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I just started trying out node.js a few days ago. I've realized that the Node is terminated whenever I have an unhandled exception in my program. This is different than the normal server container that I have been exposed to where only the Worker Thread dies when unhandled exceptions occur and the container would still be able to receive the request. This raises a few questions:

  • Is process.on('uncaughtException') the only effective way to guard against it?
  • Will process.on('uncaughtException') catch the unhandled exception during execution of asynchronous processes as well?
  • Is there a module that is already built (such as sending email or writing to a file) that I could leverage in the case of uncaught exceptions?

I would appreciate any pointer/article that would show me the common best practices for handling uncaught exceptions in node.js

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8  
uncaught exceptions should not happen. If they do use a program that restarts your entire application when its crashing (nodemon, forever, supervisor) –  Raynos Sep 5 '11 at 20:36
57  
Uncaught exceptions can always happen unless you put every piece of your asynchronous code inside try .. catch, and check this is also done for all your libs –  Dan Mar 29 '12 at 14:46
6  
+1 Dan At first I thought all your libs was a bit of an exaggeration, as you "only" need to wrap all your "thread entry points" in the code in try/catches. But thinking about it more carefully, any lib could have a setTimeout or setInterval or something of that kind buried somewhere deep which cannot be caught by your code. –  Eugene Beresovksy Nov 29 '12 at 7:22
5  
@EugeneBeresovksy Dan is right but it doesn't change the fact that when uncaughtExceptions occur the only safe option is to restart the app. In other words your app has crashed and there's nothing you can do or should do about it. If you want to do something constructive implement the new, and still experimental, v0.8 domain feature so you can log the crash and send a 5xx response to your client. –  ajostergaard Jan 1 '13 at 13:03
1  
@Dan Even enclosing all callback functions in try .. catch doesn't guarantee catching errors. In the case that a required module uses it's own binaries they can crash ungracefully. I've had this happen with phantomjs-node, failing on errors that are impossible to catch (unless I was to do some kind of process inspection on required binaries, but I never pursued that). –  Trindaz Jan 8 '13 at 3:31

9 Answers 9

up vote 309 down vote accepted

Update: Joyent now has their own guide mentioned in this answer. The following information is more of a summary:

Safely "throwing" errors

Ideally we'd like to avoid uncaught errors as much as possible, as such, instead of literally throwing the error, we can instead safely "throw" the error using one of the following methods depending on our code architecture:

  • For synchronous code, if an error happens, return the error:

    // Define divider as a syncrhonous function
    var divideSync = function(x,y) {
        // if error condition?
        if ( y === 0 ) {
            // "throw" the error safely by returning it
            return new Error("Can't divide by zero");
        }
        else {
            // no error occured, continue on
            return x/y;
        }
    };
    
    // Divide 4/2
    var result;
    result = divideSync(4,2);
    // did an error occur?
    if ( result instanceof Error ) {
        // handle the error safely
        console.log('4/2=err', result);
    }
    else {
        // no error occured, continue on
        console.log('4/2='+result);
    }
    
    // Divide 4/0
    result = divideSync(4,0);
    // did an error occur?
    if ( result instanceof Error ) {
        // handle the error safely
        console.log('4/0=err', result);
    }
    else {
        // no error occured, continue on
        console.log('4/0='+result);
    }
    
  • For callback-based (ie. asynchronous) code, the first argument of the callback is err, if an error happens err is the error, if an error doesn't happen then err is null. Any other arguments follow the err argument:

    var divide = function(x,y,next) {
        // if error condition?
        if ( y === 0 ) {
            // "throw" the error safely by calling the completion callback
            // with the first argument being the error
            next(new Error("Can't divide by zero"));
        }
        else {
            // no error occured, continue on
            next(null, x/y);
        }
    };
    
    divide(4,2,function(err,result){
        // did an error occur?
        if ( err ) {
            // handle the error safely
            console.log('4/2=err', err);
        }
        else {
            // no error occured, continue on
            console.log('4/2='+result);
        }
    });
    
    divide(4,0,function(err,result){
        // did an error occur?
        if ( err ) {
            // handle the error safely
            console.log('4/0=err', err);
        }
        else {
            // no error occured, continue on
            console.log('4/0='+result);
        }
    });
    
  • For eventful code, where the error may happen anywhere, instead of throwing the error, fire the error event instead:

    // Definite our Divider Event Emitter
    var events = require('events');
    var Divider = function(){
        events.EventEmitter.call(this);
    };  require('util').inherits(Divider, events.EventEmitter);
    
    // Add the divide function
    Divider.prototype.divide = function(x,y){
        // if error condition?
        if ( y === 0 ) {
            // "throw" the error safely by emitting it
            var err = new Error("Can't divide by zero");
            this.emit('error', err);
        }
        else {
            // no error occured, continue on
            this.emit('divided', x, y, x/y);
        }
    
        // Chain
        return this;
    };
    
    // Create our divider and listen for errors
    var divider = new Divider();
    divider.on('error', function(err){
        // handle the error safely
        console.log(err);
    });
    divider.on('divided', function(x,y,result){
        console.log(x+'/'+y+'='+result);
    });
    
    // Divide
    divider.divide(4,2).divide(4,0);
    

Safely "catching" errors

Sometimes though, there may still be code that throws an error somewhere which can lead to an uncaught exception and a potential crash of our application if we don't catch it safely. Depending on our code architecture we can use one of the following methods to catch it:

  • When we know where the error is occurring, we can wrap that section in a node.js domain

    var d = require('domain').create();
    d.on('error', function(err){
        // handle the error safely
        console.log(err);
    });
    
    // catch the uncaught errors in this asynchronous or synchronous code block
    d.run(function(){
        // the asynchronous or synchronous code that we want to catch thrown errors on
        var err = new Error('example');
        throw err;
    });
    
  • If we know where the error is occurring is synchronous code, and for whatever reason can't use domains (perhaps old version of node), we can use the try catch statement:

    // catch the uncaught errors in this synchronous code block
    // try catch statements only work on synchronous code
    try {
        // the synchronous code that we want to catch thrown errors on
        var err = new Error('example');
        throw err;
    } catch (err) {
        // handle the error safely
        console.log(err);
    }
    
  • However, there may still be a case where an uncaught error happens in a place that wasn't wrapped in a domain or a try catch statement, in which case to make our application not crash we can use the uncaughtException listener (however doing so can put the application in an unknown state):

    // catch the uncaught errors that weren't wrapped in a domain or try catch statement
    // do not use this in modules, but only in applications, as otherwise we could have multiple of these bound
    process.on('uncaughtException', function(err) {
        // handle the error safely
        console.log(err);
    });
    
    // the asynchronous or synchronous code that emits the otherwise uncaught error
    var err = new Error('example');
    throw err;
    
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1  
@momo I've updated the question to be more explanatory :-) Let me know if you're still not sure about anything :) –  balupton Sep 5 '11 at 23:40
4  
Thanks Raynos, updated. Do you have a source which explains the evils of try catch? As I'd love to back that up with evidence. Also fixed the sync example. –  balupton Sep 5 '11 at 23:50
11  
Just want to update the process.on("uncaughtException" .., It is now deprecated. nodejs.org/api/process.html#process_event_uncaughtexception –  Arly Aug 18 '12 at 1:58
2  
This answer is no longer valid. Domains solves this problem (recommended by node.js) –  Gabriel Llamas Feb 4 '13 at 13:54
3  
Updated it for domains and events. Feedback welcome. –  balupton Apr 11 '13 at 2:37

You can catch uncaught exceptions, but it's of limited use. See http://debuggable.com/posts/node-js-dealing-with-uncaught-exceptions:4c933d54-1428-443c-928d-4e1ecbdd56cb

monit, forever or upstart can be used to restart node process when it crashes. A graceful shutdown is best you can hope for (e.g. save all in-memory data in uncaught exception handler).

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3  
+1 The link is useful, thanks. I am still looking for the best practice and the meaning of "graceful restart" in the context of node.js –  momo Sep 5 '11 at 20:43
    
My understanding of "graceful restart" in this context would be essentially what nponeccop suggests: let the process die, and let whatever is running it in the first place restart it. –  Ilkka Dec 29 '11 at 18:26
    
Thanks a lot for that link! Really useful! –  SatheeshJM Sep 13 '12 at 3:38

nodejs domains is the most up to date way of handling errors in nodejs. Domains can capture both error/other events as well as traditionally thrown objects. Domains also provide functionality for handling callbacks with an error passed as the first argument via the intercept method.

As with normal try/catch-style error handling, is is usually best to throw errors when they occur, and block out areas where you want to isolate errors from affecting the rest of the code. The way to "block out" these areas are to call domain.run with a function as a block of isolated code.

In synchronous code, the above is enough - when an error happens you either let it be thrown through, or you catch it and handle there, reverting any data you need to revert.

try {  
  //something
} catch(e) {
  // handle data reversion
  // probably log too
}

When the error happens in an asynchronous callback, you either need to be able to fully handle the rollback of data (shared state, external data like databases, etc). OR you have to set something to indicate that an exception has happened - where ever you care about that flag, you have to wait for the callback to complete.

var err = null;
var d = require('domain').create();
d.on('error', function(e) {
  err = e;
  // any additional error handling
}
d.run(function() { Fiber(function() {
  // do stuff
  var future = somethingAsynchronous();
  // more stuff

  future.wait(); // here we care about the error
  if(err != null) {
    // handle data reversion
    // probably log too
  }

})});

Some of that above code is ugly, but you can create patterns for yourself to make it prettier, eg:

var specialDomain = specialDomain(function() {
  // do stuff
  var future = somethingAsynchronous();
  // more stuff

  future.wait(); // here we care about the error
  if(specialDomain.error()) {
    // handle data reversion
    // probably log too
  } 
}, function() { // "catch"
  // any additional error handling
});

UPDATE (2013-09):

Above, I use a future that implies fibers semantics, which allow you to wait on futures in-line. This actually allows you to use traditional try-catch blocks for everything - which I find to be the best way to go. However, you can't always do this (ie in the browser)...

There are also futures that don't require fibers semantics (which then work with normal, browsery JavaScript). These can be called futures, promises, or deferreds (I'll just refer to futures from here on). Plain-old-JavaScript futures libraries allow errors to be propagated between futures. Only some of these libraries allow any thrown future to be correctly handled, so beware.

An example:

returnsAFuture().then(function() {
  console.log('1')
  return doSomething() // also returns a future

}).then(function() {
  console.log('2')
  throw Error("oops an error was thrown")

}).then(function() {
  console.log('3')

}).catch(function(exception) {
  console.log('handler')
  // handle the exception
}).done()

This mimics a normal try-catch, even though the pieces are asynchronous. It would print:

1
2
handler

Note that it doesn't print '3' because an exception was thrown that interrupts that flow.

Take a look at these libraries:

Note that I haven't found many other libraries other than these that properly handle thrown exceptions. jQuery's deferred, for example, don't - the "fail" handler would never get the exception thrown an a 'then' handler, which in my opinion is a deal breaker.

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The proper promises specification in Javascript is known as Promises/A+. You may see a list of implementations here: github.com/promises-aplus/promises-spec/blob/master/…. Note that a bare Promises/A+ is unusable in practice - Promises/A+ still leaves a lot of practical problems for libraries to solve themselves. However absolutely essential things like the error propagation you show, deterministic execution order and safety from stack overflow are guaranteed. –  Esailija Oct 28 '13 at 8:37

I wrote about this recently at http://snmaynard.com/2012/12/21/node-error-handling/. A new feature of node in version 0.8 is domains and allow you to combine all the forms of error handling into one easier manage form. You can read about them in my post.

You can also use something like Bugsnag to track your uncaught exceptions and be notified via email, chatroom or have a ticket created for an uncaught exception (I am the co-founder of Bugsnag).

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You may want to read Error Handling in Node.js.
It's a very thorough document published by Joyent.

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That link is already included in the top answer so we can delete this answer (your reputation points will be preserved). –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 4 at 21:22

I would just like to add that Step.js library helps you handle exceptions by always passing it to the next step function. Therefore you can have as a last step a function that check for any errors in any of the previous steps. This approach can greatly simplify your error handling.

Below is a quote from the github page:

any exceptions thrown are caught and passed as the first argument to the next function. As long as you don't nest callback functions inline your main functions this prevents there from ever being any uncaught exceptions. This is very important for long running node.JS servers since a single uncaught exception can bring the whole server down.

Furthermore, you can use Step to control execution of scripts to have a clean up section as the last step. For example if you want to write a build script in Node and report how long it took to write, the last step can do that (rather than trying to dig out the last callback).

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One instance where using a try-catch might be appropriate is when using a forEach loop. It is synchronous but at the same time you cannot just use a return statement in the inner scope. Instead a try and catch approach can be used to return an Error object in the appropriate scope. Consider:

function processArray() {
    try { 
       [1, 2, 3].forEach(function() { throw new Error('exception'); }); 
    } catch (e) { 
       return e; 
    }
}

It is a combination of the approaches described by @balupton above.

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After reading this post some time ago I was wondering if it was safe to use domains for exception handling on an api / function level. I wanted to use them to simplify exception handling code in each async function I wrote. My concern was that using a new domain for each function would introduce significant overhead. My homework seems to indicate that there is minimal overhead and that performance is actually better with domains than with try catch in some situations.

http://www.lighthouselogic.com/#/using-a-new-domain-for-each-async-function-in-node/

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