Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to output a series of times in hour (on the hour) intervals within Javascript (so inside a web browser such as Firefox). This series of times will overlap the short day (losing an hour in spring) and long day (gaining an hour in autumn). The output I'm looking for is in local time, i.e. with timezone and DST offsets applied. So for example, in the UK we have a missing hour from 01:00 to 01:59 on the short day such that the output would be:

00:00, 02:00, 03:00

And on the long day we have an extra hour from 01:00 to 02:00 such that the output would be:

00:00, 01:00, 01:00, 02:00, 03:00

I have already found these two brilliant answers that highlight some pitfalls and address part of my problem:

But the real difficulty is in making javascript aware of this missing and extra hour (so to speak) as identified in the second question mentioned above.

I think a potential solution to this would be to operate in UTC (aka GMT) and just do a conversion to local time but I'm struggling to see how I could do this.

Does anyone have any ideas about how to achive what I'm after?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

If you have a fixed timezone, the following javascript code seems to work (tested on the last chrome version and firefox 6) :

 // set the date to 11 / 04 / 2012 at 00:00 UTC
 var date = new Date(1331424000000);
 for(var i = 1; i <= 12; i++) {   
     $('.data-dston').append(' ' + date.getHours() + ':00, ');
     date = new Date(date.getTime() + 3600000)
 }

 // set the date to 04 / 11 / 2012 at 00:00 UTC
 var date = new Date(1351987200000);
 for(var i = 1; i <= 12; i++) {   
     $('.data-dstoff').append(' ' + date.getHours() + ':00, ');
     date = new Date(date.getTime() + 3600000)
 }

Here's a JSFiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/Vsd2A/3/ to see the code in action !

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Krtek, I have taken your example and adapted it as shown in my answer. –  A. Murray Sep 9 '11 at 10:49

Adapting what Krtek has come up with (for my timezone - UK) I now have the following:

// set the date to 27 / 03 / 2011 at 00:00 UTC
var date = new Date('27 Mar 2011 00:00');
for(var i = 1; i <= 12; i++)
{   
    $('.data-dston').append(' ' + date.getHours() + ':00, ');
    date.setTime(date.getTime() + 3600000);
}

// set the date to 30 / 10 / 2011 at 00:00 UTC
var date = new Date('30 Oct 2011 00:00');
for(var i = 1; i <= 12; i++)
{   
    $('.data-dstoff').append(' ' + date.getHours() + ':00, ');
    date.setTime(date.getTime() + 3600000)
}

Which has the benefit of not having to construct a new object on each iteration.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.