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I was trying do some file read/write stuff and I am unable to run my second getline command. Any ideas as to why this happens?

char str[80];
char substr[10];
file.open("abc.txt", fstream::in);

    file.getline(str,'\n');
      while(!file.eof())
    {
        i=0;
        while(str[i]!='\n') {substr[i] = str[i++]; }

        substr[i++]='\n'; 
        cout<<substr;

        file.getline(str,'\n');

    }

abc.txt

AND 1 2 3
NAND 4 5 6
NOR 2 3 7
XOR 1 6 8
OR 8 7 9

I used notepad++ to create the txt file, so am pretty sure there are CR/LF at the end of each line

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can you print the contents of abc.txt? If there is a single line, it won't ever run the loop –  Foo Bah Sep 4 '11 at 20:54
    
while !eof is almost always wrong. In this case you're actually not abusing it, but I'd still not recommend doing it this way. Also, what's wrong with std::string? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 4 '11 at 23:32
    
What does "unable to run" mean? What happens? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 4 '11 at 23:33

3 Answers 3

2nd argument of fstream::getline is the streamsize, not delimiter. For delimited version, you need the overloaded version. See this reference.

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Following up with my comment, try moving the file.getline command within the while loop:

...
while(!file.eof())
{
    file.getline(str,80,'\n');
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
I brought it in..nothing changed. –  noob Sep 4 '11 at 21:04
1  
@noob i could be mistaken, but i thought getline took a length argument before the delimiter ... –  Foo Bah Sep 4 '11 at 21:08
    
@noob also in your command, you have strings of longer than 10 characters (like the nand line). You probably want to increase the length of substr –  Foo Bah Sep 4 '11 at 21:11

This works. Use getline() in the while condition and get the string delimeted by '\n' and use strcpy.

char str[80] = { '\0' };   
char substr[80] = { '\0' };

ifstream file;
file.open("abc.txt", fstream::in); 


int i  = 0;
while(file.getline(str, 79, '\n'))   
{   
    strncpy(substr, str, 78);    
    substr[strlen(substr)]='\n';    
    cout<<substr;      
} 
share|improve this answer
    
what's wrong with this ? –  Jagannath Sep 5 '11 at 21:40
    
I think all answers here simply get a downvote –  LeleDumbo Sep 5 '11 at 22:02

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