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I appear to be getting a segmentation fault somewhere with the strcmp function. I'm still very new to C and I can't see why it gives me the error.

int linear_probe(htable h, char *item, int k){
  int p;
  int step = 1;
  do {
    p = (k + step++) % h->capacity;
  }while(h->keys[p] != NULL && strcmp(h->keys[p], item) != 0);
  return p;
}

gdb:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000003a8e331856 in __strcmp_ssse3 () from /lib64/libc.so.6

(gdb) frame 1
#1  0x0000000000400ea6 in linear_probe (h=0x603010, item=0x7fffffffde00 "ksjojf", k=-1122175319) at htable.c:52

Edit: insertion code and htable struct

int htable_insert(htable h, char *item){
  unsigned int k = htable_word_to_int(item);
  int p = k % h->capacity;

  if(NULL == h->keys[p]){
    h->keys[p] = (char *)malloc(strlen(item)+1);
    strcpy(h->keys[p], item);
    h->freqs[p] = 1;
    h->num_keys++;
    return 1;
  }

  if(strcmp(h->keys[p], item) == 0){
    return ++h->freqs[p];
  }

  if(h->num_keys == h->capacity){
    return 0;
  }

  if(h->method == LINEAR_P) p = linear_probe(h, item, k);
  else p = double_hash(h, item, k);

  if(NULL == h->keys[p]){
    h->keys[p] = (char *)malloc(strlen(item)+1);
    strcpy(h->keys[p], item);
    h->freqs[p] = 1;
    h->num_keys++;
    return 1;
  }else if(strcmp(h->keys[p], item) == 0){
    return ++h->freqs[p]; 
  }
  return 0;
}

  struct htablerec{
      int num_keys;
      int capacity;
      int *stats;
      char **keys;
      int *freqs;
      hashing_t method;
    };

Thanks

Edit: valgrind - me entering random values to add to table

sdkgj
fgijdfh
dfkgjgg
jdf
kdjfg
==25643== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==25643==    at 0x40107E: htable_insert (htable.c:87)
==25643==    by 0x400AB7: main (main.c:75)
==25643== 
fdkjb
kjdfg
kdfg
nfdg
lkdfg
oijfd
kjsf
vmf
kjdf
kjsfg
fjgd
fgkjfg
==25643== Invalid read of size 8
==25643==    at 0x400E0E: linear_probe (htable.c:51)
==25643==    by 0x401095: htable_insert (htable.c:87)
==25643==    by 0x400AB7: main (main.c:75)
==25643==  Address 0x4c342a0 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==25643== 
==25643== Invalid read of size 8
==25643==    at 0x400E2B: linear_probe (htable.c:51)
==25643==    by 0x401095: htable_insert (htable.c:87)
==25643==    by 0x400AB7: main (main.c:75)
==25643==  Address 0x4c342a0 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==25643== 
==25643== Invalid read of size 1
==25643==    at 0x4A06C51: strcmp (mc_replace_strmem.c:426)
==25643==    by 0x400E3C: linear_probe (htable.c:51)
==25643==    by 0x401095: htable_insert (htable.c:87)
==25643==    by 0x400AB7: main (main.c:75)
==25643==  Address 0x210 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==25643== 
==25643== 
==25643== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV)
==25643==  Access not within mapped region at address 0x210
==25643==    at 0x4A06C51: strcmp (mc_replace_strmem.c:426)
==25643==    by 0x400E3C: linear_probe (htable.c:51)
==25643==    by 0x401095: htable_insert (htable.c:87)
==25643==    by 0x400AB7: main (main.c:75)
==25643==  If you believe this happened as a result of a stack
==25643==  overflow in your program's main thread (unlikely but
==25643==  possible), you can try to increase the size of the
==25643==  main thread stack using the --main-stacksize= flag.
==25643==  The main thread stack size used in this run was 8388608.
==25643== 
==25643== HEAP SUMMARY:
==25643==     in use at exit: 1,982 bytes in 28 blocks
==25643==   total heap usage: 28 allocs, 0 frees, 1,982 bytes allocated
==25643== 
==25643== LEAK SUMMARY:
==25643==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==25643==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==25643==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==25643==    still reachable: 1,982 bytes in 28 blocks
==25643==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==25643== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==25643== 
==25643== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==25643== Use --track-origins=yes to see where uninitialised values come from
==25643== ERROR SUMMARY: 7 errors from 4 contexts (suppressed: 6 from 6)
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

static unsigned int htable_word_to_int(char *word){
  unsigned int result = 0;
  while(*word != '\0'){
    result = (*word++ + 31 * result);
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is it successfully getting past the print statement? Are you sure your string is null terminated? –  Robert S. Barnes Sep 6 '11 at 7:25
2  
Either h->keys[p] or item is an invalid pointer. It will help to run this under a debugger, that way you can print the values of these at the point of failure. –  asveikau Sep 6 '11 at 7:25
    
You posted a GDB snippet, but this is not enough. One suggestion would be to go to the stack frame that has your code and start poking around. –  asveikau Sep 6 '11 at 7:36
    
@asveikau Sorry for being new to C, but how would I go about doing that? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:39
    
#asveikau: I think I got it. Check edit under gdb snippet. But even if my k is negative, doesn't p guarantee positive values because of the mod? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:44
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Apart from the possibility that the values in your htable may be invalid pointers (i.e., neither NULL nor a pointer to a decent C string), you have a serious problem of encountering an infinite loop if it contains neither a NULL nor the string you're looking for.

For the immediate problem, try changing the code to:

#define FLUSH fflush (stdout); fsync (fileno (stdout))

int linear_probe (htable h, char *item, int k) {
    int pos = k;
    do {
        pos = (pos + 1) % h->capacity;
        printf ("========\n");                    FLUSH;
        printf ("inpk: %d\n",   k);               FLUSH;
        printf ("posn: %d\n",   pos);             FLUSH;
        printf ("cpct: %d\n",   h->capacity);     FLUSH;
        printf ("keyp: %p\n",   h->keys[pos]);    FLUSH;
        printf ("keys: '%s'\n", h->keys[pos]);    FLUSH;
        printf ("item: '%s'\n", item);            FLUSH;
        printf ("========\n");                    FLUSH;
    } while ((pos != k)
          && (h->keys[pos] != NULL)
          && (strcmp (h->keys[pos], item) != 0));
    return pos;
}

Those debug statements should give you an indication as to what's going wrong.


Since you're getting:

inpk: -2055051140
posn: -30
cpct: 113
keyp: 0x100000001

right before the crash, it's evident that someone is passing in a bogus value for k. The modulo operation on negative numbers is implementation defined in the C standard so you're getting a negative value for pos as well. And since h->pos[-30] is going to be undefined behaviour, all bets are off.

Either find and fix the code that's passing in that bogus value (probably an uninitialised variable) or protect your function by changing:

int pos = k;

into:

int pos;
if ((k < 0) || (k >= h->capacity))
    k = 0;
pos = k;

at the start of your function. I'd actually do both but then I'm pretty paranoid :-)


And, based on yet another update (the hash key calculation, if you generate an unsigned int and then blindly use that as a signed int, you've got a good chance of getting negative values:

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {
    unsigned int x = 0xffff0000U;
    int y = x;
    printf ("%u %d\n", x, y);
    return(0);
}

This outputs:

4294901760 -65536

My suggestion is to use unsigned integers for values that are clearly meant to be unsigned.

share|improve this answer
    
I got these values: inpk: -2055051140 posn: -30 cpct: 113 keyp: 0x100000001 right before the segfault. What's wrong here? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:58
    
Your k is corrupt. See my update. –  paxdiablo Sep 6 '11 at 8:05
    
Hey I'm the paranoid one here. :P But anyway, I'm getting the k from a function that changes a string to an index. Bottom of post edit, could you take a look please? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 8:14
    
First function call at the top of the htable_insert function, takes the k value and passes it to linear_probe unaltered. –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 8:16
    
@paranoid, you may want to think about using unsigned ints everywhere. The act of calculating an unsigned int then assigning that to an int can be problematic. See my further update. –  paxdiablo Sep 6 '11 at 8:21
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Is h->keys completely initialized with NULLs? Else you have random pointers inside.

BTW,

h->keys[p] = (char *)malloc(strlen(item)+1);
strcpy(h->keys[p], item);

Always check the return of a function for validity if it signals an error, no matter how unlikely the error case may be. malloc() returns NULL on failure.

share|improve this answer
    
Check the edit if you like. :) –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:48
add comment

If you are on linux, try valgrind. It can tell you about invalid accesses, memory leaks, uninitialized variables, etc. The output may seem messy and hard to read, but if you keep trying, it will reward you. What is going on:

  1. build you program with -g switch to include debugging information
  2. run the program using valgrind: valgrind ./myprogram
  3. profit by reading output

As I said, the output may seem very messy, so maybe first try some simple program (plain empty main) to see how it looks like when everything is ok, then try to deliberately crash your program, like:

int *bullet = 0;
*bullet = 123;

and see the output.


A nice basic introduction with examples can be found here.


As you provided valgrind output, I would start to fix problems listed there. First the Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) error. You can rerun valgrind with --track-origins=yes as valgrind suggests to see more details, then fix it (you don't have line numbers in the code snippets, I cannot help you more).

./valgrind --track-origins=yes ./myprogram      #don't switch parameters!

Then the Invalid read of size 1 error means you are already accessing memory which is not yours, but reading it only, so it "doesn't mind". But it is still an error which should not happen, so fix it (if not fixed by the first error fix).

And finally, the Access not within mapped region is a write to memory which is not allocated.

Now try fixing the errors (in order valgrind lists them) following valgrind suggestions (like reruning it with switches).

share|improve this answer
add comment

well you did not include the code around htable around filling this hash table etc. strcmp probably segfaulted because you either gave it a NULL string or an array of chars not properly ending with a 0....

share|improve this answer
    
Should I dump the code where I'm filling the htable then? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:29
add comment

At first glance, my guess is that your segfault comes from p - you're never initializing that variable, so it is not guaranteed to start out at zero; it could start out at -123456 for all you know, and then you'd be accessing an invalid memory address. EDIT: Misread the do-while loop. Ignore this paragraph.

At second glance, I would check if h->keys[p] is a null-terminated string - strcmp goes on reading values until it hits a zero byte; if there's no such byte, it can keep on going until it hits an invalid memory address.

share|improve this answer
    
It's initialised before use inside the do loop. –  paxdiablo Sep 6 '11 at 7:29
    
Does that matter if it's immediately overwritten anyway? –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:29
    
arzenik: he doesn't initialize it, but assign a value (in the loop) before the variable is used (in the terminating loop) –  Dadam Sep 6 '11 at 7:31
    
@paxdiablo Ah, my bad. My second concern still holds; what does h->keys[p] look like? –  azernik Sep 6 '11 at 7:31
    
@paxdiablo Check the edit if you like. :) –  paranoid-android Sep 6 '11 at 7:39
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