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Currently I'm learning Obj-C for Mac developing, with Cocoa. I made a simple file browser with an inspector, to see a file's icon an some info. So far, so good. Now I made it document based, so I could have more than one open windows.

To tell the inspector which file it should inspect, I use the NSWindowDidBecomeMainNotification. Works fine for switching between windows, but it gives an EXC_BAD_ACCESS when I close all windows and then open a new one.

This is the method that handles the notification:

- (void)windowChanged: (NSNotification *)notification
{
    NSWindow *window = [notification object];
    BrowserWindow *doc = [[window windowController] document];

    if (currentDocument != doc) {

        [currentDocument.arrayController removeObserver: self
                                             forKeyPath: @"selectionIndex"];

        [icon setImage:nil];
        [size setStringValue:@"-"];
        [owner setStringValue:@"-"];
        [filename setStringValue:@"(none selected)"];

        [doc.arrayController addObserver: self
                              forKeyPath: @"selectionIndex"
                                 options: NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew 
                                 context: NULL];
        currentDocument = doc;
    }
}

The error occurs where it calls removeObserver:forkeyPath: on the currentDocument.arrayController. It kinda makes sense, it tries to remove the observer for something that doesn't exist anymore, 'cause the window is closed. But how to fix it? I just can't think of anything else..

Could someone point me in the right directions?

I appreciate the help! :)

--

It's getting weirder.. Just checked the example that was downloadable from the website of the book I've got, and they're using the same approach, but it works all fine. Can't find any differences, it's driving me crazy.

--

Solved! More details later.

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1  
Of which class is this a method? –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 4 '11 at 22:29
    
Did you retain currentDocument anywhere? (I'm guessing not.) –  Hot Licks Sep 4 '11 at 22:37
    
@Rudy Velthuis It's a method of the InspectorController. –  Guido Hendriks Sep 4 '11 at 22:39
    
@Daniel R Hicks: I did not retain it. I just placed a NSLog with a retainCount before the removeObserver, just before it goes wrong, it shows this: 2011-09-05 00:43:06.015 FileBrowser1[17664:707] Cannot remove an observer <InspectorController 0x10014b730> for the key path "selectionIndex" from <NSView 0x10049a1e0> because it is not registered as an observer. –  Guido Hendriks Sep 4 '11 at 22:45
    
The message above contains the NSLog, which is empty.. Not 0 or something, just nothing. Before it just showed numeric values. –  Guido Hendriks Sep 4 '11 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To tell the inspector which file it should inspect, I use the NSWindowDidBecomeMainNotification. Works fine for switching between windows, but it gives an EXC_BAD_ACCESS when I close all windows and then open a new one.

This is part of the problem right there. When the last window closes, no window will become main. So, you also need to handle the case where a window resigns main, as happens when it closes (and when another window becomes main).

Your inspector probably should both retain the document and switch documents after a delay, using a timer (whose fire date you postpone every time another did become/resign main notification comes in) or delayed perform (which you cancel and re-perform every time). When the timer/perform fires, find out what document, if any, is the active document, and update the inspector accordingly.

Also note that you can have no active document (no document window is the main window) even when there are documents open. The About panel and your Preferences panel are two good ways to achieve (and test) this.

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What's the difference between opening a new window while no others are open, in which case there's no currentWindow, and when you close the active window and another becomes active. In the last case, there also isn't an main window when the other is becoming main? –  Guido Hendriks Sep 5 '11 at 16:48
    
@GuidoH: Yes there is. The window that becomes active is the one that is becoming main—that's what “main window” means in Cocoa. –  Peter Hosey Sep 5 '11 at 19:41
    
My comment was a bit weird, but the old window - that I close - that one isn't there when the other one becomes 'main window'? –  Guido Hendriks Sep 5 '11 at 20:00
    
@GuidoH: When you close the window that is the main window, it resigns main window. If there are any other windows, one of them will become the main window (and you will see the appearance of its frame change to reflect this). If the window you closed was your last window (i.e., you have no other open windows), then no window becomes the main window. That's why you need to handle both resign-main-window and become-main-window. –  Peter Hosey Sep 5 '11 at 23:42
    
Thank you, Peter. Gonna look into that and gonna think about how to implement your solution. It makes sense to me. :) –  Guido Hendriks Sep 6 '11 at 5:33

Daniel is probably right: You probably don't retain currentDocument. Make currentDocument a property:

@property (retain) BrowserWindow *currentDocument;

And synthesize it in the implementation section:

@synthesize currentDocument;

And change your code to:

- (void) windowChanged: (NSNotification *) notification
{
    NSWindow *window = [notification object];
    BrowserWindow *doc = [[window windowController] document];

    if (self.currentDocument != doc) 
    {
        [self.currentDocument.arrayController removeObserver: self
                                                  forKeyPath: @"selectionIndex"];

        [icon setImage: nil];
        [size setStringValue: @"-"];
        [owner setStringValue: @"-"];
        [filename setStringValue: @"(none selected)"];

        [doc.arrayController addObserver: self
                              forKeyPath: @"selectionIndex"
                                 options: NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew 
                                 context: NULL];
        self.currentDocument = doc;
    }
}

You might want to do the same for icon, size, owner and filename.

And heed the warning of the message: you probably don't register self as observer to start with.

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It looks like something changed, but it's not working yet. Sometimes I get the EXC_BAD_ACCESS, other times the windows just open and hangs, with the titlebar like it's inactive. Still says: 2011-09-05 00:52:35.074 FileBrowser1[17849:707] Cannot remove an observer <InspectorController 0x10043ee30> for the key path "selectionIndex" from <NSWindow 0x100165080> because it is not registered as an observer.. Which actually makes sense to me.. When closing a window, doesn't that automatically get rid of the observer? Icon, size, owner and filename are IBOutlets, does they need it as well? –  Guido Hendriks Sep 4 '11 at 22:56
    
@GuidoH: No, an object being deallocated while something is still observing it will get you a different warning, saying basically what I just said. Something is trying to remove the observer, possibly you, but you haven't added it yet. –  Peter Hosey Sep 4 '11 at 23:05
    
arrayController certainly isn't a window, it's just an NSArrayController. The only place that the InspectorController is added as an Observer is in the code in my post. So the first time that it's registered is when the first window opens. –  Guido Hendriks Sep 4 '11 at 23:09
    
If they are IBOutlets, no need to retain. But the message seems to say that you are trying to remove an InspectroController as an observer from an NSWindow. Is arrayController a window? And where did you register your InspectorController as observer for the first time? –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 4 '11 at 23:11
    
@GuidoH: but the message says you are trying to remove an observer from an NSWindow, not from an NSArrayController. That is suspicious. –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 4 '11 at 23:13

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