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I have this piece of code:

// Returns the fibonacci range until the specified limit
int fibo(int** output, int limit)
{
    // Must be 1 or more
    if(limit < 1) return 0;

    int* range = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int) * limit);
    assert(range);

    int i;

    // Calculate the range
    for(i = 0; i < limit; i++)
    {
        int value;

        if(i == 0)  value = 0;
        if(i == 1)  value = 1;
        else        value = range[i - 2] + range[i - 1];

        range[i] = value;
    }

    *output = range;

    return 1;
}

Running it with limit 15 outputs

65, 1, 66, 67, 133, 200, 333, 533, 866, 1399, 2265, 3664, 5929, 9593, 15522

which is not right at all. I suspect it's because I'm writing stuff like range[i - 2] when that's not what I should be doing. I tried using the size of int as the hop between each value and got segmentation errors. Am I using [] correctly? Can anyone think of any other reason why my output is weird?

Here's all the code for the program

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range[i-2] is fine so long as i > 2. Have you tried stepping through your code in a debugger? –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 6 '11 at 0:37
4  
It's just a simple bug. Consider carefully what your code does for i == 0... (Hint: You wanted "else if" for the second arm) –  Nemo Sep 6 '11 at 0:38
    
Tangential note: The canonical idiom for malloc is int *range = malloc(sizeof(*range) * limit). Don't cast, and don't refer to hard-coded types in sizeof. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 6 '11 at 0:39
    
Don't cast? Whyever not? –  bmargulies Sep 6 '11 at 0:40
    
@bmargulies: See this: stackoverflow.com/questions/605845/…. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 6 '11 at 0:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change

if(i == 1)  value = 1;

to

else if(i == 1)  value = 1;

EDIT: Just realized this was already answered in the comments.

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Nemo never wrote this answer –  Hubro Sep 15 '11 at 6:38

The issue is with your ifs You have two if statements

if(i == 0)  value = 0;

and

if(i == 1)  value = 1;
  else        value = range[i - 2] + range[i - 1];

If i is 0 then the second if evaluates to range[-2] + range[-1] so undefined data from memory

You need to be using else so that it is just one if statement (also as a point of style always use {} to make things clearer)

if(i == 0) {  
   value = 0;
} else if(i == 1) {
   value = 1;
} else {
   value = range[i - 2] + range[i - 1];
}

In this example probably even better to set range[0] and [1] before the loop and start the loop at 2 so no need for the if.

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1  
+1 for the mention of starting the loop at 2, -1 for the style recommendation, whose clearness is clearly subjective. –  Christian Rau Sep 6 '11 at 0:49
    
I considered starting the loop at 2 before I even started writing, but how then would I be able to run the function with limit=1? –  Hubro Sep 6 '11 at 0:51

You're missing an else between the if (i==0) and if (i == 1), so the first time through both the 0 case and the 2+ case get run.

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