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If this were a regular array, I could just create a new array and then do arraycopy, but generics won't let me do that. The best thing I've come up with so far is:

public void resize() {
    T[] tempArray = Arrays.copyOf(myArray,myArray.length*3);

It compiles, but at run time, I get a null pointer exception. Can anyone explain what I'm doing wrong?

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Any reason java.util.ArrayList doesn't work for you? It kind of handles all this and more, no need to reinvent the wheel. – corsiKa Sep 5 '11 at 23:46
If you are resizing arrays, you probably want a generic ArrayList. – Cheeso Sep 5 '11 at 23:49
I'm familiar with Arrays and ArrayLists, but I'm just trying to learn about generics. Thanks for the suggestion (In practice, ArrayList is what I would probably use). – MatthewK Sep 5 '11 at 23:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

you can use Arrays.copyOf(myArray,myArray.length*3) to make the copy

my guess is that myArray[0] is null so myArray[0].getClass() throws the nullpointer

if you need the runtime type of the components you can use myArray.getClass().getComponentType()

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Two things:

  1. If you're getting a null pointer on the first line of resize() it's probably because you have no value in myArray[0]. If that is null, your getClass() will bomb.

  2. You don't appear to be assigning myArray = tempArray so you'll probably run into an ArrayIndexOutOfBounds soon.

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That was it, I tried manually adding some stuff to the array and that fixed it, so the problem is elsewhere. And good catch on #2, sorry I forgot to paste that into the question. – MatthewK Sep 5 '11 at 23:55

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