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I have structure like this:

struct Rz3DContourNode {
  float x;
  float y;
  float z;
  float nx;
  float ny;
  float nz;
};

And I store elements in a STL vector as follows :

 std::vector < Rz3DContourNode >  nodes;

Now I want to change the nx,ny compoent of the nodes in the vector.I tried as follows:

*(&nodes[i].nx)=newNXValue;
*(&nodes[i].ny)=newNYValue;
*(&nodes[i].nz)=newNZValue;

This did not work.Is it because nodes[i] returns a copy of the object?

Is there any solution for this expect using pointers ?

I cannot use pointer (Rz3DContourNode*) , because I am using this vector in OpenGL as

glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT,sizeof(Rz3DContourNode), &nodes[0].nx);

EDIT - I am sorry.I actually keep a QList and get the std::vector everytime.That was the reason

std::vector<Rz3DContourNode> nodeVector = nodes.toVector().toStdVector();
share|improve this question
5  
nodes[i] does not return a copy of the object, can you post some failing code? *(&nodes[i].nx)=newNXValue; could/should be simplified to nodes[i].nx = newNXValue;. – Charles Bailey Sep 5 '11 at 8:39
    
thanks, i was getting copy of the vector everytime.that was the reason. – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Sep 5 '11 at 8:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It works on my compiler.... Taking the address of the instance and then dereferencing it is the same as not doing it all. So you don't need it. So replace this

*(&nodes[i].nx)=newNXValue;

with

nodes[i].nx = newNXValue;

Here is the code sample I tried:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

struct Rz3DContourNode {
  float x;
  float y;
  float z;
  float nx;
  float ny;
  float nz;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector < Rz3DContourNode >  nodes;
    float newNXValue = 4545.4f;
    float newNYValue = 453.0f;
    float newNZValue = 34.0f;

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        Rz3DContourNode node = {1.0f,1.0f,1.0f,1.0f,1.0f,1.0f};
        nodes.push_back(node);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < nodes.size(); i++)
    {
        nodes[i].nx = newNXValue;
        nodes[i].ny = newNYValue;
        nodes[i].nz = newNZValue;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry,i was doing something terribly wrong.I was getting a copy of the vector each time .(from QList ) – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Sep 5 '11 at 8:54
1  
Sometimes when you been at it all day, you just can't see through your own problems until you ask someone for help. Then the answer suddenly becomes clear as you verbalize the problem to someone else. If you like the answer than, vote it up. – C Johnson Sep 5 '11 at 8:56
    
sure,up voted! thanks – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Sep 5 '11 at 9:07
    
@C Johnson - i noticed that you work for autodesk! thats super cool !!! – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Sep 5 '11 at 9:38

Why bother with pointers? The [] operator returns references to stored objects, so you can just do

nodes[i].nx = newNXValue;
nodes[i].ny = newNYValue;
nodes[i].nz = newNZValue;
share|improve this answer

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