    
Thank you for your hashCode implementation. It gave me a lot of helps –  user482594 Sep 4 '11 at 17:16
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