Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I cannot explain myself the following code:

   double d = 100;

    double const d1 = 30;

    double* const p = &d; // Line 1
    double* const p1 = &d1; // Line 2

In the above code, Line 1 is ok, but Line 2 produces the error:

"error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'const double *__w64 ' to 'double *const '"

Can anyone elaborate on that, please? (I am using VS C++ 2005, running on Win XP SP3)

share|improve this question
3  
please, read this: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/const-correctness.html#faq-18.5 –  Adam Jurczyk Sep 5 '11 at 14:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The type double* const is a const pointer to a non-const double. If you want a pointer to a const double, you have to use double const* (or double const* const if you want a const pointer to a const double).

In C++, with a simple pointer to a double, you the const-ness of both the pointer itself (ie, can you make it point at another location) and the const-ness of the value (can you change the value through the pointer) can be configured independently. This gives you four very similar, but incompatibles types:

double const* const p1; // Const pointer to const double
                        //  . you can't have the pointer point to another address
                        //  . you can't mutate the value through the pointer

double const* p2;       // Non-const pointer to const double
                        //  . you can have the pointer point to another address
                        //  . you can't mutate the value through the pointer

double* const p3;       // Const pointer to double
                        //  . you can't have the pointer point to another address
                        //  . you can mutate the value through the pointer

double* p4;             // Non-const pointer to non-const double
                        //  . you can have the pointer point to another address
                        //  . you can mutate the value through the pointer
share|improve this answer
1  
This means he needs to use double const* const, right? –  wormsparty Sep 5 '11 at 14:12
    
@wormsparty: he doesn't need to, no. double const *p2 = &d1; is fine. The const in the definitions of p and p1 prevent them from later being altered to contain a different address, so if he needs that, in addition to needing to be able to point to a const double such as d1, then he would need double const *const. –  Steve Jessop Sep 5 '11 at 14:24
    
As d1 is a const int so this would do: const double* p1 = &d1; –  Gob00st Sep 5 '11 at 14:32

You may understand the code easily in the following manner.

double const d1 = 30;
double* const p1 = &d1;

Here in line 2, the problem is we are assigning a const value d1 to non-const value which can be changed in future.

It would be easier if we understand the data type of right side value to the left side value.

In our case, right side datatype can be treated as pointer to const double where as left side is a pointer to double, which contradicts and a compilor error is thrown.

share|improve this answer

It is easier if you read declarations right to left:

double const *       p; // pointer to const double
const double *       p; // pointer to const double
double       * const p; // const pointer to double
double const * const p; // const pointer to const double
share|improve this answer

double * const p1 is declaring a const pointer to a non-const double, i.e. the pointer can change (i.e. it can be re-pointed), but not the thing that it's pointing to. But d1 is const.

Did you mean:

const double* p = &d; // Line 1
const double* p1 = &d1; // Line 2

?

[See also this question from the C++ FAQ.]

share|improve this answer
    
I'd recommend writing double const *. It's equivalent to const double *, but you can do with simple rule "const applies to everything in front of it" without the need of extra rule "const at the beginning applies to the innermost type". –  Jan Hudec Sep 5 '11 at 14:19
    
@Jan: I see your logic, but ultimately it's personal preference. I read the above definition as "p is a pointer to a const double"; for me, that's not at all confusing. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 5 '11 at 14:22
1  
@Jan: Personally I think one major benefit of teaching it your way, is that writing const first lures people into thinking that typedef char *cptr; typedef const cptr ccptr; is the same as typedef const char *ccptr;. They're less likely to think that if they wrote typedef char const *ccptr; all along. Even so, I still tend to write it Oli's way given the freedom, and in related news, also to write const int i = 0; rather than int const i = 0;. –  Steve Jessop Sep 5 '11 at 14:30
    
@Steve, @Oli: Yes, I usually write const first too. But it's a special-case, so for explaining I'd still recommend starting from the postfix one. –  Jan Hudec Sep 6 '11 at 6:41
    
@Steve: Yet you put the typedef out in front. Why? Why not char typedef * cptr; Or int volatile long typedef unsigned const long Foo; ? The language doesn't care. I like to see the qualifiers up-front, with typedef always being first. (Note well: I am not saying that combining volatile and const makes much sense ...) –  David Hammen Sep 6 '11 at 10:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.