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The question is about not=:

Clojure> (doc not=)
---------------------
Cloure.core/not=
    ([x] [x y] [x y & more])
    Same as (not (= obj1 obj2))

Clojure> (not= [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
false
Clojure> (not= '(1 2 3) '(1 2 3))
false
Clojure> (not= #(1 2 3) #(1 2 3))
true

Any suggestion is appreciated!

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Are you asking why the 3rd case is true? – Kevin Sep 6 '11 at 5:13
3  
Actually, #(1 2 3) is an anonymous function. Do you mean #{1 2 3}? – stand Sep 6 '11 at 5:14
1  
sorry for my foolish question :) – z_axis Sep 6 '11 at 5:28

Sets use braces

user=> (not= #(1 2 3) #(1 2 3))
true
user=> (not= #{1 2 3} #{1 2 3})    
false
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just for reference the # character is the "dispatch macro" in the clojure reader. it tells the reader to treat the expression folowing it specially. So far as I know it is the only reader macro defined in clojure.

  • #( ) define a function. short for (fn [< optional-args >] ...)
  • #" " define a regular expression
  • #' reference a var it's self instead of the value in a var.
  • #{ } define a set.
  • #_ don't read the next statement. this is like a super comment, it is more through than a comment but the distinction is not commonly used.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Always helpful to have this kind of elaboration. – Ray Toal Sep 7 '11 at 0:12
    
good info, had no idea that was called the dispatch macro – tjb Feb 4 '12 at 22:03

Others have commented that #(1 2 3) is not a set, but rather a function (that raises an error when invoked). The reason that #(1 2 3) is not equal to #(1 2 3) is that each invocation of #(...) creates a new anonymous function, and each new function belongs to a new Java class:

user=> (class #(1 2 3))
user$eval60$fn__61
user=> (class #(1 2 3))
user$eval64$fn__65

These classes have an equals method that doesn't consider objects of the other classes equal, even though they happen to have been defined in the same way. The method is in fact inherited from java.lang.Object:

user=> (for [m (.getMethods (class #(1 2 3)))
             :when (= (.getName m) "equals")]
         (.getDeclaringClass m))
(java.lang.Object)
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