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When you just want to do a try/except without handling the exception, how do you do it in Python?

Is the following the right way to do it?

try :
    shutil.rmtree ( path )
except :
    pass
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13  
When you just want to do a try catch without handling the exception, how do you do it in Python? –  Joan Venge Apr 8 '09 at 16:45
    
well you had the code from the very beginning! did it produce an error? or you don't understand what it's doing? –  SilentGhost Apr 8 '09 at 16:47
6  
Well it seemed to work, but I wanted to make sure if this was the actual practice to do this. –  Joan Venge Apr 8 '09 at 16:47
    
Also by practice I meant in Python sense. –  Joan Venge Apr 8 '09 at 17:41
4  
I think the question is worthwhile, even if it could be rephrased a bit. The distinction vartec showed in his answer is important. –  Gilad Naor May 14 '09 at 6:54
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8 Answers

up vote 237 down vote accepted
try:
  doSomething()
except: 
  pass

or

try:
  doSomething()
except Exception: 
  pass

The difference is, that the first one will also catch KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit and stuff like that, which are derived directly from exceptions.BaseException, not exceptions.Exception.
See documentation for details:

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1  
Note that StopIteration and Warning both inherit from Exception as well. Depending on your needs, you may want to inherit from StandardError instead. –  Ben Blank Apr 8 '09 at 17:01
1  
@Ben: both of these are "normal" exceptions, so no problem there.. –  vartec Apr 8 '09 at 17:03
    
This is true, but if you're not careful, you can run into subtle bugs (especially if you're doing something other than passing on StopIteration). –  Jason Baker Apr 8 '09 at 17:46
4  
-1, try: shuti.rmtree(...) except: pass will crudely suppress any errors (even if you misspell shutil resulting in a NameError) - at the very least do except OSError: –  dbr Jul 23 '12 at 13:59
1  
Is it possible to ignore the exceptions when they occur, while still printing them? –  Anderson Green Jul 23 '13 at 21:31
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When you just want to do a try catch without handling the exception, how do you do it in Python?

It depends on what you mean by "handling."

If you mean to catch it without taking any action, the code you posted will work.

If you mean that you want to take action on an exception without stopping the exception from going up the stack, then you want something like this:

try:
    do_something()
except:
    handle_exception()
    raise  #re-raise the exact same exception that was thrown
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3  
+1 nice addition to the thread of answers –  Jarret Hardie Apr 8 '09 at 17:13
    
perfect answer +1 –  Gaurav Jain Jul 25 '13 at 13:54
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It's generally considered best-practice to only catch the errors you are interested in, in the case of shutil.rmtree it's probably OSError:

>>> shutil.rmtree("/fake/dir")
Traceback (most recent call last):
    [...]
OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: '/fake/dir'

If you want to silently ignore that error, you would do..

try:
    shutil.rmtree(path)
except OSError:
    pass

Why? Say you (somehow) accidently pass the function an integer instead of a string, like..

shutil.rmtree(2)

It will give the error "TypeError: coercing to Unicode: need string or buffer, int found" - you probably don't want to ignore that, which can be difficult to debug..

If you defiantly want to ignore all errors, catch Exception rather than a bare catch: statement. Again, why?

It catches every exception, include the SystemExit exception which sys.exit() uses, for example:

>>> try:
...     sys.exit(1)
... except:
...     pass
... 
>>>

..compared to the following, which correctly exits:

>>> try:
...     sys.exit(1)
... except Exception:
...     pass
... 
shell:~$ 

If you want to write ever better behaved code, the OSError exception can represent various errors, but in the example above we only want to ignore Errno 2, so we could be even more specific:

try:
    shutil.rmtree(path)
except OSError, e:
    if e.errno == 2:
        # suppress "No such file or directory" error
        pass
    else:
        # reraise the exception, as it's an unexpected error
        raise

You could also import errno and change the if to if e.errno == errno.ENOENT:

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7  
This is the only answer to mention the most important point: silently trashing all exceptions is almost always a terrible idea. –  Carl Meyer Apr 10 '09 at 13:57
    
@Carl Meyer: but is it a worse idea than putting sys.exit in library code like I saw in many python modules ? I would prefer to catch say OSError when some file reading fails, but if the library exit, there is not much choice. I'm currently thinking of docutils because I'm working with it, but there are many others. –  kriss Feb 11 '11 at 1:35
    
@kriss Library code calling sys.exit() is awful. I don't know if it's worse than catching all exceptions: the point is, libraries should never do either. Libraries should catch and handle the specific exceptions they know how to handle, and let anything else bubble up to the calling code. –  Carl Meyer Feb 11 '11 at 16:37
    
@kriss Both equally bad in different ways - one makes a library difficult to use, the other makes it difficult to debug. try: stupidmodule.blah() except BaseException, e: if isinstance(e, SystemExit): ... –  dbr Feb 12 '11 at 10:52
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For completeness:

>>> def divide(x, y):
...     try:
...         result = x / y
...     except ZeroDivisionError:
...         print "division by zero!"
...     else:
...         print "result is", result
...     finally:
...         print "executing finally clause"

...from the python tutorial.

Also note that you can capture the exception like this:

>>> try:
...     this_fails()
... except ZeroDivisionError as detail:
...     print 'Handling run-time error:', detail
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First I quote the answer of Jack o'Connor from this thread. The referenced thread got closed so I write here:

"There's a new way to do this coming in Python 3.4:

from contextlib import ignored

with ignored(Exception):
    # your code

Here's the commit that added it: http://hg.python.org/cpython/rev/406b47c64480

And here's the author, Raymond Hettinger, talking about this and all sorts of other Python hotness (relevant bit at 43:30): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSGv2VnC0go "

My addition to this is the Python 2.7 equivalent:

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def ignored(*exceptions):
    try:
        yield
    except exceptions:
        pass

Then you use it like in Python 3.4:

with ignored(Exception):
    # your code
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@When you just want to do a try catch without handling the exception, how do you do it in Python?

This will help you to print what exception is:( i.e. try catch without handling the exception and print the exception.)

import sys
....
try:
    doSomething()
except:
    print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]

...

reg, Tilokchan

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2  
A more conventional way to do this is except Exception, e: then you can do print e.message etc –  dbr Jul 23 '12 at 22:05
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try:
      doSomething()
except Exception: 
    pass
else:
      stuffDoneIf()
      TryClauseSucceeds()

FYI the else clause can go after all exceptions and will only be run if the code in the try doesn't cause an exception.

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in python, we handle exceptions similar to other language but the difference is some syntex difference, for example-

try:
    #Your Code in which exception can occur
except <here we can put particular exception name>:
    #we can call that exception here also, like ZeroDivisionError()
    #now your code 
#we can put finally block also
finally:
    #YOur Code..
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