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How do I get the "dereferenced type" of another type in C++03? Note that it can be other dereferenceable type like std::vector<int>::iterator.

e.g. if I have

template<typename T>
struct MyPointer
{
    T p;
    ??? operator *() { return *p; }
};

How can I figure out what to replace the ??? with?

(No Boost! I want to know how to figure it out myself.)

share|improve this question
    
@Downvoter: Care to comment? – Mehrdad Sep 4 '11 at 21:34
    
Why not make the T the type that is being pointed at. That why you will know both the pointer type T* p and the type to return T operator*() – Loki Astari Sep 4 '11 at 22:13
    
@Tux-D: Because you can't assume p is a pointer. – Mehrdad Sep 4 '11 at 23:13
    
I must be missing something. I am saying you can explicitly make it a pointer by making T the type that is pointed at. Thus you define p as 'T* p'. – Loki Astari Sep 4 '11 at 23:31
2  
@Tux-D Mehrdad is saying that he doesn't want to restrict the templatized type to pointers only, since non-pointer types may overload operator* as well. – Dawson Sep 4 '11 at 23:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the general case, you can't. For raw pointers, you can partially specialize as shown in other answers- custom smart pointers may have a common typedef for the result type. However, you cannot write a single function that will cope with any pointer in C++03.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like the correct answer, as much as I wasn't hoping for it to be. :) Thanks! – Mehrdad Sep 4 '11 at 21:35
1  
@DeadMG: can't the return type simply be typename std::iterator_traits<T>::value_type? Anything passed to a MyPointer class should probably also overload iterator_traits. – Mooing Duck Nov 17 '11 at 20:44
template<typename>
struct dereference;

template<typename T>
struct dereference<T*>
{
    typedef typename T type;
};

template<typename T>
struct MyPointer
{
    T p;
    typename dereference<T>::type operator *() { return *p; }
};
share|improve this answer
3  
@Paul: Mehrdad asked how do dereference a type, I provided an answer. – fredoverflow Sep 4 '11 at 21:01
1  
@Mehrdad: Sure I can, the compiler will complain if you supply a non-pointer type. – fredoverflow Sep 4 '11 at 21:02
3  
This looks best. However, what about types that overload operator*? – UncleBens Sep 4 '11 at 21:02
1  
@Mehrdad: Do you want your program to work with non-pointer types that have an overloaded operator*, or do you want it to fail for those types? – fredoverflow Sep 4 '11 at 21:46
1  
Is there not a standard naming convention that recommends a type have the typedef(s) value_type/pointer_type/reference_type if it overloads operators like *? If you make that assumption then you can a default version of deference. It if they don't follow that convention you still get a compiler error (best of both worlds). Anyway +1, – Loki Astari Sep 5 '11 at 0:04

You can have a simple construct which recursively removes all the pointers from a given type as below:

template<typename T>
struct ActualType { typedef T type; };
template<typename T>
struct ActualType<T*> { typedef typename ActualType<T>::type type; };

Below is the inline wrapper function to recursively find out the actual value from a given pointer or non-pointer types;

template<typename T>
typename ActualType<T>::type ActualValue (const T &obj) { return obj; }
template<typename T>
typename ActualType<T>::type ActualValue (T *p) { return ActualValue(*p); }

And just use it as:

template<typename T>
struct MyPointer
{
  T p;
  typename ActualType<T>::type operator *() { return ActualValue(p); }
//^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
};

In this example, it removes all the pointers from a given type, but as per the need you can configure the ActualType<> and ActualValue<>. There won't be any compiler error even if you declare MyPointer<> with a non-pointer type.

Here is a working demo for a single pointer and no pointer types.

share|improve this answer
    
But that has the problem described in the comments to Paul Manta's old answer. It doesn't work for types that are not pointer types. operator* can be overloaded for a non-pointer type. – jogojapan Jan 23 '13 at 3:18
    
@jogojapan, it will work. See the edited answer with demo. – iammilind Jan 23 '13 at 3:37
    
That seems to be a special case, where MyPointer<T> has its operator* defined such it returns an object of type ActualType<T>::type. But how do you get this to work if you have an arbitrary class, with an operator* that returns an arbitrary data type? – jogojapan Jan 23 '13 at 3:50
    
@jogojapan, then it will be a compiler error and I don't think OP has any intention to return any arbitrary type. One has to use ActualType<> and ActualValue<> in combination to get the real object type and value. – iammilind Jan 23 '13 at 3:55

You can do it like this, and it is ensured that the template will only compile when you pass pointers to it:

template<typename T>
struct MyPointer<T*>
{
    T* p;
    T operator*() { return *p; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But you cannot just assume that p is a pointer. – Mehrdad Sep 4 '11 at 21:01
    
@Mehrad Yes you can. In fact you are sure of it. Look at the second line of the code, and see the specialization of the template. – Paul Manta Sep 4 '11 at 21:02
1  
I mean you cannot assume that p is a pointer in my example. It may simply be that p has operator* overloaded instead. – Mehrdad Sep 4 '11 at 21:03

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