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For a System.Windows.Forms.TextBox with Multiline=True, I'd like to only show the scrollbars when the text doesn't fit.

This is a readonly textbox used only for display. It's a TextBox so that users can copy the text out. Is there anything built-in to support auto show of scrollbars? If not, should I be using a different control? Or do I need to hook TextChanged and manually check for overflow (if so, how to tell if the text fits?)


Not having any luck with various combinations of WordWrap and Scrollbars settings. I'd like to have no scrollbars initially and have each appear dynamically only if the text doesn't fit in the given direction.


@nobugz, thanks, that works when WordWrap is disabled. I'd prefer not to disable wordwrap, but it's the lesser of two evils.


@André Neves, good point, and I would go that way if it was user-editable. I agree that consistency is the cardinal rule for UI intuitiveness.

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Why do you reply to people's answers in the question like that? Why not comment on the answer itself? :/ –  aaaidan Aug 1 '12 at 23:07
2  
This question was asked when StackOverflow was young and either didn't have comments on answers or I didn't have enough rep to comment on an answer. –  Aidan Ryan Aug 1 '12 at 23:15
1  
Ah right ... 2008: well before I was born. –  aaaidan Aug 2 '12 at 4:01
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Add a new class to your project and paste the code shown below. Compile. Drop the new control from the top of the toolbox onto your form. It's not quite perfect but ought to work for you.

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Windows.Forms;

public class MyTextBox : TextBox {
  private bool mScrollbars;
  public MyTextBox() {
    this.Multiline = true;
    this.ReadOnly = true;
  }
  private void checkForScrollbars() {
    bool scroll = false;
    int cnt = this.Lines.Length;
    if (cnt > 1) {
      int pos0 = this.GetPositionFromCharIndex(this.GetFirstCharIndexFromLine(0)).Y;
      if (pos0 >= 32768) pos0 -= 65536;
      int pos1 = this.GetPositionFromCharIndex(this.GetFirstCharIndexFromLine(1)).Y;
      if (pos1 >= 32768) pos1 -= 65536;
      int h = pos1 - pos0;
      scroll = cnt * h > (this.ClientSize.Height - 6);  // 6 = padding
    }
    if (scroll != mScrollbars) {
      mScrollbars = scroll;
      this.ScrollBars = scroll ? ScrollBars.Vertical : ScrollBars.None;
    }
  }

  protected override void OnTextChanged(EventArgs e) {
    checkForScrollbars();
    base.OnTextChanged(e);
  }

  protected override void OnClientSizeChanged(EventArgs e) {
    checkForScrollbars();
    base.OnClientSizeChanged(e);
  }
}
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2  
This only works if you are explicitly adding newlines into the text. If you want to show a long line of text with word wrap, this approach does not work, as the TextBox.Lines will always be 1. Just thought I'd throw that out there, since that was the case I was looking for and this didn't quite solve the problem. –  Tim Mar 14 '12 at 16:45
    
Already mentioned in the OP. Click the Ask Question button to find help. –  Hans Passant Mar 14 '12 at 16:48
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I came across this question when I wanted to solve the same problem.

The easiest way to do it is to change to System.Windows.Forms.RichTextBox. The ScrollBars property in this case can be left to the default value of RichTextBoxScrollBars.Both, which indicates "Display both a horizontal and a vertical scroll bar when needed." It would be nice if this functionality were provided on TextBox.

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+1: Simple, use RichTextBox instead. Worked for me. Thanks lax –  MattH Sep 29 '09 at 10:11
2  
Bear in mind RichTextBox is made for RTF text and bears a heavy rendering and processing cost compared to a multiline TextBox. I'd advise against using it unless you do want to display rich text. –  Camille Dec 13 '11 at 0:00
    
I have used this RichTextBox solution, with no negative side-effects. I believe that in most cases Camille's worry is not warranted. Thank you user73892. –  radim Nov 12 '13 at 18:27
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I also made some experiments, and found that the vertical bar will always show if you enable it, and the horizontal bar always shows as long as it's enabled and WordWrap == false.

I think you're not going to get exactly what you want here. However, I believe that users would like better Windows' default behavior than the one you're trying to force. If I were using your app, I probably would be bothered if my textbox real-estate suddenly shrinked just because it needs to accomodate an unexpected scrollbar because I gave it too much text!

Perhaps it would be a good idea just to let your application follow Windows' look and feel.

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There's an extremely subtle bug in nobugz's solution that results in a heap corruption, but only if you're using AppendText() to update the TextBox.

Setting the ScrollBars property from OnTextChanged will cause the Win32 window (handle) to be destroyed and recreated. But OnTextChanged is called from the bowels of the Win32 edit control (EditML_InsertText), which immediately thereafter expects the internal state of that Win32 edit control to be unchanged. Unfortunately, since the window is recreated, that internal state has been freed by the OS, resulting in an access violation.

So the moral of the story is: don't use AppendText() if you're going to use nobugz's solution.

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I have an access violation issue that seems related to displaying a form with a TextBox (stackoverflow.com/q/7458915/68936). After seeing your post, I thought it might have been due to calling AppendText(). However, I replaced the call to AppendText with just TextBox.Text =, and the access violation still occurs once in a while. From your answer, am I to understand that TextBox.Text = should be ok, and AppendText() not? Or do they both suffer from the same issue (wouldn't they both call OnTextChanged?) –  Jimmy Mar 6 '12 at 18:30
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I had some success with the code below.

  public partial class MyTextBox : TextBox
  {
    private bool mShowScrollBar = false;

    public MyTextBox()
    {
      InitializeComponent();

      checkForScrollbars();
    }

    private void checkForScrollbars()
    {
      bool showScrollBar = false;
      int padding = (this.BorderStyle == BorderStyle.Fixed3D) ? 14 : 10;

      using (Graphics g = this.CreateGraphics())
      {
        // Calcualte the size of the text area.
        SizeF textArea = g.MeasureString(this.Text,
                                         this.Font,
                                         this.Bounds.Width - padding);

        if (this.Text.EndsWith(Environment.NewLine))
        {
          // Include the height of a trailing new line in the height calculation        
          textArea.Height += g.MeasureString("A", this.Font).Height;
        }

        // Show the vertical ScrollBar if the text area
        // is taller than the control.
        showScrollBar = (Math.Ceiling(textArea.Height) >= (this.Bounds.Height - padding));

        if (showScrollBar != mShowScrollBar)
        {
          mShowScrollBar = showScrollBar;
          this.ScrollBars = showScrollBar ? ScrollBars.Vertical : ScrollBars.None;
        }
      }
    }

    protected override void OnTextChanged(EventArgs e)
    {
      checkForScrollbars();
      base.OnTextChanged(e);
    }

    protected override void OnResize(EventArgs e)
    {
      checkForScrollbars();
      base.OnResize(e);
    }
  }
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Play a bit with the combination of the Multiline, WordWrap and ScrollBars property and see what happens. Windows does normally just what I want.

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