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New to php .I'm working on an old code in which I have to add many new features. The code doesn't use any object oriented features of php5 right now but I'll be using them and will try to refactor important and complex old stuff in free time.

I've couple of questions :
1. Being someone coming from java background,ability to access outside functions from within a class seems so wrong which I have to do in order to reuse old functions. Is this a right thing to do ?... feels so unnatural to me, is there any better way to reuse old functions ?

2. Can someone suggest some good design patterns that can be used with old php code to make it little object oriented and make it elegantly work with new features.

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check out: PHP 5 Objects, Patterns, and Practice –  ldg Sep 5 '11 at 16:49
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5 Answers

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  1. Being someone coming from java background,ability to access outside functions from within a class seems so wrong which I have to do in order to reuse old functions

    This has always irked me about Java.

    There is nothing wrong whatsoever with free functions. The mantra that "everything must be in an object in OOP" is complete rubbish; only things that logically fit inside object types should be so.

    So don't worry about it at all.

  2. Can someone suggest some good design patterns that can be used with old php code to make it little object oriented and make it elegantly work with new features.

    No design pattern is going to do your refactoring for you.

    Design patterns are not magic bullets; the phrase is horribly over-used, and is merely a way to describe oft-used design conventions. Browse through a list of patterns on Wikipedia if you really want, but instead I'd just write your code in the most logical way and if, afterwards, you notice that it happens to conform to someone's idea of a "design pattern" then... well, good for you I guess!

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Here are my thoughts:

  1. Unless you have a lot of testing that can ensure that you don't break everything while you refactor your code to utilize an Object Oriented design, I wouldn't recommend changing the way the existing code works. You can accomplish this by wrapping the old functions into logical groupings through the creation of Facade classes that either pass through the functionality to your existing code, or call several of the functions in your existing code if a more complex operation is needed. Your new code would consist of objects that interact with the legacy Facade as needed, and implement the new functionality using proper OO design.
  2. One thing I think is necessary if you are planning to refactor the old code, is to have proper testing in place. I would take a look at SimpleTest if you don't already have proper testing. As far as design patterns go, it would depend heavily on the goals your existing code is trying to accomplish.
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  1. You can simply encapsulate the call of this functions in objects implementing particular interfaces
  2. Refer to 1. This is a general rule; just identify some logic "modules" that are currently implemented through different functions and encapsulate and hide this functions behind objects and interfaces.
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You could encapsulate access to the old code using the facade pattern to give you a clean interface between your code and the old code.

I have done this quite succesfully with legacy code that was quite badly written (mine, I'm ashamed to say!), were rewriting was not an option.

I finished with a nice clean interface which could be modified easily and was easy to read. It was well worth the extra effort and allowed me to refactor the old code at my leisure as and when time permits (still working on that).

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I an idea more than anything.

If in Java you have ever made a static method such as MyClass::someStaticMethod( parameter ) then it's like using a 'free' function.

That's what static methods are really. They're accessible globally and all it really is is a really long name, but otherwise it's a free method.

You might have put them in a 'class' but really it's java's way of creating global functions in a limited sense. If you think about it this way, php free functions don't seem so bad since their names are shorter.

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