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Is there some standard way in Scala of specifying a function that does nothing, for example when implementing a trait? This works:

trait Doer {
  def doit
}

val nothingDoer = new Doer {
  def doit = { }
}

But perhaps there is some more congenial way of formulating nothingDoer?

Edit Some interesting answers have appeared, and I add a little to the question in response. First, it turns out that I could have used a default implementation in Doer. Good tip, but you don't always want that. Second, apparently a more idiomatic way of writing is:

val nothingDoer = new Doer {
  def doit { }
}

Third, although nobody suggested exactly that, I found that this also seems to work:

val nothingDoer = new Doer {
  def doit = Unit
}

Is this a good alternative?

(The ":Unit" that a few people suggested does not really add anything, I think.)

share|improve this question
    
that is more like defining a trait, rather than implementing it –  Nick A Miller Sep 5 '11 at 11:25
    
Well, it's both, isn't it. –  njlarsson Sep 5 '11 at 11:35
1  
In response to your edit, I don't think def doit = Unit has any meaning. Unit is the singleton object of the Unit type. You might as well say def doit = 42 or def doit = ListBuffer, because they work too. –  Luigi Plinge Sep 5 '11 at 13:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Since your return type is Unit, it's conventional not to use the =

val nothingDoer = new Doer {
  def doit {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Really? That wasn't my impression… –  njlarsson Sep 5 '11 at 11:37
    
@njlarsson: Yes, Luigi is correct. –  Alexey Romanov Sep 5 '11 at 11:40
3  
@njlarsson Ya rly. See codecommit.com/scala-style-guide.pdf section on method declarations –  Luigi Plinge Sep 5 '11 at 11:44
1  
It's also a particularly un-conventional use case. That "convention" is heavily based on the quite reasonable assumption that your method will actually contain some code, and is particularly ill-suited for this use case. Besides which, the style guide only offers guidelines, not rigid dogma - you really want to be making the Unit return type much more explicit here, it far better self-documents the fact that you're doing something unusual and a bit silly. –  Kevin Wright Sep 5 '11 at 18:35

If you often have "do nothing" objects, you can also have "do nothing" as the default implementation:

trait Doer {
  def doit {}
}

val nothingDoer = new Doer
share|improve this answer

Basicly you want something like:

trait Doer {
    def doit : Unit
}

You might consider looking at the type Option also.

share|improve this answer

I don't know a more idiomatic way of doing this (I don't think there is a equivalent of Python 'pass' i.e.).

But you can use "Unit" to specify that a method return nothing in a Trait:

def doit: Unit
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this is the default, it makes no difference. –  Alexey Romanov Sep 5 '11 at 11:40
2  
It make one in term of readability (and can be very important on classes), imho. –  Alois Cochard Sep 5 '11 at 11:55
1  
+1, I too prefer to be explicit about it. –  missingfaktor Sep 5 '11 at 13:10

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