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[Preface: The associative C++ containers like std::map are a bit like micro-databases with just one key column. Boost's bimap elevates this to a two-column table with lookup in both columns, but that that's as far as the analogy goes -- there's no "polymap" that generalizes the idea.]

In any event, I want to keep thinking of maps as databases, and I now wonder if there is an iterator (or some other solution) that allows me to do a UNION of several constituent maps. That is, all maps have the same type (or value type and comparator, at least), and I want a single iterator that treats the entire collection as a big multimap (repeated keys are OK) and lets me traverse it in the correct unioned order.

Does such a thing exist, perhaps within Boost? Or is it easy to rig one up? In pseudo code:

std::map<K, M> m1, m2;
union_iterator<K, M> u(m1, m2)
for(auto it = u.begin(); it != u.end(); ++it) { /* ... */ }

For example, if we had:

m1 = { { 9:00, "Check in"}, { 12:00, "Break" }, { 16:00, "Check out"} };
m2 = { { 10:30, "coffee" }, { 12:15, "baked beans" }, { 15:00, "lies" } };

then I want the iterator to produce:

9:00, "Check in"; 10:30, "coffee"; 12:00, "Break"; 12:15, "baked beans"; ...
share|improve this question
    
I think you need exactly the same type of map for implementing such an iterator, since it would have to dereference to a std::pair <key, value> anyway. –  Nicolas Grebille Sep 5 '11 at 22:29
    
@Nicolas: I'd probably be OK if the containers had different allocators, at least if the UNION iterator were read-only... Of course the value type (recall that the value type is the pair, I didn't say "mapped type") and the comparator have to agree. –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '11 at 22:41
    
Sorry, I misread "value type and comparator" as "key type and comparator", I thought you intended same key and different value types... EDIT: OK! I think as a map as "key/value pair", so I misunderstood. My mistake. –  Nicolas Grebille Sep 5 '11 at 22:46
    
Note that either the iterator's ++ operator, or an equivalent amount of pre-processing per element, must be O(log n), n being "several" (the number of maps). Otherwise you could use it to perform a sort in less than O(n log n). Rigging one up would in effect be to perform an n-way merge, which is easy for n=2 as in the example and a bit fiddly otherwise. –  Steve Jessop Sep 5 '11 at 23:04
2  
Instead of multiple maps (one for each "category" of data), could you have one big map with an extra "category" column? If so, then you could use boost::multi_index which should allow you to iterate over the whole set of data. –  Emile Cormier Sep 6 '11 at 6:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

As I announced, I have got something pretty cool.

I'm posting it now, because I wouldn't be sure whether I'd be back in time tonight to post it. I will be spending a few words in explanation. (in this post)

PS. The includes will be trimmed down (to about 20%); I will probably do some more general work on the code too.

A lot can be said about this code: it is not very efficient, and not very clean (yet). It is, however, nearly infinitely generic and should scale like anything else. All code can be found in a github gist:

  • merge_maps_iterator.hpp
  • Makefile
  • test.cpp - a rather arcane set of test-cases showing off the genericity
    (I'm not saying that it would be a good idea to have maps keyed with ints and floats (let alone both at the same time) - just showing that it can be done)

Here is the output of the test.cpp as you can find it:

 == input ========================================
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
{ b, 3.14 }     
 == output =======================================
     2: aap;
    23: mies;
    98: 3.14;
   100: noot;
   101: broer;

 == input ========================================
{ b, 3.14 }     
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
 == output =======================================
     2: aap;
    23: mies;
    98: 3.14;
   100: noot;
   101: broer;

 == input ========================================
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
 == output =======================================
     2: aap;aap;
    23: mies;mies;
   100: noot;noot;
   101: broer;broer;

 == input ========================================
{ b, 3.14 }     
{ b, 3.14 }     
 == output =======================================
     b: 3.14;3.14;

 == input ========================================
{ 1.0, dag }    { 22.0, bye }   { 24.0, Tschüß }
{ 1, true }     { 22, false }   { 24, true }    
{ b, 3.14 }     
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
 == output =======================================
   1.0: dag;true;
   2.0: aap;
  22.0: bye;false;
  23.0: mies;
  24.0: Tschüß;true;
  98.0: 3.14;
 100.0: noot;
 101.0: broer;

 == input ========================================
{ 1.0, dag }    { 2.0, EXTRA }  { 22.0, bye }   { 24.0, Tschüß }
{ 1, true }     { 22, false }   { 24, true }    
{ b, 3.14 }     
{ 2, aap }      { 23, mies }    { 100, noot }   { 101, broer }  
 == output =======================================
   1.0: dag;true;
   2.0: EXTRA;aap;
  22.0: bye;false;
  23.0: mies;
  24.0: Tschüß;true;
  98.0: 3.14;
 100.0: noot;
 101.0: broer;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you - I'll have to look at that in detail, but it looks very promising! What's the ordering criterion for the mapped type when the key is the same? –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 17:38
    
@KerrekSB: sry can't make the post tonight, I feel like I've been hit by a bus (I swear it wasn't just the C++ :)) I'll post the backgroun/explanation tomorrow. Thanks for the accept/bounty. Much appreciated! –  sehe Sep 22 '11 at 22:57
    
No worries. I won't have time to look at this till next week anyway. (I am trying to bounty off my unaccepted questions, though :-).) –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 23:01
    
This is indeed pretty cool! After precompiling all the headers (takes about 1 minute), this becomes actually usable :-) Say, is there a way to get around boost::fusion::tie and instead just have std::tuple and std::tie? Also, is there a way to print the mapped values of the iterator without karma? –  Kerrek SB Nov 25 '11 at 17:27
    
@KerrekSB First off, I just noticed that the link in my answer was to an old revision of the gist... oops. I don't remember what I changed but it's seen 4 revision since the linked one (hope you saw that) –  sehe Nov 25 '11 at 17:30

There is a "polymap": Boost.MultiIndex.

share|improve this answer
2  
I was always under the impression that multiindex just gives you different views on the first column, i.e. the key. Am I mistaken? Can you make a proper database as a multiindex? –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '11 at 22:18
    
Multiple sort orders on one "column" is just one use-case. MultiIndex supports indexing on arbitrary expressions (in fact the notion of "column" doesn't really exist, only the notion of defining keys wrt elements). Check out the bimap example, for instance, which indexes on both columns of a pair. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 5 '11 at 22:22
    
I see - so you could have a multi-index on a multiset of tuples, each element being one table row, and the index providing access to various columns? –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '11 at 22:24
    
You can have a multi_index on the tuple type itself (AFAIK, it owns its contents) and define keys wrt elements of the tuple or even multiple elements in a single key via a user-defined key extractor. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 5 '11 at 22:28
    
Thanks, that's really good to know! It isn't the answer to my main question, but +1 in any case! –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '11 at 22:43

Either copying both mapS into a temporary, appending one to the other (in case you can modify them) or using a vector as a temporary with std::set_union and a custom comparator are the easiest alternative solutions.

share|improve this answer

Here's how I would implement thiton's answer:

template <class container> class union_iterator
{
private:
    typedef std::pair<typename container::const_iterator, typename container::const_iterator> container_range;
    class container_range_compare
    {
    public:
        bool operator()(const container_range &lhs, const container_range &rhs) const
        {
            return typename container::value_compare()(*lhs.first, *rhs.first);
        }
    };

    std::priority_queue<container_range, container_range_compare> m_range_queue;
    container::const_iterator m_current_iterator;
    bool m_is_valid;

    void add_container(const container &cont)
    {
        add_container_range(std::make_pair(cont.begin(), cont.end()));
    }

    void add_container_range(const container_range &range)
    {
        if (range.first!=range.second)
        {
            m_range_queue.push(range);
        }
    }

public:
    union_iterator(const container &a): m_valid(false)
    {
        add_container(a);
    }

    bool next()
    {
        m_is_valid= false;

        if (!m_range_queue.empty())
        {
            container_range range= m_range_queue.pop();
            m_current_iterator= range.first;

            ++range.first;
            add_container_range(range);

            m_is_valid= true;
        }

        return m_is_valid;
    }

    typename const container::value_type &operator *() const
    {
        return *m_current_iterator;
    }

    typename const container::value_type *operator ->() const
    {
        return m_current_iterator.operator ->();
    }
};

It has slightly different usage than union_iterator<K, V> but it implements the basic idea. You can expand the constructor to accept multiple maps however you fit, and use it in a while (iterator.next()) loop instead of a for (...) loop.

EDIT: I simplified next() by doing all the popping and pushing at once. So now it's even simpler! (One could also expend some effort making it like a STL iterator, but that gets tedious.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I like it!! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 22 '11 at 13:09
    
I haven't read this one in detail yet (but I might add another bounty, if you wish), but does this take advantage of the fact that the component maps are already sorted? –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 17:36
    
Yes; in fact, it wouldn't work they weren't already sorted :) –  MSN Sep 22 '11 at 20:50
    
OK, I'll add another +50 bounty (when I next get 250+ rep) - nobody should go without some bounty :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 23:03

Very simple solution using boost function_output_iterator:

typedef std::map< std::string, std::string > Map;
Map first_map, second_map;
... // fill maps
// iterate over maps union
std::merge(
            first_map.begin(), first_map.end(),
            second_map.begin(), second_map.end(),
            boost::make_function_output_iterator(
                []( const Map::value_type & pair )
                {
                    std::cout << 
                    "key = " << pair.first << 
                    "; value = " << pair.second << std::endl;
                }       
            ),
            first_map.value_comp()
    );

We can make this solution prettier by using boost::set_union (range version) instead of std::set_union.

UPD Updated version use different key/values types:

typedef std::map< int, char > FirstMap;
typedef std::map< short, std::string > SecondMap;
FirstMap        first_map;
SecondMap       second_map;

... // fill maps

struct CustomOutput
{
    void operator()( const FirstMap::value_type & pair ) const
    {
        std::cout << "key = " << pair.first <<
        "; value = " << pair.second << std::endl;
    }

    void operator()( const SecondMap::value_type & pair ) const
    {
        std::cout << "key = " << pair.first <<
        "; value = " << pair.second << std::endl;
    }
};

struct CustomPred
{
    bool operator()( const FirstMap::value_type & first_pair, const SecondMap::value_type & second_pair ) const
    { return first_pair.first < second_pair.first; }

    bool operator()( const SecondMap::value_type & second_pair, const FirstMap::value_type & first_pair ) const
    { return second_pair.first < first_pair.first; }
};

// iterate over maps union
std::merge(
            first_map.begin(), first_map.end(),
            second_map.begin(), second_map.end(),
            boost::make_function_output_iterator( CustomOutput() ),
            CustomPred()
    );

UPD2 std::set_union replaced with std::merge

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. That's simple. Mainly because it doesn't do what the OP asked. This just does a union of two maps. The OP specifically deals with maps that map the same key type to distinct value types. The end result can never be the original map type. I.e. 'merge'(map<K,V1>, map<K,V2>) -> map<K, tuple<optional<V1>, optional<V2>). (My answer even allows for inhomogenous (but comparable) key types, and allows the caller to decide how to represent the valuetype.) –  sehe Nov 28 '12 at 10:21
    
Sorry, I just read the original question. But this solution can be easly modified for different key/values types support. I'll update my answer. –  Maxim Ky Nov 28 '12 at 14:57
1  
Most interesting... This looks way more versatile than I had anticipated. Hmmm. I'll give it whirl after dinner (my gut says the CustomPred ought to have 4 overloads, or a templated operator<?) –  sehe Nov 28 '12 at 16:44
    
Ok, so as long as keys don't overlap you get some mileage here: ideone.com/RBqEnb# (I've added the output in the "input" section, as it won't actually run on ideone). Sadly, the overlapping of keys was precisely the use case here (to match up corresponding entries in different maps). –  sehe Nov 28 '12 at 18:06
    
Pretty soon when you want to generalize this to work for any map and combine matching elements in tuple<optional<V1>, optional<V2>> you'd end up with pretty much what I posted. Anyways, it looks like, for the 2-map situation only, I could have employed std::set_union to my benefit. Thanks for showing me this - +1 stands –  sehe Nov 28 '12 at 18:07

Or is it easy to rig one up?

Rigging up should be fairly easy: For N base maps, your iterator contains a priority queue prioritized by the N keys of the elements the base iterators point to. For dereference, dereference the iterator at the queue front. For increment, increment the iterator at the queue front and, if it's increment is not at the end, re-insert it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, I have to think about this. I can't quite see it, but I might just not be awake enough at this point. Thanks! –  Kerrek SB Sep 16 '11 at 23:24
1  
There is nothing very special to understand, it is basically just a merger of sorted sequences using priority queues. –  thiton Sep 18 '11 at 0:55

Here's how it can be done quite easily:

template<class It>
class union_iterator
{
public:
  union_iterator(It it1_begin, It it1_end, It it2_begin, It it2_end)
     : current1(it1_begin), current2(it2_begin), end1(it1_end), end2(it2_end)
     { if (it1_begin != it1_end && it2_begin != it2_end) {
         if (*it1_begin < *it2_begin) { current= &current1; }
         else { current = &current2; }
       } else if (it1_begin==it1_end) { current=&current2; }
       else { current = &current1; }
     }
  void operator++() { 
    if (current1!=end1 && current2 !=end2) { 
       if (*current1 < *current2) 
         { ++current1; current = &current1; } 
         else { ++current2; current=&current2; } 
    } else if (current1==end1 && current2 != end2) {
       ++current2;
       current = &current2;
    } else if (current1!=end1 && current2 == end2) {
       ++current1;
       current = &current1;
    }
  }
  typename std::iterator<It1>::value_type operator*() { return **current; }
private:
  It current1;
  It current2;
  It end1;
  It end2;
  It *current;
};

But the real problem is implementing all the remaining member functions required by normal iterators :-). Boost has some lib for helping you do it, but it might still be quite difficult.

share|improve this answer
2  
I would be happier if: T wasn't a template (figured out from std::iterator<It>::value_type), the iterators were in a vector/array, and you didn't assume they were map iterators (use *current1 < *current2 instead of comparing the ->first directly. You also check if current1==end1 many times, which can be avoided via more nested ifs. You also use current1++ when ++current1 may be faster. Actually, I think you got the only hard operator other than operator< (which probably can't be done). That all sounds critical, but this answer is what I'd do. –  Mooing Duck Sep 16 '11 at 22:27
    
If you don't access ->first, then this could also be used on sorted std::vector`s –  Mooing Duck Sep 16 '11 at 22:30
    
unfortunately I think the ->first is necessary because map iterators return pairs. it might need separate version anyway for map and vector -- it really need to choose the first element of the pair for map case. –  tp1 Sep 16 '11 at 23:12
    
cplusplus.com/reference/std/utility/pair In inequality comparisons (<, >), the first elements are compared first, and only if the inequality comparison is not true for them, the second elements are compared. Magic! –  Mooing Duck Sep 16 '11 at 23:17
    
oh, that's nice. I didn't know about that. :) I'll edit the answer. –  tp1 Sep 16 '11 at 23:18

This isn't an iterator like you asked for, but I just found this function in the standard library:

§ 25.4.5.2 set_union [set.union]

 template<class InputIterator1, class InputIterator2,
 class OutputIterator, class Compare>
 OutputIterator
 set_union(InputIterator1 first1, InputIterator1 last1,
 InputIterator2 first2, InputIterator2 last2,
 OutputIterator result, Compare comp);
  1. Effects: Constructs a sorted intersection of the elements from the two ranges; that is, the set of elements that are present in both of the ranges.
  2. Requires: The resulting range shall not overlap with either of the original ranges.
  3. Returns: The end of the constructed range.
  4. Complexity: At most 2 * ((last1 - first1) + (last2 - first2)) - 1 comparisons.
  5. Remarks: If [first1,last1) contains m elements that are equivalent to each other and [first2, last2) contains n elements that are equivalent to them, the first min(m, n) elements shall be copied from the first range to the output range, in order.

There's also a std::set_intersection, std::set_difference, and std::set_symmetric_difference

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