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What is the instanceof operator used for? I've seen stuff like

if (source instanceof Button) {
    //...
} else {
    //...
}

But none of it made sense to me. I've done my research, but came up only with examples without any explanations.

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13  
There is nothing wrong with asking questions here, but if you are learning Java you might want to get a book. Any decent Java book would have the answer to this question and the next 1000 you're going to have. –  GregS Sep 5 '11 at 23:32
    
Such an operator has many specific uses. This would be a specific question if it asked for an explanation of one of the examples that did not make sense to you. –  Raedwald Aug 23 '13 at 7:15
    
The answers below are correct, however note that instanceof is an overused operator 9 times out of 10 it can be replaced by a proper use of polymorphism (not always, but often) –  Richard Tingle Aug 24 '13 at 18:22
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9 Answers

instanceof keyword is a binary operator used to test if an object (instance) is a subtype of a given Type.

Imagine:

interface Domestic {}
class Animal {}
class Dog extends Animal implements Domestic {}
class Cat extends Animal implements Domestic {}

Imagine a dog object, created with Object dog = new Dog(), then:

dog instanceof Domestic // true - Dog implements Domestic
dog instanceof Animal   // true - Dog extends Animal
dog instanceof Dog      // true - Dog is Dog
dog instanceof Object   // true - Object is the parent type of all objects

However,

animal instanceof Dog // false

because Animal is a supertype of Dog and possibly less "refined".

And,

dog instanceof Cat // does not even compile!

This is because Dog is neither a subtype nor a supertype of Cat, and it also does not implement it.

Note that the variable used for dog above is of type Object. This is to show instanceof is a runtime operation and brings us to a/the use case: to react differently based upon an objects type at runtime.

Things to note: expressionThatIsNull instanceof T is false for all Types T.

Happy coding.

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+1 "Dog is Dog" –  Phil H May 8 at 15:32
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It's an operator that returns true if the left side of the expression is an instance of the class name on the right side.

Think about it this way. Say all the houses on your block were built from the same blueprints. Ten houses (objects), one set of blueprints (class definition).

instanceof is a useful tool when you've got a collection of objects and you're not sure what they are. Let's say you've got a collection of controls on a form. You want to read the checked state of whatever checkboxes are there, but you can't ask a plain old object for its checked state. Instead, you'd see if each object is a checkbox, and if it is, cast it to a checkbox and check its properties.

if (obj instanceof Checkbox)
{
    Checkbox cb = (Checkbox)obj;
    boolean state = cb.getState();
}
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5  
That is to say, using instanceof can make it safe to downcast. –  Raedwald Aug 23 '13 at 7:11
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If source is an object variable, instanceof is a way of checking to see if it is a Button or not.

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As described on this site:

The instanceof operator can be used to test if an object is of a specific type...

if (objectReference instanceof type)

A quick example:

String s = "Hello World!"
if (s instanceof String) {
    return true;
} else {
    return false;
}
//result --> true

However, applying instanceof on a null reference variable/expression returns false.

String s = null;
if (s instanceof String) {
    return true;
} else {
    return false;
}
//result --> false

Since a subclass is a 'type' of its superclass, you can use the instanceof to verify this...

class Parent {
    public Parent() {}
}

class Child extends Parent {
    public Child() {
        super();
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Child child = new Child();
        if (child instanceof Parent) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
//result --> true

I hope this helps!

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This operator allows you to determine the type of an object. It will returns a boolean value.

For example

package test;<br>

import java.util.Date;<br>
import java.util.Map;<br>
import java.util.HashMap;<br>

public class instanceoftest<br>
{
   public static void main(String ar[])
   {
      Map m=new HashMap();<br>
      System.out.println("Returns a boolean value "+(m instanceof Map));<br>
      System.out.println("Returns a boolean value "+(m instanceof HashMap));<br>
      System.out.println("Returns a boolean value "+(m instanceof Object));<br>
      System.out.println("Returns a boolean value "+(m instanceof Date));<br>
   }
} 

then the output is
Returns a boolean value true
Returns a boolean value true
Returns a boolean value true
Returns a boolean value false

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Very simple code example:

If (object1 instanceof Class1) {
   // do something
} else if (object1 instanceof Class2) {
   // do something different
}

Be careful here. In the example above, if Class1 is Object, the first comparison will always be true. So, just like with exceptions, hierarchical order matters!

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The instanceof operator compares an object to a specified type. You can use it to test if an object is an instance of a class, an instance of a subclass, or an instance of a class that implements a particular interface.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/op2.html

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Finding Out of what Class an Object is Instantiated

Object testObject = new Vector();
    if (testObject instanceof Vector)
      System.out.println("Object was an instance of the class java.util.Vector");
    else if (testObject instanceof ArrayList)
      System.out.println("Object was an instance of the class java.util.ArrayList");
    else
      System.out.println("Object was an instance of the " + testObject.getClass());

Object was an instance of the class java.util.Vector

instanceof operator and class hierarchy

class A {
  int i, j;
}

class B {
  int i, j;
}

class C extends A {
  int k;
}

class D extends A {
  int k;
}

class InstanceOf {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();
    C c = new C();
    D d = new D();

    if (a instanceof A)
      System.out.println("a is instance of A");
    if (b instanceof B)
      System.out.println("b is instance of B");
    if (c instanceof C)
      System.out.println("c is instance of C");
    if (c instanceof A)
      System.out.println("c can be cast to A");

    if (a instanceof C)
      System.out.println("a can be cast to C");

    System.out.println();

    A ob;

    ob = d; // A reference to d
    System.out.println("ob now refers to d");
    if (ob instanceof D)
      System.out.println("ob is instance of D");

    System.out.println();

    ob = c; // A reference to c
    System.out.println("ob now refers to c");

    if (ob instanceof D)
      System.out.println("ob can be cast to D");
    else
      System.out.println("ob cannot be cast to D");

    if (ob instanceof A)
      System.out.println("ob can be cast to A");

    System.out.println();

    // all objects can be cast to Object
    if (a instanceof Object)
      System.out.println("a may be cast to Object");
    if (b instanceof Object)
      System.out.println("b may be cast to Object");
    if (c instanceof Object)
      System.out.println("c may be cast to Object");
    if (d instanceof Object)
      System.out.println("d may be cast to Object");
  }
}

source

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As mentioned in other answers, the canonical typical usage of instanceof is for checking if an identifier is referring to a more specific type. Example:

Object someobject = ... some code which gets something that might be a button ...
if (someobject instanceof Button) {
    // then if someobject is in fact a button this block gets executed
} else {
    // otherwise execute this block
}

Note however, that the type of the left-hand expression must be a parent type of the right hand expression (see JLS 15.20.2 and Java Puzzlers, #50, pp114). For example, the following will fail to compile:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args) {
        System.out.println(new Test() instanceof String); // will fail to compile
    }
}

This fails to compile with the message:

Test.java:6: error: inconvertible types
        System.out.println(t instanceof String);
                       ^
  required: String
  found:    Test
1 error

As Test is not a parent class of String. OTOH, this compiles perfectly and prints false as expected:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args) {
        Object t = new Test();
        // compiles fine since Object is a parent class to String
        System.out.println(t instanceof String); 
    }
}
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