Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write an algorithm that will perform N-Dimensional mixed partial derivatives. I have an idea of what I need to be able to achieve, but I cannot seem to come up with the correct loops/recursion that are required to realize the N-dimensional case.

Here is the pattern for the first 4 dimensions:

| 1D  wzyx  | 2D           | 3D           | 4D           |
----------------------------------------------------------
| dx (0001) | dx    (0001) | dx    (0001) | dx    (0001) |
|           | dy    (0010) | dy    (0010) | dy    (0010) |
|           | dyx   (0011) | dyx   (0011) | dyx   (0011) |
|           |              | dz    (0100) | dz    (0100) |
|           |              | dzx   (0101) | dzx   (0101) |
|           |              | dzy   (0110) | dzy   (0110) |
|           |              | dzyx  (0111) | dzyx  (0111) |
|           |              |              | dw    (1000) |
|           |              |              | dwx   (1001) |
|           |              |              | dwy   (1010) |
|           |              |              | dwyx  (1011) |
|           |              |              | dwz   (1100) |
|           |              |              | dwzx  (1101) |
|           |              |              | dwzy  (1110) |
|           |              |              | dxyzw (1111) |

The number of derivatives for each dimension (because it follows a binary pattern) is (2^dim)-1; e.g., 2^3 = 8 - 1 = 7.

The derivative that is dyx is the dx value of the adjacent points in the y dimension. That holds true for all of the mixed partials. So that dzyx is dyx of the adjacent points in the z dimension. I'm not sure if this paragraph is relevant information for the question, just thought I'd put here for completeness.

Any help pointers suggestions are welcome. The part in bold is the part I need to realize.

::EDIT::

I'm going to to try and be a bit more explicit by providing an example of what I need. This is only a 2D case but it kind of exemplifies the whole process I think.

I need help coming up with the algorithm that will generate the values in columns dx, dy, dyx, et. al.

|  X  |  Y  | f(x, y) |  dx             |  dy       | dyx               |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0  |  0  |    4    |  (3-4)/2 = -0.5 |  (3-4)/2  | (-0.5 - (-2.0))/2 |
|  1  |  0  |    3    |  (0-4)/2 = -2.0 |  (2-3)/2  | (-2.0 - (-2.0))/2 |
|  2  |  0  |    0    |  (0-3)/2 = -1.5 | (-1-0)/2  | (-1.5 - (-1.5))/2 |
|  0  |  1  |    3    |  (2-3)/2 = -0.5 |  (0-4)/2  | (-0.5 - (-0.5))/2 |
|  1  |  1  |    2    | (-1-3)/2 = -2.0 | (-1-3)/2  | (-1.5 - (-2.0))/2 |
|  2  |  1  |   -1    | (-1-2)/2 = -1.5 | (-4-0)/2  | (-1.5 - (-1.5))/2 |
|  0  |  2  |    0    | (-1-0)/2 = -0.5 |  (0-3)/2  | (-0.5 - (-0.5))/2 |
|  1  |  2  |   -1    | (-4-0)/2 = -2.0 | (-1-2)/2  | (-2.0 - (-2.0))/2 |
|  2  |  2  |   -4    |(-4--1)/2 = -1.5 |(-4--1)/2  | (-1.5 - (-1.5))/2 |

f(x, y) is unknown, only its values are known; so analytic differentiation is of no use, it must be numeric only.

Any help pointers suggestions are welcome. The part in bold is the part I need to realize.

::EDIT - AGAIN::

Started a Gist here: https://gist.github.com/1195522

share|improve this question
4  
Are you asking how to generate the list of (0101 ...)? –  Owen Sep 5 '11 at 6:30
    
i think this question is suitable for codegolf.stackexchange.com –  amod0017 Sep 5 '11 at 6:35
1  
@Ryan, well, if you take your bitstring and make a vector e, then find |f(x + e) - f(x)| / |e| that's the partial in that direction -- is that what you're looking for? –  Owen Sep 5 '11 at 6:53
2  
I envy you getting to work on fun problems like this one. –  Lance Roberts Sep 5 '11 at 7:32
4  
@amod0017 If it's not in the form of a winnable contest, it's not really suitable for codegolf.se –  Gareth Sep 5 '11 at 8:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understood you correctly, I think the following can work:

function partial_dev(point, dimension):
    neighbor_selector = top_bit(dimension)
    value_selector = dimension XOR neighbor_selector
    prev_point = point_before(point,neighbor_selector)
    next_point = pointafter(point,neighbor_selector)
    if value_selector == 0:
        return (f[prev_point] - f[next_point])/2
    else:
        return ( partial_dev(prev_point, value_selector) -
                 partial_dev(next_point, value_selector) )/2

The idea is: your top bit of the dimension value is the coordinate in which the before and after points are selected. If the rest of the dimension value is 0, you use the f values for the point for partial derivative calculation. If it is not, you get the partial derivative represented by the rest of the bits to calculate the values.

If you need all the values of all the dimension values calculated, then you don't need recursion at all: just use the dimension selector as an array index, where each array element contains the full value set for that dimension. The array is initialized such that vals[0][coords] = f(coords). Then you calculate vals[1], vals[2], and when calculating vals[3], you use vals[1] as the value table instead of vals[0] (because 3 = 0b11, where neighbor selector is 0b10 and value_selector is 0b01).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm working on actually implementing this right now. But I have marked it as the answer now. I'll update the gist linked to in the question with the actual implemented code. –  Ryan Sep 6 '11 at 19:40

This problem is cleanly solved by functional programming. Indeed, \partial_{xy}f is the partial derivative along x of \partial_y f.

I suppose you have a black box function (or function object) f, taking its values as a pointer to a memory buffer. Its signature is assumed to be

double f(double* x);

Now, here is a code to get the (second order finite difference) partial derivative to f:

template <typename F>
struct partial_derivative
{
    partial_derivative(F f, size_t i) : f(f), index(i) {}

    double operator()(double* x)
    {
        // Please read a book on numerical analysis to tweak this one
        static const double eps = 1e-4;

        double old_xi = x[index];
        x[index] = old_xi + eps;
        double f_plus = f(x);

        // circumvent the fact that a + b - b != a in floating point arithmetic
        volatile actual_eps = x[index];
        x[index] = old_xi - eps;
        actual_2eps -= x[index]
        double f_minus = f(x);

        return (f_plus - f_minus) / actual_2eps;
    }

private:
    F f;
    size_t index;
};

template <typename F>
partial_derivative<F> partial(F f, index i)
{
    return partial_derivative<F>(f, i);
}

Now, to compute \partial_{123}f, you do:

boost::function<double(double*)> f_123 = partial(partial(partial(f, 0), 1), 2);

If you need to compute them all:

template <typename F>
boost::function<double(double*)> mixed_derivatives(F f, size_t* i, size_t n_indices)
{
    if (n_indices == 0) return f;
    else return partial(mixed_derivatives(f, i + 1, n_indices - 1), i[0]);
}

and so you can do:

size_t indices[] = { 0, 1, 2 };
boost::function<double(double*)> df_123 
    = mixed_derivatives(f, indices, sizeof(indices) / sizeof(size_t));
share|improve this answer
    
I have up-voted this answer, because I think it works. I don't really understand boost::function though, therefore I'm not really sure how I could make this work for an unknown number of dimensions. Also, I do not know the function so the assumption of double f(double* x) is invalid. All I have is an array of points that represent the output from a function. –  Ryan Sep 6 '11 at 14:15

It sure seems like you could just have a loop based on the dimension (number of binary places), and then recurse down to the next binary digit.

Rough (not C++) Pseudocode:

Function partialcalc(leadingdigit, dimension)

  If dimension > 1 {
    For i = 1 to dimension {
      //do stuff with these two calls
      partialcalc(0, i - 1)
      partialcalc(1, i - 1)
    }
  }
  Else {
    //partialcalc = 1D case
  }

return partialcalc

End Function

The way recursion works is that you have a problem, where it can be broken down into subproblems that are equivalent to the larger problem, just smaller. So since you're using all the binary digits to the dimensioneth place, then you just do the calculation on the top dimension by recursing to two subproblems based on the 0 and 1 value in the dimension digit. The bottom of the recursion is the dimension = 1 level. Since you emphasize that you only need to figure out how to structure the loop recursion, and already have the math figured out, this structure should work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
If someone wants to whip this into C++ shape, go for it. It's been too long for me. –  Lance Roberts Sep 5 '11 at 7:42
    
Lance I'm sorry I don't see what leadingdigit does in this code? Also, how does it know where to get the data from and where to put the data once the calculations are completed? –  Ryan Sep 5 '11 at 16:05
    
@Ryan, leadingdigit is the first (leftmost) binary digit for the dimension level, so it solves for all 0 digits first, recursing down, then it solves for all 1 digits, recursing down. The stuff is where you do the stuff you've already figured out on how to generate the data. While in VBA I would use redefining arrays to store the data, I imagine in C++ you'd use some type of pointer structure. –  Lance Roberts Sep 5 '11 at 18:30

Well, to make a start with the answers, my first thought would be to interpolate with Chebyshev Polynomials. The approximation can then easily be differentiated (or integrated).

The Gnu Scientific Library has an implementation.

Note, I am not an expert on Numerical Methods, and so I can't explain the problems with this method. However, it should work well enough if you want a local approximation. If someone knows better, feel free to downvote.

share|improve this answer
    
I use Chebyshev polynomials in my physics research, and this seems like a nice suggestion to me. –  Kipton Barros Sep 5 '11 at 15:42
    
I am sure Chebyshev polynomials are great at performing derivatives. But that does not really address the issue of being able to compute N-dimensional derivatives. The derivative is not the concern. –  Ryan Sep 5 '11 at 18:18
    
Chebyshev polynomials are for 1D functions. Also "it should work well enough if you want a local approximation" misses the point: Chebyshev approximation is useful when you want a global approximation. –  Alexandre C. Sep 5 '11 at 19:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.