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I am reading text from a text file, but I never reach eof, which results in an endless loop.

Here's what I wrote

static ifstream inF;
inF.open(file,ifstream::in);
cin.rdbuf(inF.rdbuf());
while (inF.good() && !inF.eof())
{
    addStudent(students);
}
if (inF.is_open())
{
    inF.close();
    inF.clear();
}

Every Iteration of the loop I call addStudents, which handles only one line. That works fine for me. Basically I rad lines in the form of D 98 76.5 66 45 (Possibly) 12000 here's the code:

static void addStudent(vector<Student*> students)
{
char institution;
unsigned short id;
double gAverage, pGrade, salary;
cin >> institution;

switch (institution)
{
case ALICE:
    cin >> id >> gAverage >> salary;
        students.push_back(new Student(institution,id,gAverage,salary));
        return;
case BOB:
    cin >> id >> gAverage >> salary;
    students.push_back(new Student(institution,id,gAverage,salary));
    return;
case COLIN:
    cin >> id >> gAverage >> pGrade >> salary;
    students.push_back(new                  CollegeStudent(institution,id,gAverage,pGrade,salary));
    return;
case DANNY:
cin >> id >> gAverage >>  pGrade >> salary;
    students.push_back(new CollegeStudent(institution,id,gAverage,pGrade,salary));
    return;
}
}

When I get to the end of the file the loop keeps running, and addStudents (which returns void) does nothing. Any Ideas why? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Please post the code for addStudent. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 4 '11 at 21:18
3  
Would need to also see addStudents - but its likely you are never incrementing the position of the original ifstream (its always at the beginning and will always return true for good() and !eof() –  Will Sep 4 '11 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

Your file stream may share it's stream buffer with cin, but it doesn't share it's flags. So when you read using cin's operator>>, and it the reaches end of the file, cin sets it's own eof flag, but it doesn't set the flag in your ifstream(how could it? it has no knowledge of it).

This is an awfully silly way to read a file, why are you doing it like that? Why don't you just pass an istream reference into your addStudent function and read from that?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, we were instructed to redirect input to a file, so that's what I did. I can use ifstream.getLine() but then I'm not making use of the redirection right? –  yotamoo Sep 4 '11 at 21:58
    
@yotamoo: You can do it like you're doing now, you just need to check for eof against cin, not inF, because the status of inF never changes. –  Benjamin Lindley Sep 4 '11 at 22:08
    
I think your teacher probably wanted you to directly process cin - so you could redirect output of other operations into it for processing (like making it part of a pipe). What you've done putting cin into another stream doesn't really make much sense programmatically :/ –  w00te Sep 4 '11 at 22:21

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