Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Possible Duplicate:
What's the difference between encapsulating a private member as a property and defining a property without a private member?

I know the basic functionality of properties . But as i go through documentation in depth i see they are declared just with get set and without a variables .

what is the diffeence between these two

public int EmpCode
{
    get { return _strEmpCode; }
    set { _strEmpCode = value; }
}  

and

public int EmpCode
{
    get; 
    set; 
}  

Is it just a easier way of writing which got as .net frameworks got upgraded . Or is there any functional difference ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by CodeNaked, xanatos, Adam Sills, jgauffin, Benjol Sep 6 '11 at 6:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The later is called an Automatic Property and is the same.They were introduced in C#3, you can read more about them here: http://trashvin.blogspot.com/2008/05/automatic-properties-and-object.html

Simply put, Automatic Properties are syntactic sugar so the developer has to type less code and the compiler will generate the private field and the public setter and getter for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this shorthand for applicable all data types ? – Kuntady Nithesh Sep 6 '11 at 5:45
    
@Nithesh Hebri - Indeed it is. – Øyvind Bråthen Sep 6 '11 at 5:49
    
Its included in .net framework 3.5 ? – Kuntady Nithesh Sep 6 '11 at 5:58
1  
@Nithesh Hebri - Yes, .NET 3.5 is running c# 3.0 – Paul Sep 6 '11 at 20:39
    
@Paul thanx a lot – Kuntady Nithesh Sep 7 '11 at 1:52

This is called an automatic property. There is no functional difference. The latter syntax is just a shorthand of the former.

Section 10.7.3 of the C# specification gives more detail:

When a property is specified as an automatically implemented property, a hidden backing field is automatically available for the property, and the accessors are implemented to read from and write to that backing field.

The following example:

public class Point {
   public int X { get; set; } // automatically implemented
   public int Y { get; set; } // automatically implemented
}

is equivalent to the following declaration:

public class Point {
   private int x;
   private int y;
   public int X { get { return x; } set { x = value; } }
   public int Y { get { return y; } set { y = value; } }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
there is no functional difference, however if you are going to serialize auto props you will get confusing names for backing fields , which can be extremely annoying – vittore Sep 6 '11 at 5:35

It's called Auto-properties and is just a easier way of writing them if you don't need any logic inside the property. When compiled, the compiler will auto-generate a backing variable for the property so it's exactly the same.

It's easy to change the property into a property with a backing field and some logic later on, and that will not break any code dependant on this property, If you instead just used a public field first, and then changed it into a property you would break the code that relied on this field/property.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this shorthand for applicable all data types ? – Kuntady Nithesh Sep 6 '11 at 5:40
    
@Nithesh Hebri - Indeed it is. – Øyvind Bråthen Sep 6 '11 at 5:51

Second way is actually auto-property which implicitly implement backing field, which means that you cannot affect generated field name.

Most of the time you don't care, however in scenarios when you pass objects between layers using serializing / deserializing , you in some cases would have explicitly created backing field, in order to get rid of __propBackingField2735t34 like names on the client.

Also in explicitly coded properties some logic for validation can be included which is not the case for autoproperites

share|improve this answer

This is a enhancement from C# 3.0 which is termed as auto implemented properties, a private backing field is automatically created by the compiler in the background

share|improve this answer

there is no functional difference as such.. but if you want more functionality on your property setting/getting you may use the version with the private variables..

    public int EmpCode
    {
        get { return _strEmpCode > 0 ? 100 + _strEmpCode : 0; }
        set
        {
            if (value > 0)
                _strEmpCode = value;
        }
    }

Otherwise you can simply use the version without the private variables.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.