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what is the difference between this two code snippets?

    always @(posedge clk) begin
            r3 <= @(posedge clk) 1;
            r2 <= @(posedge clk) 1;
            ready = 0;
            while (r2 <= n) begin
                r2 <= @(posedge clk) r2 + 1;     <--- never stops executing
            end
    end


    always @(posedge clk) begin
            r3 <= @(posedge clk) 1;
            r2 <= @(posedge clk) 1;
            ready = 0;
            while (r2 <= n) begin
                @(posedge clk) r2 <= r2 + 1;     <--- normally executes
            end
    end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When the simulator executes r2 <= @(posedge clk) r2 + 1, it performs the following steps:

  • evaluate r2 + 1
  • schedule a non-blocking assignment (NBA) update event to be executed at the next posedge clk

When the simulator executes @(posedge clk) r2 <= r2 + 1, it performs the following steps:

  • suspend the always process and schedule it to resume at the next posedge clk
  • when the process resumes, execute the r2 <= r2 + 1 NBA, by doing the following:
    • evaluate r2 + 1
    • schedule an NBA update event for the current time

The first form parses as a non-blocking assignment, and executes in zero time. The delay only applies to the update event generated when the NBA executes. The second form parses as a statement delay control followed by an NBA. It does not execute in zero time because the delay applies to the execution of the statement rather than just the update event.

The first form is an infinite loop because the body of the while loop executes in zero time and the events that will increment r2 are scheduled for a future time.

With the second form, you will still want to be careful about boundary conditions when the loop terminates. After scheduling an update that sets r2 to n + 1, the condition will evaluate as true one more time before that update is applied.

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1  
It should be noted that it's not usual to see @(posedge clk) statements sprinkled through code like that either. –  Marty Sep 6 '11 at 16:27
    
@Marty, is it a bad practice having @(posedge clk) statements scattered in my code? –  e19293001 Sep 7 '11 at 0:57
3  
@19293001: It is, especially for code that needs to be synthesised. In fact, I doubt if a synthesis tool will even look at it! –  Marty Sep 7 '11 at 11:49

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