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I have seen a few similar questions but I am trying to achieve this.

Given a string, str="The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!" I want to extract the words and store them in an array. The expected array elements would be this.

the 
moon 
is 
our 
natural 
satellite 
i.e. 
it  
rotates 
around 
the 
earth

I tried using String.split( ','\t','\r') but this does not work correctly. I also tried removing the ., and other punctuation marks but I would want a string like "i.e." to be parsed out too. What is the best way to achieve this? I also tried using regex.split to no avail.

string[] words = Regex.Split(line, @"\W+");

Would surely appreciate some nudges in the right direction.

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The second . in i.e. and a punctuation . are indistinguishable unless you add a list of words that are known to end in .. –  CodesInChaos Sep 5 '11 at 18:58
6  
I note that the moon rotates around its own axis. It revolves around the earth. –  Eric Lippert Sep 6 '11 at 0:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A regex solution.

(\b[^\s]+\b)

And if you really want to fix that last . on i.e. you could use this.

((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?)

Here's the code I'm using.

  var input = "The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!";
  var matches = Regex.Matches(input, @"((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?)");

  foreach(var match in matches)
  {
     Console.WriteLine(match);
  }

Results:

The
moon
is
our
natural
satellite
i.e.
it
rotates
around
the
Earth
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But isn't that going to include punctuation as part of the word? So in the example above the last word would be "Earth!" ... –  Jim Mischel Sep 5 '11 at 19:06
    
No it won't match the punctuation in earth. \b matches on word boundaries. –  TheCodeKing Sep 5 '11 at 19:16
    
@Thecodeking, What about matching "i.e."? or something like "u.n.i.c.e.f"? –  Richard N Sep 5 '11 at 20:47
    
Comes out as u.n.i.c.e.f or i.e :) –  TheCodeKing Sep 5 '11 at 21:00
1  
No just updated with my code. –  TheCodeKing Sep 6 '11 at 22:49

I suspect the solution you're looking for is much more complex than you think. You're looking for some form of actual language analysis, or at a minimum a dictionary, so that you can determine whether a period is part of a word or ends a sentence. Have you considered the fact that it may do both?

Consider adding a dictionary of allowed "words that contain punctuation." This may be the simplest way to solve your problem.

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Regex does this with \b so you don't have to, admittedly there are some grey areas. For instance i.e. with match as i.e. –  TheCodeKing Sep 5 '11 at 19:23

This works for me.

var str="The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!";
var a = str.Split(new char[] {' ', '\t'});
for (int i=0; i < a.Length; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(" -{0}", a[i]);
}

Results:

 -The
 -moon
 -is
 -our
 -natural
 -satellite,
 -i.e.
 -it
 -rotates
 -around
 -the
 -Earth!

you could do some post-processing of the results, removing commas and semicolons, etc.

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Would this be the best solution. Would post processing be considered inefficient for cases like these? –  Richard N Sep 7 '11 at 21:48
Regex.Matches(input, @"\b\w+\b").OfType<Match>().Select(m => m.Value)
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