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There are some posts that asks what the difference between those two are already.
(why do I have to even mention this...)

But my question is different in a way that I am calling "throw ex" in another error god-like handling method.

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            // something
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            HandleException(ex);
        }
    }

    private static void HandleException(Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex is ThreadAbortException)
        {
            // ignore then,
            return;
        }

        if (ex is ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
        {
            // Log then,
            throw ex;
        }

        if (ex is InvalidOperationException)
        {
            // Show message then,
            throw ex;
        }

        // and so on.
    }
}

If try & catch were used in the Main, then I would use throw; to rethrow the error. But in the above simplied code, all exceptions go through HandleException

Does throw ex; has the same effect as calling throw when called inside HandleException?

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2  
There is a difference, it has to do with whether or how the stack trace appears in the exception, but I don't remember which is which right now so I won't list this an answer. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 8 '09 at 14:24
    
@Joel: Thanks. I guess using HandleError exception is a bad idea. I just wanted to refactor some error handling code. –  Sung Apr 8 '09 at 14:27
    
The third way is to wrap in a new exception and rethrow timwise.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/… –  Tim Abell May 10 at 10:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 195 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a difference;

  • throw ex resets the stack trace (so your errors would appear to originate from HandleException)
  • throw doesn't - the original offender would be preserved.
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9  
To expand on Marc's answer a bit, you can find more details here: geekswithblogs.net/sdorman/archive/2007/08/20/… –  Scott Dorman Apr 8 '09 at 14:38
    
@Scott: Thank you for the link. And I have also found out about how to extract error handler in the follow-up question: stackoverflow.com/questions/730300/… –  Sung Apr 8 '09 at 16:22
1  
@Shaul; no, it isn't. I've given details in a comment to your post. –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '09 at 12:05
1  
@Marc Gravell - my apologies, you were right. Sorry about the downvote; it's too late for me to undo... :( –  Shaul Apr 22 '09 at 18:08
1  
@Marc : It seems that throw preserves the original offender ONLY if the throw isn't in the method in which the initial exception was thrown (see this question : stackoverflow.com/questions/5152265/… ) –  Brann Mar 1 '11 at 9:17

(I posted earlier, and @Marc Gravell has corrected me)

Here's a demonstration of the difference:

    	static void Main(string[] args) {
		try {
			ThrowException1(); // line 19
		} catch (Exception x) {
			Console.WriteLine("Exception 1:");
			Console.WriteLine(x.StackTrace);
		}
		try {
			ThrowException2(); // line 25
		} catch (Exception x) {
			Console.WriteLine("Exception 2:");
			Console.WriteLine(x.StackTrace);
		}
	}

	private static void ThrowException1() {
		try {
			DivByZero(); // line 34
		} catch {
			throw; // line 36
		}
	}
	private static void ThrowException2() {
		try {
			DivByZero(); // line 41
		} catch (Exception ex) {
			throw ex; // line 43
		}
	}

	private static void DivByZero() {
		int x = 0;
		int y = 1 / x; // line 49
	}

and here is the output:

    Exception 1:
   at UnitTester.Program.DivByZero() in <snip>\Dev\UnitTester\Program.cs:line 49
   at UnitTester.Program.ThrowException1() in <snip>\Dev\UnitTester\Program.cs:line 36
   at UnitTester.Program.TestExceptions() in <snip>\Dev\UnitTester\Program.cs:line 19

Exception 2:
   at UnitTester.Program.ThrowException2() in <snip>\Dev\UnitTester\Program.cs:line 43
   at UnitTester.Program.TestExceptions() in <snip>\Dev\UnitTester\Program.cs:line 25

You can see that in Exception 1, the stack trace goes back to the DivByZero() method, whereas in Exception 2 it does not.

Take note, though, that the line number shown in ThrowException1() and ThrowException2() is the line number of the throw statement, not the line number of the call to DivByZero(), which probably makes sense now that I think about it a bit...

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The other answers are entirely correct, but this answer provides some extra detalis, I think.

Consider this example:

using System;

static class Program
{
  static void Main()
  {
    try
    {
      ThrowTest();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      Console.WriteLine("Your stack trace:");
      Console.WriteLine(e.StackTrace);
      Console.WriteLine();
      if (e.InnerException == null)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("No inner exception.");
      }
      else
      {
        Console.WriteLine("Stack trace of your inner exception:");
        Console.WriteLine(e.InnerException.StackTrace);
      }
    }
  }

  static void ThrowTest()
  {
    decimal a = 1m;
    decimal b = 0m;
    try
    {
      Mult(a, b);  // line 34
      Div(a, b);   // line 35
      Mult(b, a);  // line 36
      Div(b, a);   // line 37
    }
    catch (ArithmeticException arithExc)
    {
      Console.WriteLine("Handling a {0}.", arithExc.GetType().Name);

      //   uncomment EITHER
      //throw arithExc;
      //   OR
      //throw;
      //   OR
      //throw new Exception("We handled and wrapped your exception", arithExc);
    }
  }

  static void Mult(decimal x, decimal y)
  {
    decimal.Multiply(x, y);
  }
  static void Div(decimal x, decimal y)
  {
    decimal.Divide(x, y);
  }
}

If you uncomment the throw arithExc; line, your output is:

Handling a DivideByZeroException.
Your stack trace:
   at Program.ThrowTest() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 44
   at Program.Main() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 9

No inner exception.

Certainly, you have lost information about where that exception happened. If instead you use the throw; line, this is what you get:

Handling a DivideByZeroException.
Your stack trace:
   at System.Decimal.FCallDivide(Decimal& d1, Decimal& d2)
   at System.Decimal.Divide(Decimal d1, Decimal d2)
   at Program.Div(Decimal x, Decimal y) in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 58
   at Program.ThrowTest() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 46
   at Program.Main() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 9

No inner exception.

This is a lot better, because now you see that it was the Program.Div method that caused you problems. But it's still hard to see if this problem comes from line 35 or line 37 in the try block.

If you use the third alternative, wrapping in an outer exception, you lose no information:

Handling a DivideByZeroException.
Your stack trace:
   at Program.ThrowTest() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 48
   at Program.Main() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 9

Stack trace of your inner exception:
   at System.Decimal.FCallDivide(Decimal& d1, Decimal& d2)
   at System.Decimal.Divide(Decimal d1, Decimal d2)
   at Program.Div(Decimal x, Decimal y) in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 58
   at Program.ThrowTest() in c:\somepath\Program.cs:line 35

In particular you can see that it's line 35 that leads to the problem. However, this requires people to search the InnerException, and it feels somewhat indirect to use inner exceptions in simple cases.

In this blog post they preserve the line number (line of the try block) by calling (through reflection) the internal intance method InternalPreserveStackTrace() on the Exception object. But it's not nice to use reflection like that (the .NET Framework might change their internal members some day without warning).

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No, this will cause the exception to have a different stack trace. Only using a throw without any exception object in the catch handler will leave the stack trace unchanged.

You may want to return a boolean from HandleException whether the exception shall be rethrown or not.

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Also, In .NET 1.1 throw will also throw non .NET exceptions

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when you do throw ex, that exception thrown becomes the "original" one. so all previous stack trace will not be there.

if you do throw, the exception just goes down the line and you'll get the full stack trace.

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Look at here: http://blog-mstechnology.blogspot.de/2010/06/throw-vs-throw-ex.html

Throw:

   try{
        // do some operation that can fail
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
        // do some local cleanup
        throw;
   }

It preserve the Stack information with Exception

This is called as "Rethrow"

If want to throw new exception,

throw new ApplicationException("operation failed!");

Throw Ex:

try
   {
        // do some operation that can fail
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
        // do some local cleanup
        throw ex;
   }

It Won't Send Stack information with Exception

This is called as "Breaking the Stack"

If want to throw new exception,

throw new ApplicationException("operation failed!",ex);
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