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If BaseFruit has a constructor that accepts an int weight, can I instantiate a piece of fruit in a generic method like this?

public void AddFruit<T>()where T: BaseFruit{
    BaseFruit fruit = new T(weight); /*new Apple(150);*/
    fruit.Enlist(fruitManager);
}

An example is added behind comments. It seems I can only do this if I give BaseFruit a parameterless constructor and then fill in everything through member variables. In my real code (not about fruit) this is rather impractical.

-Update-
So it seems it can't be solved by constraints in any way then. From the answers there are three candidate solutions:

  • Factory Pattern
  • Reflection
  • Activator

I tend to think reflection is the least clean one, but I can't decide between the other two.

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40  
I don't think you can expect people looking for a C# solution will check in the java tag – Boris Callens Jul 6 '10 at 16:02
up vote 156 down vote accepted

Additionally a simpler example:

return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new object[] { weight });

Note that using the new() constraint on T is only to make the compiler check for a public parameterless constructor at compile time, the actual code used to create the type is the Activator class.

You will need to ensure yourself regarding the specific constructor existing, and this kind of requirement may be a code smell (or rather something you should just try to avoid in the current version on c#).

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Since this constructor is on the baseclass (BaseFruit) I know it will have a constructor. But indeed, if one day I decide basefruit needs more parameters, I could be screwed. Will look into the ACtivator class though. Didn't hear of it before. – Boris Callens Apr 9 '09 at 11:29
3  
This one worked out fine. There's also a CreateInstance<T>() procedure, but that doesn't have an overload for parameters for some rason.. – Boris Callens Apr 12 '09 at 11:29
4  
There is no need to use new object[] { weight }. CreateInstance is declared with params, public static object CreateInstance(Type type, params object[] args), so you can just do return (T) Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), weight);. If there are multiple parameters, pass them in as separate arguments. Only if you already have a constructed enumerable of parameters should you bother to convert it to object[] and pass that to CreateInstance. – ErikE Aug 4 '15 at 16:36

You can't use any parameterised constructor. You can use a parameterless constructor if you have a "where T : new()" constraint.

It's a pain, but such is life :(

This is one of the things I'd like to address with "static interfaces". You'd then be able to constrain T to include static methods, operators and constructors, and then call them.

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1  
You're all fruity! :) – Patrick McDonald Apr 8 '09 at 19:36
7  
I really just wanted to say Skeeted. – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '09 at 19:44
    
At least you CAN do such constraints - Java always disappoints me. – Marcel Jackwerth Apr 9 '09 at 0:58
    
@JonSkeet: If I exposed the API with .NET generic to be called in VB6.0..Does it still workable? – Roylee Dec 13 '12 at 7:52
    
@Roylee: I've no idea, but I suspect not. – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '12 at 7:53

Yes; change your where to be:

where T:BaseFruit, new

However, this only works with parameterless constructors. You'll have to have some other means of setting your property (setting the property itself or something similar).

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30  
Darn, I got Robinsoned... – Jon Skeet Apr 8 '09 at 19:30
3  
@Jon Skeet: That came very close to making me laugh out loud (at work!). – Michael Myers Apr 8 '09 at 19:56
    
@MichaelMyers I wasn't that lucky – ppeterka Mar 14 '13 at 12:05

As Jon pointed out this is life for constraining a non-parameterless constructor. However a different solution is to use a factory pattern. This is easily constrainable

interface IFruitFactory<T> where T : BaseFruit {
  T Create(int weight);
}

public void AddFruit<T>( IFruitFactory<T> factory ) where T: BaseFruit {    
  BaseFruit fruit = factory.Create(weight); /*new Apple(150);*/    
  fruit.Enlist(fruitManager);
}

Yet another option is to use a functional approach. Pass in a factory method.

public void AddFruit<T>(Func<int,T> factoryDel) where T : BaseFruit { 
  BaseFruit fruit = factoryDel(weight); /* new Apple(150); */
  fruit.Enlist(fruitManager);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Good suggestion - although if you're not careful you can end up in the hell of the Java DOM API, with factories galore :( – Jon Skeet Apr 8 '09 at 19:35
    
@Jon, wouldn't want that :) – JaredPar Apr 8 '09 at 19:38
    
Yes, this is a solution I was concidering myself. But I was hoping for something in the line of constraints. Guess not then.. – Boris Callens Apr 9 '09 at 11:30
    
@boris, unfortunately the constraint language you are looking for does not exist at this point in time – JaredPar Apr 9 '09 at 13:18

You can do by using reflection:

public void AddFruit<T>()where T: BaseFruit
{
  ConstructorInfo constructor = typeof(T).GetConstructor(new Type[] { typeof(int) });
  if (constructor == null)
  {
    throw new InvalidOperationException("Type " + typeof(T).Name + " does not contain an appropriate constructor");
  }
  BaseFruit fruit = constructor.Invoke(new object[] { (int)150 }) as BaseFruit;
  fruit.Enlist(fruitManager);
}

EDIT: Added constructor == null check.

EDIT: A faster variant using a cache:

public void AddFruit<T>()where T: BaseFruit
{
  var constructor = FruitCompany<T>.constructor;
  if (constructor == null)
  {
    throw new InvalidOperationException("Type " + typeof(T).Name + " does not contain an appropriate constructor");
  }
  var fruit = constructor.Invoke(new object[] { (int)150 }) as BaseFruit;
  fruit.Enlist(fruitManager);
}
private static class FruitCompany<T>
{
  public static readonly ConstructorInfo constructor = typeof(T).GetConstructor(new Type[] { typeof(int) });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although I don't like the overhead of the reflection, as others have explained, this just is the way it is currently. Seeing how this constructor won't be called too much, I could go with this. Or the factory. Don't know yet. – Boris Callens Apr 9 '09 at 11:27

Most simple solution Activator.CreateInstance<T>()

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Recently I came across a very similar problem. Just wanted to share our solution with you all. I wanted to I created an instance of a Car<CarA> from a json object using which had an enum:

Dictionary<MyEnum, Type> mapper = new Dictionary<MyEnum, Type>();

mapper.Add(1, typeof(CarA));
mapper.Add(2, typeof(BarB)); 

public class Car<T> where T : class
{       
    public T Detail { get; set; }
    public Car(T data)
    {
       Detail = data;
    }
}
public class CarA
{  
    public int PropA { get; set; }
    public CarA(){}
}
public class CarB
{
    public int PropB { get; set; }
    public CarB(){}
}

var jsonObj = {"Type":"1","PropA":"10"}
MyEnum t = GetTypeOfCar(jsonObj);
Type objectT = mapper[t]
Type genericType = typeof(Car<>);
Type carTypeWithGenerics = genericType.MakeGenericType(objectT);
Activator.CreateInstance(carTypeWithGenerics , new Object[] { JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(jsonObj, objectT) });
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