Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an integer that gets incremented

I then want this in hex so I do the conversion like so: myInt.ToString("X");

I then need a string in the format of 00 00 00 00 but I cannot work out a way to convert the hex string I now have into this format.

share|improve this question
2  
If it has an odd number of hex digits does it need to be zero-padded (e.g. 07 FF FF FF)? –  BoltClock Sep 5 '11 at 16:38
    
Yes, it is always 8 characters long with spaces between every 2 –  Jon Sep 5 '11 at 17:18
    
@Jon - check out my edited answer, the new method is exactly what you are looking for (without a loop). –  Jonathan Dickinson Sep 5 '11 at 17:34
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With a Linq query you can do this:

string.Join(" ", BitConverter.GetBytes(myInt).Select(x=>x.ToString("x")).ToArray());
share|improve this answer
1  
And the ToArray call is no longer needed in .NET4! –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 5 '11 at 16:43
1  
It doesn´t. Actually, it´s not padding left each byte component of the string. if you change the x.ToString("x"), to x.ToString("x").PadLeft(2,'0') it will work eaxclty as he asked for. –  Adilson de Almeida Jr Sep 5 '11 at 17:07
1  
This is still wrong, for example if myInt was equal to 200, even adding PadLeft the result is wrong. the result would be C8 00 00 00, You would also have to add a Reverse() call. –  Gabe Sep 5 '11 at 17:08
1  
@Adilson you forgot of endianness :-) –  xanatos Sep 5 '11 at 17:19
1  
Is there an echo in here? –  Gabe Sep 5 '11 at 17:24
show 3 more comments

Fun Mode On Part 1

I can use Regexes for replace! Wozza!!!

string str = Regex.Replace(
    String.Format("{0:X8}", myVal), 
    "([0-9A-F]{2})([0-9A-F]{2})([0-9A-F]{2})([0-9A-F]{2})", 
    "$1 $2 $3 $4"
);

I'm writing the number in 8 digits hex format with the String.Format and then I'm inserting the spaces using a Regex. Yes, it's overkill and useless :-)

Seriously

string str = String.Format(
    "{0:X2} {1:X2} {2:X2} {3:X2}", 
    (myVal >> 24) & 0xFF, 
    (myVal >> 16) & 0xFF, 
    (myVal >> 8) & 0xFF, 
    myVal & 0xFF);

Taking a piece at a time using shifts and an "&& Mask" and composing them using String.Format in Hex formatting with padding 2.

Don't use them with negative numbers, please!

Fun Mode On Part 2 (The Return of the Angry Regex)

string str = Regex.Replace(
    String.Format("{0:X8}", myVal), 
    "([0-9A-F]{2})(?!$)", 
    "$1 "
);

Here we search for groups of 2 Hex digits that aren't at the end of the string and add a space after them (We could have used \B (remember to escape) instead of (?!$))

share|improve this answer
4  
"Now you have two problems." –  Seva Alekseyev Sep 5 '11 at 17:11
    
@Seva I think he has O(n^n) problems actually. –  Jonathan Dickinson Sep 5 '11 at 17:15
    
The complete quote (from Jamie Zawinski): Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems. I always wanted to use a Regex to do a replace and I was only able to do it in a text editor till now :-) –  xanatos Sep 5 '11 at 20:16
    
Here in Brazil the "Regex solution" is often called "Evil Legacy". But I, personally enjoy this kind of code. –  Adilson de Almeida Jr Sep 5 '11 at 22:21
add comment

You can specify the number of hex digits using a number after the 'x' (e.g. 'x2'). A lower-case 'x' will give you lower-case hex, and visa-versa with an upper-case one.

The following methods will the the least wasteful you will find:

/// <summary>
/// Converts the specified byte array into a delimited list of hex pairs.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="values">The values.</param>
/// <param name="requiredLength">The required length (in bytes) required.</param>
/// <param name="delimiter">The delimiter.</param>
/// <returns>The binary value.</returns>
static string ToBinaryString(byte[] values, int requiredLength, string delimiter, bool allowLonger)
{
    if (values == null)
        return null;
    if (values.Length > requiredLength)
    {
        if (allowLonger)
            requiredLength = values.Length;
        else
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("values");
    }

    // Create the StringBuilder with the precise length of values.
    var sb = new StringBuilder((2 + delimiter.Length) * requiredLength - delimiter.Length);

    var padLength = requiredLength - values.Length;
    for (var i = 0; i < padLength; i++)
        sb.Append(sb.Length == 0 ? "" : delimiter)
          .Append("00");
    for (var i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
        sb.Append(sb.Length == 0 ? "" : delimiter)
          .Append(values[i].ToString("x2"));

    return sb.ToString();
}

/// <summary>
/// Converts the specified byte array into a delimited list of hex pairs.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="values">The values.</param>
/// <param name="delimiter">The delimiter.</param>
/// <returns>
/// The binary value.
/// </returns>
static string ToBinaryString(byte[] values, string delimiter)
{
    return ToBinaryString(values, 0, delimiter, true);
}

EDIT: If you have an Int32 the following would work without unessecary allocations:

/// <summary>
/// Converts the specified <see cref="Int32"/> into a delimited list of hex pairs.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="values">The values.</param>
/// <param name="delimiter">The delimiter.</param>
/// <returns>The binary value.</returns>
static string ToBinaryString(int value, string delimeter)
{
    var u = (uint)IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder(value);
    var sb = new StringBuilder((2 + delimeter.Length) * 4 - delimeter.Length);
    sb.Append(((u >> 0) & 0xFF).ToString("x2")).Append(delimeter);
    sb.Append(((u >> 8) & 0xFF).ToString("x2")).Append(delimeter);
    sb.Append(((u >> 16) & 0xFF).ToString("x2")).Append(delimeter);
    sb.Append(((u >> 24) & 0xFF).ToString("x2"));
    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.