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I have a function that takes another function as a parameter. Something like this :

public function onHits(target : Shape, callback : Function) : void

I use it by passing a member function as a parameter that should be called whenever the passed target hits something. The function is called many times a frame. So it is used by doing :

//code...
CollisionManager.onHits(myShape, onHitCB);
//code...

The on hit function :

public function onHitCB(hitObject : *) : void 
{
    //removed all code to test this problem
}

When I do this, I have a memory leak. I've isolated the problem to that onHits method and have commented out everything else. onHits is an empty method with no code inside it, onHitCB is also empty. If I comment out the call to onHits, there is no memory leak and if I pass null instead of onHitCB there is no memory leak.

So it's clearly when I pass onHitCB as a parameter that's the problem. So I thought it might be because Flash allocates some memory to create the Function pointer and doesn't release it but I call System.gc() every frame in debug mode and the leak is still there. Which would mean that this is either a bug in the SDK or I'm not doing something right.

I have found a weird workaround by keeping a variable that points to the function which I assign in the constructor of my object :

private var func : Function;

public function MyObject() 
{
    func = onHitCB;
}

and this will clear the memory leak even if I still pass onHitCB as the parameter. So that would mean that it's not the "getter" function to obtain the onHitCB but something else causing the memory leak?

I'm very confused. How can this cause a memory leak :

public function MyObject() 
{
}

public function update() : void
{
    CollisionManager.onHits(myShape, onHitCB);//empty function
}

public function onHitCB(hitObject : *) : void 
{
    //removed all code to test this problem
}

but not this? :

private var func : Function;
public function MyObject() 
{
    func = onHitCB;
}

public function update() : void
{
    CollisionManager.onHits(myShape, onHitCB);//empty function
}

public function onHitCB(hitObject : *) : void 
{
    //removed all code to test this problem
}

and is there a way to not have to do this workaround?

share|improve this question
    
Why not make onHitCB a class member to CollisionManager? Sounds like your function is loosing scope. On the last line of onHits try callback=null; –  The_asMan Sep 6 '11 at 21:59
    
Tried setting the callback to null at the end of onHits but the leak is still present. So far, keeping a local reference to the Function is the only workaround I was able to find. –  Godfather Sep 8 '11 at 0:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

[...] bound methods are automatically created when you pass a method as a parameter. Bound methods ensure that the this keyword always references the object or class in which a method is defined. Source

That sounds like creating a reference to a method isn't using a simple getter. A new method closure object is generated. So your assumption is right.

I wonder why the references aren't cached for each instance and why they aren't garbage collected though. Better avoid creating multiple references. Referencing a method only once is exactly what I would do when I would have to use that method in multiple places, so most of the time I wouldn't call it a workaround but a good DRY practice. In your example it makes sense of course, assuming a method reference would be using a simple getter.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, this confirms my suspicions about an object being created every time the function is passed. However I still don't understand why keeping a local reference while still passing the function (and not the local reference) would no longer create a memory leak. –  Godfather Sep 6 '11 at 10:16
    
I think it is only generated when the method name is used directly (on assignment or when used as a parameter). So func = onHitCB; will generate the method closure only once, using func as parameter won't cause it to be generated again. –  kapep Sep 6 '11 at 10:22
    
yes but I am not using func as a parameter, I am still using onHitCB (if you look carefully at the 2 exemples above, they both call onHits using onHitCB) that's the biggest mystory to me. My best explination right now would be that the method closure is cached as a weak reference which would normally get cleaned by the garbage collector but doesn't for an unknown reason. Since it's a weak reference, it would need to be regenerated at every call but since I keep a reference locally, it stays alive long enough to be reused at later calls. –  Godfather Sep 6 '11 at 10:52

For more information on exactly what does and does not cause memory leaks when you use functional techniques, check out http://www.developria.com/2010/12/functional-actionscript-part-1.html . Also, be aware that using static methods like this is really bad practice (http://misko.hevery.com/code-reviewers-guide/flaw-brittle-global-state-singletons/), and you're just beginning to encounter the many problems that are caused by using this technique. It sounds like you're early enough in your project that you're not completely committed to this path, so you might want to look at other ways to program this.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure what your code is about in the onHits function, but if it not requiring additional time to finish in another cycle. then i recomend you to do like this:

static public function onHits(target : Shape) : *
{
    // do what you need

    // return the hitObject;
    return hitObject;
}

and

public function update() : void
{
    // parse the object direc to to the function.
    onHitCB ( CollisionManager.onHits(myShape) );
}

public function onHitCB(hitObject : *) : void 
{
    if ( hitObject == null )
        return;

    // if it not null then do all your calculations.
    //removed all code to test this problem
}
share|improve this answer
    
At the moment, the onHits function does nothing. I have removed all code from it yet simply calling it by passing a Function pointer will create a memory leak. I can avoid the problem by changing the design of my code but simply passing a Function pointer shouldn't cause this problem (>.<) –  Godfather Sep 6 '11 at 10:06

And this is why we don't do this kind of thing in OOP style programing.
Your best bet is to do it properly and add the callback to the CollisionManager class.
The reason it can be GCed when you keep a local reference is because the function never loses scope because that var is there holding the reference.
Once something looses scope it becomes nearly impossible to GC it.

Try this and watch how you lose scope.

private var somevar:String = 'somevar with a string';
public function MyObject() 
{
}

public function update() : void
{
    CollisionManager.onHits(myShape, onHitCB);//empty function
}

public function onHitCB(hitObject : *) : void 
{
    trace(this.somevar) // scope should be lost at this point and somevar should be null or toss an error.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is this not supposed to work? I'm not sure what you mean by losing scope (Function pointers keep a reference to the instance they are a member of so they can be called with the right this argument). Passing a Function by parameter works fine and traces "somevar with a string" like it should (I think?). I don't see why passing a callback Function that must be called when a collision is detected can be "bad design", each object can and probably should handle collisions differently. This is used in multiple cases (box2D does this for it's collision engine I believe) since it's more flexible. –  Godfather Sep 8 '11 at 6:21
    
Ok bad example. If I get time I will post an edit for you better explaining what I was talking about. –  The_asMan Sep 8 '11 at 15:55

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