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Why does isset() not work when the property names are in variables?

$Object = new stdClass();
$Object->tst = array('one' => 1, 'two' => 2);

$tst = 'tst'; $one = 'one';
var_dump( $Object, isset( $Object->tst['one'] ), isset( $Object->$tst[ $one ] ) );

outputs the following:

object(stdClass)#39 (1) {
  ["tst"]=>
  array(2) {
    ["one"]=>
    int(1)
    ["two"]=>
    int(2)
  }
}
bool(true)
bool(false) // was expecting true here..

Edit: went on toying around with the code, and found out that

var_dump( $Object->$tst['one'] );

outputs a Notice:

E_NOTICE: Undefined property: stdClass::$t

So I think the problem is that the $tst[...] part is evaluated in 'string mode' (evaluating to the first character in the string; in this case "t"), before going onto fetching the property from the object;

var_dump( $tst, $tst['one'] ); // string(3) "tst" string(1) "t"

Solution: is to put braces around the variable name ($this->{$tst}), to tell the interpreter to retrieve its value first, and then evaluate the [...] part:

var_dump( $Object->{$tst}['one'] ); // int(1) yay!
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2  
Y u doing such cruel things to poor isset()? What's it ever done to you? (Seriously though, good question, I'm baffled!) –  Pekka 웃 Sep 5 '11 at 11:54
    
What does var_dump($Object->$tst) display? –  CodeCaster Sep 5 '11 at 11:54
3  
The issue is just operator precedence here. [] over -> due to variable as attribute name. –  mario Sep 5 '11 at 11:55
    
@mario ahh, makes sense! –  Pekka 웃 Sep 5 '11 at 11:57
    
I think the property $Object->$tst['one'] does not exist. Try to echo it. –  Karolis Sep 5 '11 at 11:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try adding braces around the property name...

isset( $Object->{$tst}[ $one ] );

CodePad.

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It works! You are a hero. Care to explain what exactly is happening here? :) –  Rijk Sep 5 '11 at 11:59
    
@Rijk Just figuring it out myself. My hunch is operator precedence, though PHP doesn't define the precedence for -> (though it does define the array subscript [ operator). –  alex Sep 5 '11 at 12:01
    
var_dump( $Object->$tst['one'] ); outputs E_NOTICE: Undefined property: stdClass::$t.. Maybe the $tst[...] part is being evaluated 'as string' first? –  Rijk Sep 5 '11 at 12:09

Answered my own question :)

Went on toying around with the code, and found out that

var_dump( $Object->$tst['one'] );

outputs a Notice:

E_NOTICE: Undefined property: stdClass::$t

So I think the problem is that the $tst[...] part is evaluated in 'string mode' (evaluating to the first character in the string; in this case "t"), before going onto fetching the property from the object;

var_dump( $tst, $tst['one'] ); // string(3) "tst" string(1) "t"

The solution is to put braces around the variable name ($this->{$tst}), to tell the interpreter to retrieve its value first, and then evaluate the [...] part.

var_dump( $Object->{$tst}['one'] );

I'm going to accept alex's answer, as it pointed me in the right direction. Thanks everyone!

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