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I've been trying to erase an element from an array without changing the index order, for instance:

class MyObject  
{  
    int id;  
public:  
    MyObject() { }  
    void setId( int i ) { id = i; }  
    void showId() { std::cout << "ID: "<< id << "\n"; }
};  
MyObject *myArray;

int main ( )  
{  
    myArray = new myArray[6];  
    for( int i = 0; i < 6; i++ )  
    {  
        myArray[i]->setId(i); 
        myArray[i]->showId();
    }  
}  

I want to remove myArray[3] without changing the index of the others. e.g:

myArray[0] = ID: 1  
myArray[1] = ID: 2  
myArray[2] = nothing  
myArray[3] = ID: 4  
myArray[4] = ID: 5  
myArray[5] = ID: 6    

I've tried to use use memset(), but it didn't work.

memset(&myArray[3],0,sizeof(MyObject));
share|improve this question
    
What is the end goal of this? That seems like a bit of an anti-pattern. Perhaps there's a better way of accomplishing whatever the end goal is. –  Corbin Sep 5 '11 at 19:01
1  
Off-topic, but remember that array indexes start from zero. myArray[6] is out of bounds. –  Mike Seymour Sep 5 '11 at 19:09
    
@Mike Possibly not off-topic since all we know of the failure mode is "it didn't work". –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '11 at 19:11
1  
This is C++, so don't use arrays in the first place - use std::vector<MyObject*> instead. If you need to be able to efficiently remove elements in the middle and have existing references (iterators) stay valid, use a std::list<MyObject*>. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 5 '11 at 19:12
1  
Based on the question and the comments, I'd suggest looking into moving to an unordered (hash based) map unless you have a specific reason for needing a vector (typically, this would be a requirement that the memory be contiguous). boost::unordered_map would be a good place to start. –  Chad Sep 5 '11 at 20:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are calling memset to write a bunch of zeros over the top of an object instance. Do not do this! You may get away with it if your class is a true POD class. You might end up just setting the ID to 0. But maybe there is more to your class that you aren't showing. In anycase, even if it isn't POD, don't use memset like that.

You can either store pointers to object and use the null pointer to indicate there is nothing there. I'd do this with std::vector<MyObject*>. Or you use a sentinel object instance, for example with ID of -1.

The other thing that could be a problem is that you appear to be using 1-based indices. C++ arrays are 0-based, so the first element is myArray[0] and not myArray[1].

share|improve this answer
    
I think by "without changing the index order" he's wanting the id of the object to correspond to the index it's in. Could be wrong though. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 5 '11 at 19:09
    
@Seth You could be right. I think the use of 1-based indices is likely to be a bigger problem. –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '11 at 19:12
    
Sorry about the mistype in the main post >< I'm using 0-based indices, but as I said in my last comment: the problem with std::vector is that it keeps changing the indexes and they are the IDs of the objects. –  k3oy Sep 5 '11 at 19:20
1  
The main issue is that you didn't say what your problem was and we all had to guess. Use pointers if you want a null value as both Seth and I say. –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '11 at 19:22

There's no such thing as "nothing" in C++ language. Once you have an array, all elements of that array will contain "something". There's no way to make an array element just disappear with keeping all other elements in their original places. You can't create a hole in the array.

All you can do in this case is simply label some element as "deleted" and then later recognize it as such. The element will, of course, continue to exist physically. It is you who'll have to recognize it as "deleted" and ignore it in your further processing. You can either add some bool is_deleted field to your object, or you can use some reserved value of id (like -1) to indicate a deleted element.

In your example with memset you essentially set the id to zero. Is 0 a valid id value? If it is not, then 0 is a good choice to mark a deleted element. In that sense your memset attempt works perfectly fine, as it should. Although I'd recommend doing it by explicitly assigning zero to id, without using memset.

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Using memset that way is setting all the bytes of that object to 0. This is usually equivalent to setting id to 0, because the memory of an object is the memory of its members (not counting vtables, padding, etc). But don't do that anyway.

One way to do this is to use new and have an array of pointers.

MyObject* myArray[6];

int main ( )  
{ 
    for( int i = 0; i < 6; i++ )  
    {
        myArray[i] = new MyObject;
        myArray[i]->setId(i); 
        myArray[i]->showId();
    }  
}

Then to display them all:

for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    cout << "myArray[" << i << "] = ";
    if (myArray[i])
        myArray[i]->showId();
    else
        cout << "nothing" << endl;
}

Then when you want to remove an object, delete it and set its pointer to NULL:

delete myArray
myArray[3] = NULL;

Then when you do anything with one of the objects in myArray, you must check if it is NULL to see if it's a valid object.

share|improve this answer
    
But how could I do that with a dynamic array? –  k3oy Sep 5 '11 at 19:26
    
@k3oy change MyObject* myArray[6] to MyObject** myArray = new MyObject*[6]; –  Seth Carnegie Sep 5 '11 at 19:27

Consider boost::optional:

typedef boost::optional<MyObject> MyObjectOpt;
MyObjectOptArr *myArray;

The syntax/usage is a bit different (resembles using pointer):

for (int i = 0; i < 6; ++i) {      
    if (myArray[i])
        cout << "myArray[" << i << "] = " << *(myArray[N]);
    else
        cout << "nothing" << endl;
}

To unset value do:

myArray[N] = boost::none;
share|improve this answer
    
So, when I remove any value from myArray the others would still be at the same index? –  k3oy Sep 5 '11 at 19:24
    
To remove an index assign boost:none - i'll update the answer –  dimba Sep 5 '11 at 19:26

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