Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an HttpListener that for each request received launches a winform and returns an array of byte representing an image. This image is taken by the winform once it executes some commands parsed from request's querystring. Any winforms is executing inside a different Thread.

Right now after the winform has done its job, it comes up with an array of byte as the response and then its thread died, if the same user makes a new request a new thread (with a new winform) is created.

I'm guessing if I can maintain each thread, using an ID for each user (IP address, a GUID, cookie), so I don't have to recreate the winform every time and at the same time the winform will maintain previous state.

Is it possible? Or I have to move to another direction or design?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using WinForms in a server application? – shf301 Sep 5 '11 at 15:11
    
It's a constrain of my project, each winform, using OpenGL, draws something on the screen to be captured an returned to the client. – JasonMenny Sep 5 '11 at 15:17
    
@JasonMenny - you don't actually need a presentation surface; do everything in a backbuffer and render it to an image. – Jonathan Dickinson Sep 5 '11 at 15:59

You could change the design to workers/tasks approach, defining separately the worker pool (thread+Form) and the task pool. That done, you can decide wether to create a new thread/form pair to handle a task or reuse an existing one, you can choose the number of workers to run, limiting the risk of over consuming the server resources. But using Winforms on a server side is definitely not the best way, as shf301 pointed out.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.