Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a few custom logfunctions that are extensions of cat. A basic example is something like this:

catt<-function(..., file = "", sep = " ", fill = FALSE, labels = NULL,
    append = FALSE)
{
    cat(..., format(Sys.time(), "(%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S)"), "\n", file = file, 
        sep = sep, fill = fill, labels = labels, append = append)
}

Now, I work a lot with (selfmade) functions, and use some of these logfuntions to see the progress, which works quite well. What I notice, though, is that I almost always use these functions like this:

somefunc<-function(blabla)
{
  catt("somefunc: start")
  #do some very useful stuff here
  catt("somefunc: some time later")
  #even more useful stuff
  catt("somefunc: the end")
}

Notice how every call to catt begins with the name of the function it is called from. Very neat until I start to refactor my code and rename functions etc.

Thanks to some old R-list post from Brian Ripley, if I'm not mistaken, I found this code to get the 'current function name':

catw<-function(..., file = "", sep = " ", fill = FALSE, labels = NULL,
    append = FALSE)
{
    curcall<-sys.call(sys.parent(n=1))
    prefix<-paste(match.call(call=curcall)[[1]], ":", sep="")
    cat(prefix, ..., format(Sys.time(), "(%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S)"), "\n",
        file = file, sep = sep, fill = fill, labels = labels, append = append)
}

This is very nice, but it doesn't always work, because:

  • my functions are scattered with anonymous functions used in lapply type of functions, like this:
aFunc<-function(somedataframe)
{
  result<-lapply(seq_along(somedataframe), function(i){
  catw("working on col", i, "/", ncol(somedataframe))
  #do some more stuff here and return something
  return(sum(is.na(somedataframe[[i]])))
  }
}

-> for these cases, apparently (and understandably) I need n=3 in the sys.parent call in my catw function.

  • I occasionally use do.call: it appears my current implementation doesn't work either (once again I can somewhat understand it, though I haven't figured it out completely.

So, my question is: is there a way to find the first named function higher in the callstack (skipping the logging function itself, and maybe some other "wellknown" exceptions), which would allow me to write one single version of catw for all cases (so that I can happily refactor without worrying about my logging code)? How would you go about something like this?

Edit: these cases should be supported:

testa<-function(par1)
{
    catw("Hello from testa, par1=", par1)
    for(i in 1:2) catw("normal loop from testa, item", i)
    rv<-sapply(1:2, function(i){catw("sapply from testa, item", i);return(i)})
    return(rv)
}

testb<-function(par1, par2)
{
    catw("Hello from testb, par1=", par1)
    for(i in 1:2) catw("normal loop from testb, item", i)
    rv<-sapply(1:2, function(i){catw("sapply from testb, item", i);return(i)})

    catw("Will now call testa from testb")
    rv2<-testa(par1)
    catw("Back from testa call in testb")

    catw("Will now do.call testa from testb")
    rv2<-do.call(testa, list(par1))
    catw("Back from testa do.call in testb")

    return(list(rv, rv2))
}

testa(123)
testb(123,456)
do.call(testb, list(123,456))
share|improve this question
    
I frequently use message() in my functions to output a note to the console to tell me what what point R is at in the function. Perhaps, some implementation of message() and sink(...,type="message") would work for you? Downside is that you'd have to put it in all of your functions. –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 5 '11 at 14:09
    
Could a grep applied to the sys.call work, assuming you use a unique naming scheme for your functions? Selecting the first match should be the lowest in the set. –  Iterator Sep 5 '11 at 15:33
    
@Iterator: a naming scheme for functions is not an option right now. But I am willing to live with the opposite: excluding certain schemes (like ".*apply.*"). –  Nick Sabbe Sep 5 '11 at 15:44
    
@Nick. I erred. I use a naming scheme, but any list (okay, vector of character strings) of names that is unique to your set (package) should be adequate. Getting the list of base R functions (or maybe all functions when all nec. libraries are loaded) and running setdiff() should lead to such a list, if you prefer not to do it manually or don't have access to the namespace. Someone more familiar with R than I would know how to get this list. –  Iterator Sep 5 '11 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

EDIT : Complete rewrite of function

The new version of this function uses the call stack, sys.calls(), rather than match.call.

The call stack contains the complete calling function. So the trick now is to only extract the bits of it that you really want. I have resorted to a bit of manual cleanup in the clean_cs function. This evaluates the first word in the call stack and returns the desired argument for a small number of known edge cases, in particular lapply, sapply and do.call.

The only downside of this approach is that it will return function names all the way to the top of the call stack. Perhaps a logical next step would be to compare these functions with a spefified environment/namespace and include/exclude function names based on that...

I shall stop here. It answers to the use cases in the question.


The new function:

catw <- function(..., callstack=sys.calls()){
  cs <- callstack
  cs <- clean_cs(cs)
  #browser()
  message(paste(cs, ...))
}

clean_cs <- function(x){
  val <- sapply(x, function(xt){
    z <- strsplit(paste(xt, collapse="\t"), "\t")[[1]]
    switch(z[1],
        "lapply" = z[3], 
        "sapply" = z[3],
        "do.call" = z[2], 
        "function" = "FUN",
        "source" = "###",
        "eval.with.vis" = "###",
        z[1]
        )
    })
  val[grepl("\\<function\\>", val)] <- "FUN"
  val <- val[!grepl("(###|FUN)", val)]
  val <- head(val, -1)
  paste(val, collapse="|")
}

Test results:

testa Hello from testa, par1= 123
testa normal loop from testa, item 1
testa normal loop from testa, item 2
testa sapply from testa, item 1
testa sapply from testa, item 2


testb Hello from testb, par1= 123
testb normal loop from testb, item 1
testb normal loop from testb, item 2
testb sapply from testb, item 1
testb sapply from testb, item 2
testb Will now call testa from testb
testb|testa Hello from testa, par1= 123
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 1
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 2
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 1
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 2
testb Back from testa call in testb
testb Will now do.call testa from testb
testb|testa Hello from testa, par1= 123
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 1
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 2
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 1
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 2
testb Back from testa do.call in testb


testb Hello from testb, par1= 123
testb normal loop from testb, item 1
testb normal loop from testb, item 2
testb sapply from testb, item 1
testb sapply from testb, item 2
testb Will now call testa from testb
testb|testa Hello from testa, par1= 123
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 1
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 2
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 1
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 2
testb Back from testa call in testb
testb Will now do.call testa from testb
testb|testa Hello from testa, par1= 123
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 1
testb|testa normal loop from testa, item 2
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 1
testb|testa sapply from testa, item 2
testb Back from testa do.call in testb
share|improve this answer
    
what if my function holds nested sapply calls with anonymous functions (admitted, it's somewhat contrived). Your choice of nLevels<-3 will not cover that, right? I'm trying to use sys.parents() to avoid that, but I'm a bit stumped on when I need to add numbers to this (or how many), e.g. when I call this outside your sapply call. The docs are very terse on calls and stackframes. –  Nick Sabbe Sep 5 '11 at 15:51
1  
@NickSabbe, In my edited version I use sys.nframe to get the call stack depth, rather than specifying a fixed nlevels. I also use grep to remove apply, lapply, sapply and family. –  Andrie Sep 5 '11 at 21:16
    
Nearly there. I've got one more (nasty) challenge, though: what if I immediately call do.call(my.col, list(df)) ? This happens to me quite often, as I tend to save parameters to functions in lists during debugging, so I can easily (re)call them. In this case there is something strange happening, because now the result of sys.call(sys.parent(n=i))[[1]] appears to be a function (closure), but does not hold the name of the original function anymore :-( –  Nick Sabbe Sep 6 '11 at 8:15
1  
@NickSabbe Nice challenge, but it defeated me. Answer edited with best effort. –  Andrie Sep 6 '11 at 14:57
    
@NickSabbe Answer edited once more with a completely new approach. –  Andrie Sep 7 '11 at 8:38

I thought I'd add the progress made so far, based completely on Andrie's work. Pretty sure other people will enjoy this, so it is now a part of a package I'm developing (not on CRAN but on R-Forge for now) called addendum (including documentation) after the nightly build.

Function to find the 'current lowest named function' on the callstack with some bells and whistles:

curfnfinder<-function(skipframes=0, skipnames="(FUN)|(.+apply)|(replicate)",
    retIfNone="Not in function", retStack=FALSE, extraPrefPerLevel="\t")
{
    prefix<-sapply(3 + skipframes+1:sys.nframe(), function(i){
            currv<-sys.call(sys.parent(n=i))[[1]]
            return(currv)
        })
    prefix[grep(skipnames, prefix)] <- NULL
    prefix<-gsub("function \\(.*", "do.call", prefix)
    if(length(prefix)==0)
    {
        return(retIfNone)
    }
    else if(retStack)
    {
        return(paste(rev(prefix), collapse = "|"))
    }
    else
    {
        retval<-as.character(unlist(prefix[1]))
        if(length(prefix) > 1)
        {
            retval<-paste(paste(rep(extraPrefPerLevel, length(prefix) - 1), collapse=""), retval, sep="")
        }
        return(retval)
    }
}

This can be used in a logging function like this:

catw<-function(..., file = "", sep = " ", fill = FALSE, labels = NULL,
    append = FALSE, prefix=0)
{
    if(is.numeric(prefix))
    {
        prefix<-curfnfinder(skipframes=prefix+1) #note: the +1 is there to avoid returning catw itself
        prefix<-paste(prefix, ":", sep="")
    }
    cat(prefix, ..., format(Sys.time(), "(%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S)"), "\n",
        file = file, sep = sep, fill = fill, labels = labels, append = append)
}

As mentioned in the comments to Andrie's answer so far, there are still some issues regarding do.call. I'm going to stop spending time on it for now, but have posted the related question on the r-devel mailinglist. If/when I get a response there, and it is usable, I will update the functions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.