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I have a table with columns and data as follows:

Table1
ID  Name    PID
A1  Apple   P1
B1  Book    A1
B2  Brook   A1
C1  Cat     B1
C2  Cook    B1
C3  Car     B1
D1  Dog     B2
D2  Doll    B2
E1  Egg     C1

I want the results as follows:

ID  Name                    Depth
B1  Apple\Book              2
C1  Apple\Book\Cat          3
E1  Apple\Book\Cat\Egg      4
C2  Apple\Book\Cook         3
C3  Apple\Book\Car          3
B2  Apple\Brook             2
D1  Apple\Brook\Dog         3
D2  Apple\Brook\Doll        3

The relationship is that a row is a child of another row if PID of that row is equal to ID of the parent row.

Apple is the base. So the first statement would be something like:

Select ID, Name, 2 from Table1 where PID=(select ID from Table1 where Name='Apple');

My current solution is creating a lot of views and save all those similar statements like that to views and union them together. But I don't want that. I want to finish that within 1 select statement.A

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't Apple's PID be NULL? Or is P1 your sentinel value? –  cdhowie Sep 5 '11 at 1:58
    
Actually Apple's also a child record of some other record.. but I only want to retrieve records under Apple.. Of coz.. the real base record's PID is null.. –  william Sep 5 '11 at 2:11
    
Understood. I've incorporated that requirement into my answer. –  cdhowie Sep 5 '11 at 2:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
declare @Table1 table
(
  ID varchar(2),
  Name varchar(10),
  PID varchar(2)
)

insert into @Table1 values  
('A1',  'Apple',   'P1'),
('B1',  'Book',    'A1'),
('B2',  'Brook',   'A1'),
('C1',  'Cat',     'B1'),
('C2',  'Cook',    'B1'),
('C3',  'Car',     'B1'),
('D1',  'Dog',     'B2'),
('D2',  'Doll',    'B2'),
('E1',  'Egg',     'C1')

;with C as
(
  select T.ID,
         cast(T.Name as varchar(max)) as Name,
         1 as Depth
  from @Table1 as T
  where T.Name = 'Apple'
  union all
  select T.ID,
         cast(C.Name+'\'+T.Name as varchar(max)),
         C.Depth + 1
  from @Table1 as T
    inner join C
      on T.PID = C.ID
)
select C.ID,
       C.Name,
       C.Depth
from C
where C.Depth > 1
order by C.Name

Edit With out the Apple.

;with C as
(
  select T.ID,
         cast(T.Name as varchar(max)) as Name,
         1 as Depth
  from @Table1 as T
    inner join @Table1 as TP
      on T.PID = TP.ID
  where TP.Name = 'Apple'
  union all
  select T.ID,
         cast(C.Name+'\'+T.Name as varchar(max)),
         C.Depth + 1
  from @Table1 as T
    inner join C
      on T.PID = C.ID
)
select C.ID,
       C.Name,
       C.Depth
from C
order by C.Name
share|improve this answer
    
I got the correct answer. Thanks.. just curious.. now the answer is 'Apple\Book','Apple\Brook' and so on.. Can I remove the 'Apple'? so, for 'Book' and 'Brook' just so.. for 'Cat' it will be like 'Book\Cat' not 'Apple\Book\Cat'... –  william Sep 5 '11 at 6:57
    
@william - Sure, just make the anchor part start one level down. –  Mikael Eriksson Sep 5 '11 at 7:09
    
Thanks a lot. Appreciate it !! :) –  william Sep 5 '11 at 7:20

I don't know if there's an elegant way to get the exact ordering you listed, but here is one approach with a recursive CTE:

;WITH cte AS
(
    SELECT ID, Name, Depth = 1
        FROM dbo.Table1 
        WHERE Name = 'Apple'
    UNION ALL
    SELECT t.ID, t.Name, Depth = cte.Depth + 1
        FROM cte 
        INNER JOIN dbo.Table1 AS t
        ON t.PID = cte.ID
)
SELECT ID, Name, Depth
FROM cte
WHERE Depth > 1;
share|improve this answer
    
sry.. i know that.. but i altered the question abt.. tkz for the answer anyway.. I need not simply the name.. sth like Apple\Book –  william Sep 5 '11 at 4:33
    
Why wouldn't you say what you wanted in the first place? It's a shame so many people wasted time solving the wrong problem... –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 5 '11 at 13:52
    
Yea.. I m so sorry.. there were so many things at that time.. I am deeply sorry.. –  william Sep 6 '11 at 1:34

Here is the query I came up with on PostgreSQL. I don't have SQL Server, so I can't test, but Google has led me to believe that this query structure will work on SQL Server as well.

SELECT t1.*, (
    WITH q AS (
        SELECT t2.*
        FROM Table1 AS t2
        WHERE t2.ID = t1.ID
           OR (t1.ID IS NULL AND t2.ID IS NULL)

        UNION ALL

        SELECT t3.*
        FROM Table1 AS t3
        JOIN q
        ON t3.ID = q.PID
        AND t3.ID <> 'P1'
        -- 'P1' on the above line is the "sentinel" value you want to
        -- stop traversing at.  Remove the AND clause altogether if you
        -- want to traverse up to the ultimate root record.
    )
    SELECT COUNT(q.ID)
    FROM q
) AS depth
FROM Table1 AS t1;

Here is an example run on PostgreSQL. Note that PostgreSQL requires WITH RECURSIVE when declaring a common table expression that references itself. This, and the sample data, are the only differences between the two queries:

$ WITH Table1(ID, Name, PID) AS (VALUES
$     ('A1', 'Apple', 'P1'),
$     ('B1', 'Book',  'A1'),
$     ('B2', 'Brook', 'A1'),
$     ('C1', 'Cat',   'B1'),
$     ('C2', 'Cook',  'B1'),
$     ('C3', 'Car',   'B1'),
$     ('D1', 'Dog',   'B2'),
$     ('D2', 'Doll',  'B2'),
$     ('E1', 'Egg',   'C1')
$ )
$ SELECT t1.*, (
$     WITH RECURSIVE q AS (
$         SELECT t2.*
$         FROM Table1 AS t2
$         WHERE t2.ID = t1.ID
$            OR (t1.ID IS NULL AND t2.ID IS NULL)
$
$         UNION ALL
$
$         SELECT t3.*
$         FROM Table1 AS t3
$         JOIN q
$         ON t3.ID = q.PID
$         AND t3.ID <> 'P1'
$     )
$     SELECT COUNT(q.ID)
$     FROM q
$ ) AS depth
$ FROM Table1 AS t1;
 id | name  | pid | depth
----+-------+-----+-------
 A1 | Apple | P1  |     1
 B1 | Book  | A1  |     2
 B2 | Brook | A1  |     2
 C1 | Cat   | B1  |     3
 C2 | Cook  | B1  |     3
 C3 | Car   | B1  |     3
 D1 | Dog   | B2  |     3
 D2 | Doll  | B2  |     3
 E1 | Egg   | C1  |     4
(9 rows)
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