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I have this function that I wrote that has a bunch of document.getelementbyid calls to a repeating pattern of ids (a,b,c,d,e,f) that is inside a for loop, which make them a1,b1,c1...a6,b6,c6... Is possible to assign a variable to document.getelementbyid without giving specific ids, ie var xyz = document.getelementbyid; I remember coming across a post that shows different ways of writing the dom calls.

Or the best that I can do in this case is var dom = document; ?

Basically, I have multiple rows of divs, and each div has a unique id.

Thanks.

Edit 2

I could not get Andrew's code to work, but I followed his idea and rewrote the code, it turned out to be simpler than I initially made it out to be. Last block of codes at bottom.

function display (namearr, current) {


var tldstr = document.getElementById("dlist").innerHTML;
tldstr = tldstr.slice(0, -1)
var tldarr = tldstr.split(",");

index = current - 1;    
var arrlen = tldarr.length;
var img = "<img src='../loader1.gif' alt='loading' width='40' />";

for (z=0; z<10; z++){


  i=z+1;
  if (index >= arrlen) {
        document.getElementById("a"+i).className = "tldn";
        document.getElementById("b"+i).className = "tldn";
        document.getElementById("c"+i).className = "tldn";
        document.getElementById("d"+i).className = "tldn";
        document.getElementById("e"+i).className = "tldn";
        document.getElementById("f"+i).className = "tldn";
  }

  else if ( tldarr[index] == "n" || tldarr[index].length != 6) 
        {

        document.getElementById("a"+i).innerHTML = img;
        document.getElementById("b"+i).innerHTML = img;
        document.getElementById("c"+i).innerHTML = img;
        document.getElementById("d"+i).innerHTML = img;
        document.getElementById("e"+i).innerHTML = img;
        document.getElementById("f"+i).innerHTML = img;


        }//close  first elseif
  else {
        tldstr = tldarr[index];

        document.getElementById("a"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(0);
        document.getElementById("b"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(1);
        document.getElementById("c"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(2);
        document.getElementById("d"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(3);
        document.getElementById("e"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(4);
        document.getElementById("f"+i).className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(5);

       }//close second elseif

    index++;
    }//close first for loop


}//end of  function

HTML markup

<div class="xyz">

    <div  class="tldn" id="a1">xxx</div>
    <div  class="tldn" id="b1">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="c1">xxx</div>
    <div  class="tldn" id="d1">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="e1">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="f1">xxx</div>
 </div>

  <div class="123">

    <div  class="tldn" id="a2">xxx</div>
    <div  class="tldn" id="b2">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="c2">xxx</div>
    <div  class="tldn" id="d2">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="e2">xxx</div>
    <div class="tldn" id="f2">xxx</div>
  </div>

Working code

function display (namearr, current) {
var aarr = [];
var barr = [];
var carr = [];
var darr = [];
var earr = [];
var farr = [];

for (var z=1; z<=10; z++) {
  c = z-1;
  aarr[c] = document.getElementById("a"+z);
  barr[c] = document.getElementById("b"+z);
  carr[c] = document.getElementById("c"+z);
  darr[c] = document.getElementById("d"+z);
  earr[c] = document.getElementById("e"+z);
  farr[c] = document.getElementById("f"+z);

 var tldstr = document.getElementById("dlist").innerHTML;
    tldstr = tldstr.slice(0, -1)
    var tldarr = tldstr.split(",");

    index = current - 1;    
    var arrlen = tldarr.length;
    var img = "<img src='../loader1.gif' alt='loading' width='40' />";

    for (i=0; i<10; i++){


      if (index >= arrlen) {
            aarr[i].className = "tldn";
            barr[i].className = "tldn";
            carr[i].className = "tldn";
                .
                .
                .

      }

      else if ( tldarr[index] == "n" || tldarr[index].length != 6) 
            {

            aarr[i].innerHTML = img;
            barr[i].innerHTML = img;
            .
                .
                .


            }//close  first elseif
      else {
            tldstr = tldarr[index];

            aarr[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(0);
            aarr[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(1);
            .
            .
                .
           }//close second elseif

        index++;
        }//close first for loop

}
share|improve this question
    
How are your aX, bX elements implemented in your HTML? –  Py. Sep 5 '11 at 6:29
    
@Py, they are divs, I implement them as a table of multiple rows and cols. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:36
    
You always have 10 'a'-divs, 10 'b'... or count of divs can be increased or decreased dinamically? –  Andrew D. Sep 5 '11 at 6:56
    
There are many way to do that Jamex, could you provide a markup sample? (say a 2*2 or 3*3 grid) –  Py. Sep 5 '11 at 7:37
    
@Andrew, yes, static 10x6 table –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 7:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If count of divs is constant during page exists, then next code can reduce calls of document.getElementsById and increase speed of display() function:

var divsObj={a:[],b:[],c:[],d:[],e:[],f:[]};
for (var i=1; i<=10; i++) {
  divsObj.a.push(document.getElementById("a"+i));
  divsObj.b.push(document.getElementById("b"+i));
  divsObj.c.push(document.getElementById("c"+i));
  divsObj.d.push(document.getElementById("d"+i));
  divsObj.e.push(document.getElementById("e"+i));
  divsObj.f.push(document.getElementById("f"+i));
}

function display (namearr, current) {
  var tldstr = document.getElementById("dlist").innerHTML;
  tldstr = tldstr.slice(0, -1)
  var tldarr = tldstr.split(",");

  //index = current - 1;
  var index = current - 1; // if *index* not global or closur variable use *var*
  var arrlen = tldarr.length;
  var img = "<img src='../loader1.gif' alt='loading' width='40' />";

  for (var i=0; i<10; i++) {
    if (index >= arrlen) {
      divsObj.a[i].className = "tldn";
      divsObj.b[i].className = "tldn";
      divsObj.c[i].className = "tldn";
      divsObj.d[i].className = "tldn";
      divsObj.e[i].className = "tldn";
      divsObj.f[i].className = "tldn";
    }
    else if ( tldarr[index] === "n" || tldarr[index].length !== 6) {
      divsObj.a[i].innerHTML = img;
      divsObj.b[i].innerHTML = img;
      divsObj.c[i].innerHTML = img;
      divsObj.d[i].innerHTML = img;
      divsObj.e[i].innerHTML = img;
      divsObj.f[i].innerHTML = img;
    }
    else {
      tldstr = tldarr[index];
      divsObj.a[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(0);
      divsObj.b[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(1);
      divsObj.c[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(2);
      divsObj.d[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(3);
      divsObj.e[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(4);
      divsObj.f[i].className = "tld"+tldstr.charAt(5);
    }
    index++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Andrew, this is really nice, I will check it out. Thanks again. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 9:54
    
Hi Andrew, your 2d array makes great sense. Is the syntax of the code correct? it errors out for me, I put an alert statements in front of the first divsObj and after the last divsObj in each "if", and the alert statements fail to execute if they are placed after the divsObj, this mean that function does not recognize divsObj as a defined variable (more specifically, my error escape code sees divsObj as an unknown function). Thanks. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 19:56
    
Hi Andrew, also in the display function, the "for" loop, shouldn't "var i" starts at 0 ? so that when the loop calls the first element of "a", the divsObj.a[0] contains the id "a1" –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 20:19
    
Yes, sorry, you're right. I made correction for second for loop. –  Andrew D. Sep 6 '11 at 5:19

No, you cannot assign a method to a variable. You could wrap it in a function though.

function setClassName(id, className) {
   document.getElementByID(id).className = className;
}

if (index >= arrlen) {
    setClassName("a"+i, "tldn");
    setClassName("b"+i, "tldn");
    //etc
}

Or even better create an array of your letters and then pass that in too

//pseudocode
var foo = array(a, b, c, d, e, f);

function ( foo, className ) {
   //iterate over array and apply class name
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, does this method reduce the dom call to reduce resources? –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:39
    
No it does not. If you want to store references to an element, just assign them to a variable. var x = document.getElementByID('x'); –  mrtsherman Sep 5 '11 at 6:43

This seems like a two-part question to me:

Reducing Traversal of the Scope Chain

One of the optimization strategies you reference is assigning to a local (function-scoped) variable. This is usually done to minimize the amount of the scope chain that needs to be traversed when accessing that variable. The book High Performance Javascript (PDF of relevant chapter) covers this nicely.

Along those lines, aliasing document to a function-level variable could result in some marginal gain in efficiency by shortening the scope chain. However, this is arguably a micro-optimization, and it won't handle the main potential slowdown you're mentioning, which is the repeated DOM calls in a loop.

Simplifying the DOM calls

For better code maintainability and efficiency, you should eliminate querying a large number of elements by ID in the way you're doing it (although getting an element by ID is very efficient, the repeated calls do add up and in this case arguably make the code less clear). A good way to do so relies on jQuery or another library with good selector support. Using a library (example below assumes jQuery) will reduce the amount of code you have to write, while handling cross-browser differences.

Think about what the elements you're referencing have in common and how to query them as one set. A good strategy is to assign class names (in the serverside code where you're currently setting the element IDs) to each of the elements making clear what set(s) each belongs to. class="cell type_a set_4" would set the classes for the element that currently has ID "a4".

Then, retrieve the full set of elements at once. Specifying a parent element will make things more efficient:

var elements = $('#id_of_parent_element .cell')

Once you've retrieved the elements, you can then filter the list down to the desired ones without having to make further calls to the DOM. Here's the final code for the loop (note that this is also a lot less verbose than getting all those separately by ID):

var elements = $('#id_of_parent_element .cell'); // get the "cell" elements

for (z=0; z<10; z++){

    var current_elements = elements.filter('.set_' + z); // filter to numbered set

    if (index >= arrlen) {
        current_elements.addClass('tldn');
    } else if ( tldarr[index] == "n" || tldarr[index].length != 6)  {
        current_elements.innerHTML = img;
    } else {
        var tldstr = tldarr[index];
        current_elements.each(function(index, element) {
            $(this).addClass("tld" + tldstr.charAt(index));
        });
    }
}

Note that the number and runtime of the calls to the DOM will vary depending on browser, because jQuery attempts to use native functions like document.getElementsByClassName where possible, while still supporting older versions that didn't have them. But the net result should be fewer DOM calls made, a marginal efficiency boost, and fewer lines of code to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example, I have thought about using classname and name, and will likely use name. I just don't want to rely on class names because getelementbyclassname is not supported by ie6, and name is the same in ie6, I tested them and they give inconsistent results from the intention that might cause some headaches with troubleshooting down the road when I have to revisit the codes without remembering the nuances. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 8:11

Do you want to make a shortcut to document.getElementById? If so you can do this

yourshortcut = function(id) { return document.getElementById(id); };
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this short cut is nice to reduce the length of the code, but it does not help increase dom access speed. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 7:15
    
Ok, couldn't understand if that was the problem or this. You should look at a javascript framework like jquery to do dom access/manipulation. –  Per Hornshøj-Schierbeck Sep 5 '11 at 9:03

If you use a module pattern and pass it window and document as parameters, then any good minifier will reduce document to a single letter. Consider also accepting undefined as a 3rd parameter that you don't pass in when invoking your function.

I highly recommend reading http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth

I like to use the Loose Augmentation format, with additional parameters:

var MODULE = (function (my, window, document, undefined) { 
    // add capabilities... 

    return my; 
}(MODULE || {}, window, document));

Notice how this guarantees that undefined is undefined - something that could be set by malicious code. This top top from Paul Irish's 10 things I learned from the jQuery source - also an excellent read.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will investigate your suggestion, now I know where to start. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:46

I don't recommend it, but I think you're looking to assign a function as a variable (i.e. a function pointer).

var getById = document.getElementById;

Then it's just:

getById("a"+i).className = "tldn";

I'd suggest using a library like prototype or jQuery instead to clean up your code. Then your code can be written much more concisely:

$("#a"+i).addClass("tldn");

Also, just as a note on style - why are you assigning individual id's anyway? It sounds like you should be putting the "tldn" class in your markup to refer to a group of elements (after all, this is the intended use of the 'class' attribute on an element). Then you can use document.getElementsByClassName("tldn") to refer to all your elements, rather than write out six lines of code to refer to a group of elements.

Note: getElementsByClassName doesn't work on older browsers, like IE8 and below.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks, I am trying to write codes to be compatible with ie6 too. I will likely learn jquery, but I am now is just a beginner who is just trying to find codes to built a site, and I am just using blunt tools/methods. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:43
    
I am not sure if I read your answer right, but what I want to do is to assign a new css class to the div if the div meets certain conditions. I don't want to name the divs as a class without being able to ID each div. –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:51
    
@The first part of your code, does it work the same to increase speed as assigning a variable to a known id? Ex: var xyz = document.getelementbyid("a"); xyz.innerHTML = "sdfas"; –  Jamex Sep 5 '11 at 6:57
    
This won't work, at least not in Chrome or Firefox - you will get an error because "getById" will be called in the window scope, whereas document.getElementById expects to be called in the document scope. –  Ben Sep 5 '11 at 16:55

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