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Quoting from this blogpost:

http://www.codesynthesis.com/~boris/blog/2008/10/13/writing-64-bit-safe-code/

This works because a valid memory index can only be in the [0, ~size_t(0)-1] range. The same approach, for example, is used in std::string.

So why is ~size_t(0) (this should usually equal 0xFFFFFFFF in 32-bit systems) not a valid array index? I assume that if you have 32 bits you should be able to reference the whole range [0, 0xFFFFFFFF], no?

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Beats me. I've never heard of that restriction. I know Windows reserves the upper half of addresses (high bit set to 1) for itself, but that's just a policy thing. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 4 '11 at 22:52
    
0xFFFFFFFF is an invalid array index but you forgot to mention in your analysis the fact that you then subtract 1 from that: which gives 0xFFFFFFFE –  C Johnson Sep 5 '11 at 4:17
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3 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

IMPORTANT NOTE: The term "memory index" is ambiguous and confusing. The linked article refers strictly to array indexes, not addresses in memory. It is entirely valid for size_t to be incapable of representing all memory addresses, which is why we have the intptr_t type in C99. Of course, this doesn't apply to your workstation, which undoubtedly has a simple Von Neumann type architecture. (The question has since been edited to remove references to "memory indexes".)

The C standard guarantees that size_t can hold the size of any array. However, for any array a[N], the standard guarantees that a + N must be a valid pointer and compare not equal to any pointer to an element of a.

Therefore, size_t must be able to represent at least one value larger than any possible array index. Since ~(size_t)0 is guaranteed to be the maximum size_t value, it is a good choice of sentinel for array indexes.

Discussion:

  1. Why is ~(size_t)0 guaranteed to be the maximum? Because the standard explicitly says so: from §6.5.3.3: "If the promoted type is an unsigned type, the expression ~E is equivalent to the maximum value representable in that type minus E." Note that (size_t)-1 is guaranteed to also be the maximum by the rules of conversion from signed to unsigned types. Unfortunately, it is not always easy to find the definition for SIZE_MAX on your platform, so (size_t)-1 and ~(size_t)0 are preferred.

  2. What is the size of an array indexed from 0 to ~0? Such an array cannot exist according to the C standard, by the argument outlined at the top of this post.

  3. If you malloc(-1), the resulting memory region would have to start at 0. (FALSE) There are a lot of really bizarre cases which the standard allows but one doesn't encounter in practice. For example, imagine a system where (uintptr_t)-1 > (size_t)-1. The C standard is worded in exactly the way it is because it doesn't just run on your PC, it runs on bizarre little DSPs with Harvard architectures, and it runs on archaic systems with byzantine memory segmenting schemes. There are also some systems of historical interest where NULL pointers do not have the same representation as 0.

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I'm amazed by the sheer mass of deleted answers that appeared below my post between when I started and finished composing my answer... –  Dietrich Epp Sep 4 '11 at 23:02
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+1 well put. Another way to say this: what would the size of an array indexed from 0...~0 be? –  Ray Toal Sep 4 '11 at 23:03
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I don't think this is correct. If a + N must be a valid pointer, what if a starts at exactly half the memory and you add three quarters? Also it doesn't make sense that size_t must be able to represent one value larger than any possible array index. Why is that? And there were three deleted answers. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '11 at 23:03
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Sure, size_t can hold the size of any array. But it doesn't follow that the maximum allowable array size must be size_t. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 4 '11 at 23:04
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@Mr. Roland: That is not how conversion works. For example, on most systems, (unsigned int)(short)-1 is 0xFFFFFFFF, not 0xFFFF. Using -1 is preferable because you won't get the wrong result if you forget the cast, or put the cast in the wrong order. For example, size_t x = -1; is equivalent to size_t x = SIZE_MAX;, but on 64-bit systems size_t x = ~0; is 0xFFFFFFFF not 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 5 '11 at 0:33
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Well, as @Apprentice Queue correctly noted in his answer, since the size of the largest continuous object in C or C++ program is limited by SIZE_MAX (same as (size_t) -1, same as ~size_t(0)) he maximum index one'll ever need to index the bytes of that object is SIZE_MAX - 1. Yet at the same time, as @Dietrich Epp correctly notes in his answer, C and C++ allow address arithmetic one element beyond the end of the array, which makes SIZE_MAX a valid index, if not for accessing the array elements, then at least for pointer arithmetic. So, formally speaking SIZE_MAX is a valid index, even though it can't stand for an existing element of an array.

However, the whole idea of using size_t as a type that allows one to "index entire memory" is only valid within the bounds of some specific platform, where size_t does indeed happen to be sufficient for memory indexing ("flat memory" platforms like Win32, Win64, Linux belong to this category). In reality, from the general point of view, type size_t is not sufficient for memory indexing. Type size_t is only guaranteed to be sufficient for indexing bytes in a single continuous object in C or C++ program. Neither C nor C++ guarantees to support continuous objects that cover the entire address space. In other words, type size_t is guaranteed to be sufficient to index any explicitly declared array object in C/C++ program, but it generally is not guaranteed to be sufficient for counting nodes in a linked list. Yet, under assumption that on some specific platform the range of size_t does cover the entire memory, the value of (size_t) -1 looks like a good choice of the "reserved" value, since this index can only stand for the last byte in the array of bytes covering the whole address space. Obviously, no one will ever need this index in practice for the actual indexing.

Nevertheless, if you are really interested in a formally appropriate type that can index the entire memory (and, consequently, is able to store the number of elements in any in-memory container), that would be uintptr_t, not size_t. The author of that blog post does seem to understand the general issue here, since he notes that size_t is not good for indexing files (i.e. for storing file sizes or offsets). However, it still would be nice to note that for pretty much the very same reasons type size_t is not appropriate for indexing memory as well. Type size_t is not really related to RAM or process address space, contrary to what the author claims in his blog entry. Type uintptr_t is related to process address space, but not size_t. The fact that size_t is sufficient on the platforms he mentions is nothing more than a specific property of those platforms.

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This is a far better answer. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '11 at 23:12
    
Thanks for this answer! I would mark this one as valid too but I can mark only one :( –  Roland Sep 5 '11 at 0:45
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The intuition is this:

x = malloc(~size_t(0));    // the most you can allocate
x[~size_t(0) -1];          // the highest valid index
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+1, this is the essence of the reason. ~0 is not a valid index because there are ~0 values. So ~0 is one byte past the bounds of memory. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '11 at 23:14
    
+1: This cuts the Gordian knot. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 4 '11 at 23:15
    
Ooh, actually, hang on. The C standard dictates that for an array of length N, &x[N] is valid. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 4 '11 at 23:27
    
@Oli Charlesworth: Yes, &x[N] is valid but you are not allowed to dereference that pointer. Note that x[N] is not valid. Consider &x[N] - &x[0] == N –  janm Sep 5 '11 at 1:14
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