Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sometimes I need to read log files that have ^M (control-M) in the line endings. I can do a global replace to get rid of them, but then something more is logged to the log file and, of course, they all come back.

Setting unix-style or dos-style end-of-line encoding doesn't seem to make much difference (but unix-style is my default). I'm using the undecided-(unix|dos) coding system.

I'm on windows, reading log files created by log4net (although log4net obviously isn't the only source of this annoyance).

Any hints?

share|improve this question
1  
Unfortunately, set-buffer-file-encoding-system doesn't do it. The buffer opens with the mode line saying UNIX. Giving it C-x RET f UNIX RET just ends up marking the buffer as modified without hiding the pesky ^M's. –  Russell Apr 8 '09 at 17:00
    
Emails in GNUS are another place you can encounter buffers with mixed end-of-line encoding. For instance if one is sending from a Windows-centric institution, perhaps Outlook. The header info is getting the Unix EOL encoding. –  Brady Trainor Sep 19 at 17:31

10 Answers 10

I believe you can change the line coding system the file is using to the Unix format with

C-x RET f UNIX RET

If you do that, the mode line should change to add the word "(Unix)", and all those ^M's should go away.

share|improve this answer
    
Not helpful, I think. set-buffer-file-coding-system seems to change the actual contents of the edited file. –  hillu Apr 8 '09 at 16:37

If you'd like to view the log files and simply hide the ^M's rather than actually replace them you can use Drew Adam's highlight extension to do so.

You can either write elisp code or make a keyboard macro to do the following

select the whole buffer
hlt-highlight-regexp-region
C-q C-M
hlt-hide-default-face

This will first highlight the ^M's and then hide them. If you want them back use `hlt-show-default-face'

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the plug, Justin. I added another (different) solution, below. More than one way to skin a cat... –  Drew Jan 1 '12 at 8:42

What about?

C-x RET c dos RET C-x C-f FILENAME RET

I made a file that has two lines, with the second having a carriage return. Emacs would open the file in Unix coding, and switching coding system does nothing. However, the universal-coding-system-argument above works.

share|improve this answer

Modern versions of emacs know how to handle both UNIX and DOS line endings, so when ^M shows up in the file, it means that there's a mixture of both in the file. When there is such a mixture, emacs defaults to UNIX mode, so the ^Ms are visible. The real fix is to fix the program creating the file so that it uses consistent line-endings.

share|improve this answer
    
Emacs is wrong. The real fix is to fix Emacs. E.g. git creates conflict files that don't have ^M s in the 'control' lines (e.g. lines beginning with <<<<<<). It is perfectly valid for git to ignore whatever line ending the file has, as the control lines are 'meta'. –  EoghanM Dec 3 '13 at 16:08
(defun remove-dos-eol ()
  "Do not show ^M in files containing mixed UNIX and DOS line endings."
  (interactive)
  (setq buffer-display-table (make-display-table))
  (aset buffer-display-table ?\^M []))

Solution by Johan Bockgård. I found it here.

share|improve this answer
    
it works charmingly. Why don't TS accept this answer? thanks –  swdev Apr 22 '11 at 13:08
2  
If you want this function to be run almost always add the following to your .emacs (took me some time to find out): (add-hook 'text-mode-hook 'remove-dos-eol) –  Henrik Jun 26 '12 at 20:59
    
YEARS I've been suffering the ^M. Thank you. –  EoghanM Dec 3 '13 at 16:05
    
@Henrik I realize that your comment is two years old, but I am unable to get my .emacs file to automatically call this function. Is there another mode that I might be in other than text-mode? –  Russell Apr 30 at 13:34
    
@Russell, does C-h m (describe-mode) help? –  Brady Trainor Sep 19 at 16:58

what about using dos2unix, unix2dos (now tofrodos)?

share|improve this answer

You can change the display-table entry of the Control-M (^M) character, to make it displayable as whitespace or even disappear totally (vacuous). See the code in library pp-c-l.el (Pretty Control-L) for inspiration. It displays ^L chars in an arbitrary way.

Edited: Oops, I just noticed that @binOr already mentioned this method.

share|improve this answer

Edric's answer should get more attention. Johan Bockgård's solution does address the poster's complaint, insofar as it makes the ^M's invisible, but that just masks the underlying problem, and encourages further mixing of Unix and DOS line-endings.

The proper solution would be to do a global M-x replace-regexp to turn all line endings to DOS ones (or Unix, as the case may be). Then close and reopen the file (not sure if M-x revert-buffer would be enough) and the ^M's will either all be invisible, or all be gone.

share|improve this answer
3  
M-x replace-string C-q C-m RET (from lists.netisland.net/archives/plug/plug-1999-06/msg00365.html) –  Robert Calhoun Nov 5 '12 at 2:51

Put this in your .emacs:

(defun dos2unix ()
  "Replace DOS eolns CR LF with Unix eolns CR"
  (interactive)
    (goto-char (point-min))
      (while (search-forward "\r" nil t) (replace-match "")))

Now you can simply call dos2unix and remove all the ^M characters.

share|improve this answer

If you encounter ^Ms in received mail in Gnus, you can use W c (wash CRs), or

(setq gnus-treat-strip-cr t)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.