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Our application receives log files via email and so the lines are often broken up by the email client. Once I've read the body of the email in I have a string variable $log in the following format.

Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2] 
PKCS11] built Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security 2' 
or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 
Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key' as a OpenVPN static key file 
Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Outgoing Control Channel Authentication: Using 160 
bit message hash 'SHA1' for HMAC authentication Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 
2011 Incoming Control Channel Authentication: Using 160 bit message hash 'SHA1'
for HMAC authentication Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 LZO compression initialized 
Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Control Channel MTU parms [ L:1558 D:166 EF:66 EB:0 
ET:0 EL:0 ] Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Socket Buffers: R=[8192->8192] S=[8192->8192]

As shown above the date does not always start on a newline. I'd like to generate an array containing the dates and log messages so that I can output a table with these fields in their own columns. I understand that I would need a regex to match the date field but how do I go about building the array?

share|improve this question
1  
You don't ever 'need' a regex. It is convenient for some applications, and useless for others. But first of all, you need to find a set of rules that apply to this log. As of now, I see just a date/time, and after that either an application, or another message, prefixed with a label (like NOTE) and a colon. It there any other structure in this data? How far do you want to go in splitting it? –  GolezTrol Sep 4 '11 at 19:39
    
I simply need to split it into 1) the Date and 2) the message that follows up until the next date field. –  Michelle Sep 4 '11 at 19:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm just going to update my answer with a new version entirely, since the example log file has changed a lot. Since the log seems to be line broken just about anywhere, this approach - now including a bit of regexp works:

$log="Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2]  
PKCS11] built Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security 2'  
or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011  
Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key' as a OpenVPN static key file  
Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Outgoing Control Channel Authentication: Using 160  
bit message hash 'SHA1' for HMAC authentication Fri Aug 26 11:52:30  
2011 Incoming Control Channel Authentication: Using 160 bit message hash 'SHA1' 
for HMAC authentication Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 LZO compression initialized  
Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Control Channel MTU parms [ L:1558 D:166 EF:66 EB:0  
ET:0 EL:0 ] Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011 Socket Buffers: R=[8192->8192] S=[8192->8192] 
";
$str = implode(' ',preg_split("/[ ]*[\r\n]+/", $log));
$arrLogLines=preg_split('/[ ]*([\w]{3} [\w]{3} [0-9]{2} [\d:]+ \d{4}) /',$str,-1,PREG_SPLIT_DELIM_CAPTURE); // Cred to Herbert for the regexp, seems to work fine..
array_shift($arrLogLines);
for ($i=0;$i<sizeof($arrLogLines);$i++) {
    if (($i/2)==(int)($i/2)) {
        $offset=0;
        $strArrIdx='date';
    } else {
        $offset=1;
        $strArrIdx='message';
    }
    $arrLogMessages[($i-$offset)/2][$strArrIdx]=$arrLogLines[$i];
}
var_dump($arrLogMessages);

It produces the expected:

array(8) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(56) "OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2] PKCS11] built"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(102) "NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security 2' or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(75) "Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key' as a OpenVPN static key file"
  }
  [3]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(98) "Outgoing Control Channel Authentication: Using 160 bit message hash 'SHA1' for HMAC authentication"
  }
  [4]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(98) "Incoming Control Channel Authentication: Using 160 bit message hash 'SHA1' for HMAC authentication"
  }
  [5]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(27) "LZO compression initialized"
  }
  [6]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(63) "Control Channel MTU parms [ L:1558 D:166 EF:66 EB:0 ET:0 EL:0 ]"
  }
  [7]=>
  array(2) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(24) "Fri Aug 26 11:52:30 2011"
    ["message"]=>
    string(46) "Socket Buffers: R=[8192->8192] S=[8192->8192] "
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
See the question: "[…] the date does not always start on a newline"! If it were, this would be a good solution. –  feeela Sep 4 '11 at 20:31
    
True, I assumed it was a regular log file with the rows intact. Edited my reply to work with the example provided. –  Bing Sep 4 '11 at 20:50
    
Are you referring to "Mar 12 2011"? If so, that's not a date field. It's part of the message. Other than that, all the dates in the example you gave start a new line. –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 20:53
    
@Herbert, I think that all the log dates start at a new line, but not every new line starts with a log date - the lines are wrapped with \n every now and then. My solution fixes the lines first and then turns them into an array. It works for the data provided in it's "broken" form and doesn't require any regexp. –  Bing Sep 4 '11 at 21:13
    
@Bing, didn't catch your reply b4 I posted my answer. That's what I was thinking but the OP insisted "the date does not always start on a newline" so I wanted to verify that. –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 21:16

I'm not a regex pro and sure there is an easier way, but this works:

$input = "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2]
[PKCS11] built on Mar 12 2011
Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security
2' or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables
Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key'
as a OpenVPN static key file";

preg_match_all('/([\w]{3} [\w]{3} [0-9]{2} [0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2} [0-9]{4}) (.*)/', $input, $matches, PREG_SET_ORDER);

var_dump($matches);

This results in:

array(3) {
    [0] =>
    array(3) {
        [0] =>
        string(67) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2]"
        [1] =>
        string(24) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011"
        [2] =>
        string(42) "OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2]"
    }
    [1] =>
    array(3) {
        [0] =>
        string(70) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security"
        [1] =>
        string(24) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011"
        [2] =>
        string(45) "NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security"
    }
    [2] =>
    array(3) {
        [0] =>
        string(71) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key'"
        [1] =>
        string(24) "Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011"
        [2] =>
        string(46) "Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key'"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
They're missing the second line. e.g. [PKCS11] built on Mar 12 2011 –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 20:34
    
True, I think that should be possible using negative lookaheads. –  feeela Sep 4 '11 at 21:23

I believe this is what you're looking for:

<?php

$log = <<<LOG
Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2] 
[PKCS11] built on Mar 12 2011
Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security 
2' or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables
Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011 Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key' 
as a OpenVPN static key file
LOG;


function splitLog($log)
{
    $log = str_replace("\n",'~',$log);
    $log = str_replace("\r",'',$log);
    $log .= '~';
    preg_match_all('/([\w]{3} [\w]{3} [0-9]{2} [\d:]+ \d{4})((?:.*?~){2})/', $log, $m);

    $logArray = array();

    foreach($m[0] as $k=>$v)
    {
        $a['date'] = $m[1][$k];
        $a['message'] = trim(str_replace('~', '', $m[2][$k]));
        array_push($logArray, $a);
    }

    return $logArray;
}

$logArray = splitLog($log);
var_dump($logArray);

?>

Output

array
  0 => 
    array
      'date' => string 'Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011' (length=24)
      'message' => string 'OpenVPN 2.1.4 i686-pc-mingw32 [SSL] [LZO2] [PKCS11] built on Mar 12 2011' (length=72)
  1 => 
    array
      'date' => string 'Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011' (length=24)
      'message' => string 'NOTE: OpenVPN 2.1 requires '--script-security 2' or higher to call user-defined scripts or executables' (length=102)
  2 => 
    array
      'date' => string 'Wed Aug 03 13:56:31 2011' (length=24)
      'message' => string 'Control Channel Authentication: using 'ta.key' as a OpenVPN static key file' (length=75)
share|improve this answer
    
This is a hack job I threw together, so it could probably be improved, but it works! I tested it against your data. –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 21:21
    
Nice workaround, to replace the line-breaks, but it will work only if the message are on two lines each. If a message spans just one line, or three lines, that message won't be included in the results. –  feeela Sep 4 '11 at 21:22
    
@feeela: Thanx. It feels like a hack though. :) –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 21:25
    
@feeela - Btw: I borrowed your RegEx and shortened it a tiny bit. Hope I didn't step on your toes. –  Herbert Sep 4 '11 at 21:31
    
Thanks but this is only working if the log message isn't broken by a newline, which it often is. Whatever is after the newline is truncated. –  Michelle Sep 5 '11 at 0:34

If every line starts with a date like this, you can just use substr. The date exists on every line and always with the same length. Alright, the first line ends with a sate too, but that has a different meaning and a different notation. Regex isn't gonna help you with that either.

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