Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This has been bugging me for about 4 hours, so I thought it's time to seek some help. I can't find anything similar online, but mainly because the values are quite specific and I'm not really sure what to look for...

This is a problem I'm having with an Oracle script, running in SQLPlus 10.2.0.5.

The Problem:

(Names and real data has been changed to protect the identity of the suspects) I have a table called MONKEYS and a table called MONKEY_PUZZLES, which look a bit like this:

MONKEYS

  • MONKEY_ID
  • GIRAFFE_ID
  • MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID

MONKEY_PUZZLES

  • MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID
  • GIRAFFE_ID

MONKEY_PUZZLES.GIRAFFE_ID and MONKEYS.GIRAFFE_ID match, but there are n MONKEYS per MONKEY_PUZZLE (so MONKEY_PUZZLES.GIRAFFE_ID 1 might match to MONKEY.MONKEY_ID 1, 2 and 334).

I want to set the MONKEYS.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID field, based on the MONKEY_PUZZLES.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID field, because currently my MONKEYS.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID field is null. I have indexes on:

  • MONKEYS.MONKEY_ID (primary key with index)
  • MONKEYS.GIRAFFE_ID
  • MONKEY_PUZZLES.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID (primary key with index)
  • MONKEY_PUZZLES.GIRAFFE_ID

I also have over 1.6 million rows in the MONKEYS table and over 50,000 rows in the MONKEY_PUZZLES table.

I was originally using the following query:

UPDATE MONKEYS M SET M.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID = 
  (SELECT MP.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID FROM MONKEY_PUZZLES MP 
   WHERE M.GIRAFFE_ID = MP.GIRAFFE_ID 
   AND MP.GIRAFFE_ID IS NOT NULL);

However, this script would take about 2 minutes to get from 0% to 92.67% complete, then it took well over 25 minutes to get to 94% complete. I eventually stopped the script. I ran it a few times (I was playing about with different indexes and DBMS_STATS), but each time it would get to 92.67% and crap out.

So I thought it must be my script. I went back to square one, ate a banana, said "Oook" a lot and came up with the following variation script, which is much more explicit:

UPDATE MONKEYS M2 SET M2.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID = 
  (SELECT X.MPID FROM 
    (SELECT M.MONKEY_ID MID, MP.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID MPID 
     FROM MONKEYS M INNER JOIN MONKEY_PUZZLES MP 
     ON MP.GIRAFFE_ID = M.GIRAFFE_ID) X 
  WHERE X.MID = M2.MONKEY_ID);

However, it was rubbish. Even with my indexes, it took well over 5 minutes just to get to 2%, so I scrapped that one.

I then came up with the following variation, which I was pretty pleased with:

UPDATE MONKEYS M SET M.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID = 
  (SELECT MP.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID 
   FROM MONKEY_PUZZLES MP 
   WHERE M.GIRAFFE_ID = MP.GIRAFFE_ID 
   AND EXISTS 
     (SELECT 1 FROM MONKEY_PUZZLES MP2 
      WHERE M.GIRAFFE_ID = MP2.GIRAFFE_ID));

However, and I really couldn't believe my eyes, this script behaved almost exactly like the first; running in about 2 minutes, from 0% up to 92.67% complete, then taking absolutely ages to get any further. What is it with 92.67%?!

The total number of blocks is 41,717, so it gets to about 38,000 blocks before it seems to significantly slow down.

In case you're wondering, I'm using the following query on a separate SQLPlus session to calculate the %age complete:

SELECT X.*, TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, 'HH24:MI:SS') TIMESTAMP 
  FROM (select sid, serial#, opname, sofar, totalwork, 
    round(sofar/totalwork*100,2) "% Complete" from v$session_longops) X 
  WHERE "% Complete" < 100 and totalwork > 0;

(which is a variation of this: http://searchoracle.techtarget.com/tip/Tracking-the-progress-of-long-running-queries)

Please help put a poor tiger out of his misery!

P.S. I'm going to leave the script running overnight and I'll update in the morning if it reaches 100%.

EDIT: It reached 100% eventually after only 57minutes (so not all that bad), but considering it reached 92.67% in 2 minutes, it's pretty terrible!

share|improve this question
    
You should do a couple of things: create optimizer statistics for your tables and get the execution plan for the corresponding statements. In addition you should check what the wait events are when the query is stuck. – steve Sep 5 '11 at 18:33
    
Execution plans would really help here. Also, are all your monkeys.monkey_puzzle_id fields NULL, or would adding a WHERE monkey_puzzle_id IS NULL maybe help? – eaolson Sep 6 '11 at 2:27
    
Thanks @eaolson. All my monkeys.monkey_puzzle_ids are null. @steve, I've used DBMS_STATS.GENERATE_SCHEMA_STATS(OWNNAME=>'JUNGLE',OPTIONS=>'GATHER AUTO') to generate statistics on the indexes I've set up. Is there something else that can help? – LordScree Sep 6 '11 at 8:00
1  
I got a real kick out of your disguised table names. – HLGEM Sep 6 '11 at 13:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have no explanation for the specific symptoms you're seeing -- possibly the execution plan for the update would help explain it -- but in any case I would expect this to perform better:

MERGE INTO monkeys m
USING monkey_puzzles mp
ON (mp.giraffe_id = m.giraffe_id)
WHEN MATCHED THEN UPDATE SET m.monkey_puzzle_id = mp.monkey_puzzle_id
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @DaveCosta, thanks I will definitely give this a go. I'm ashamed to admit I haven't used MERGE before. Just out of interest, what's the way to get the execution plan in SQLPlus? I don't have access to a GUI. I am very interested to hear the explanation for the specific problem, so I can hopefully avoid it in the future. Thanks – LordScree Sep 6 '11 at 8:11
    
this was excellent. 17.31 seconds!! I didn't even have time to check progress, it was too quick! I'm definitely going to consider MERGE in future. Thanks again. – LordScree Sep 6 '11 at 8:38
2  
@LordScree -- one way to view the execution plan is EXPLAIN PLAN (download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14211/…). If possible, it is better to use DBMS_XPLAN.DISPLAY_CURSOR (download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/appdev.102/b14258/…). – Dave Costa Sep 6 '11 at 13:20

If you're having problems with something like this then the simplest thing to do is ignore it completely. NB Doesn't solve the reason for the problem! For this query, and yours, you should really have an index on giraffe_id in monkey_puzzles; Giraffe_id, monkey_puzzle_id would be even better.

declare

  i number(10) := 0;

begin

  for xx in ( select rowid as rid, giraffe_id
                from monkeys ) loop

     UPDATE MONKEYS M 
        SET M.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID = ( SELECT MP.MONKEY_PUZZLE_ID 
                                     FROM MONKEY_PUZZLES MP 
                                    WHERE MP.GIRAFFE_ID = xx.giraffe_id )
      WHERE rowid = xx.rid
            ;

     i := i + 1;
     if mod(i,1000) = 0 then
       commit;
       -- and some show-boating from memory (if you're using PL\SQL)
       dbms_application_info.set_module('Updating Monkeys', 'Total: ' || i );
     end if;

   end loop;
   commit;

end;
/
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ben for your reply. I must admit, I have used your mantra on too many occasions! I'm afraid I tried your looping script, but it was considerably slower (<2% after 5 minutes). No doubt it would have got past the 92.67% though, as it's only doing a certain number of rows each time. The other downside of this approach is that it's committing as it goes, so it's not possible to roll it back if it goes wrong. Thanks again though. – LordScree Sep 6 '11 at 8:36
    
I hope it's not my mantra @LordScree! – Ben Sep 6 '11 at 12:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.